New Footwear for 2010, Part 2: Trail and Multi-Sport Shoes, Miscellaneous Footwear

Top shoe companies are throwing ever more technology into their soles, lacing systems, and overall construction. Part 2 of our series on 2010 footwear looks at trail shoes (essentially below-the-heel hiking boots); multi-sport shoes, which combine features of multiple sports categories; and miscellaneous outdoor footwear like the Vibram FiveFingers line that didn't fit in other categories. 

Previously: Boots and Climbing Shoes. Coming up in Part 3: Trail Runners and Outdoor Socks.

Trail Shoes

Ahnu Sequioa Ahnu Sequoia

Women’s-specific design using Ahnu’s NPS (neutral positioning system) technology to promotes balance and performance.

Materials: Mesh and leather
Sizes: Women's 6-11 (half sizes)
Weight: 11.4 ounces per shoe
MSRP: $99.95
Available: January 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Ahnu MoragaAhnu Moraga

Ahnu NPS design with oiled Nubuck suede and moisture-wicking mesh lining to keep feet cool and comfortable.

Materials: Nubuck suede and mesh
Sizes
: Men's 7-12 (half sizes), 13, 14
Weight: 15.1 ounces per shoe
MSRP: $109.95
Available: January 2010

More in the Gear Guide

ECCO Fast TrailECCO Fast Trail

Fast Trail features ultra-sticky rubber bottom and a dual-density EVA midsole for traction and cushion. ECCO’s Receptor technology is designed to mimic natural foot motions.

Materials: Mesh upper
Sizes
: Euro men's 40-46
MSRP: $125
Available: Spring 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Ecco Alaska IIECCO Alaska II

Waterproof light hiker using Ecco's Receptor system. Quick-pull laces won't come untied.

Materials: Mesh and Gore-Tex
Sizes
: Euro Men's 40-46
Weight: 13 ounces per shoe
MSRP: $130
Available: Now

More in the Gear Guide

Garmont AdventureGarmont Adventure

Light hiker built on a running-shoe last with a grippy Vibram outsole.

Materials: Mesh and leather
Sizes: Men's 8-13 (half sizes), 14; Women's 5-11 (half sizes)
Weight: 13.2 ounces per shoe
MSRP: $94.95
Available: Spring 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Garmont MomentumGarmont
Momentum

Hiker vented for breathability in warm weather. Gore-Tex version will be available for those who hike in wet climes.

Materials: Mesh and leather
Sizes
: Men's 8-13 (half sizes), 14; Women's 5-11 (half sizes)
Weight: 14.1 ounces per shoe
MSRP: $99.95
Available: Spring 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Kayland CrestKayland Crest

Low-rise hiker optimized for tough terrain and backpacking. Features Kayland's Contact asymmetrical lacing system.

Materials: Water-repellent suede upper
Sizes
: Men's 8-13 (half sizes), 14; Women's 6-10 (half sizes)
Weight: 1.1 pounds per shoe
MSRP: $129.95
Available: March 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Kayland Legend RevKayland Legend Rev

Waterproof low-cut hiker with outer soles designed for a high level of comfort and traction.

Materials: eVent Cocona membrane
Sizes
: Men's 8-13 (half sizes), 14; Women's 6-10 (half sizes)
Weight: 1.1 pounds per shoe
MSRP: $129.95
Available: March 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Merrell ColMerrell Col

Low-cut selection from new Col collection, which  weds classic hiking performance with the latest technologies. Versions of the Col include Gore-Tex or proprietary waterproof liners and Ventilator uppers for high breathability. 

Materials: Full-grain leather
Sizes
: Men's 7-12 (half sizes), 13, 14, 15
Weight
: 1.2 pounds per shoe
MSRP
: $115
Available: Spring 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Montrail AT PlusMontrail AT Plus

Low-rise hiker built for fast-packers, thru-hikers and other demanding trail users. Gore-Tex version also available.

Materials: Nylon mesh upper with thermoplastic weld support bands
Sizes
: Men's 7-12 (half sizes), 13, 14,15; Women's 5-11 (half sizes)
Weight: 14 ounces per shoe (women's); 14.4 ounces per shoe (men's)
MSRP: $115
Available: Spring 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Scarpa EpicScarpa Epic

Light hiker/approach shoe  incorporates trail-running technology to reduce weight, sustain comfort. Gore-Tex version also available.

Materials: Suede and synthetic upper
Sizes
: Euro men's 39-47, 48 (half sizes);Euro women's 36-43 (half sizes)
Weight
: 13.6 ounces per shoe (men's size 42); 's 11.4 ounces per shoe (women's  38)
MSRP: $95
Available: Early 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Scarpa MoraineScarpa Moraine

Suede ribcage snugs the midfoot to support hikers and adventure travelers in a lightweight package. Gore-Tex version also available.

Materials: Suede
Sizes: Euro men's 39-47, 48 (half sizes);
Euro women's 36-43 (half sizes)
Weight
: 15.8 ounces per shoe (men's size 42); 14 ounces per shoe (women's 38)
MSRP
: $95
Available: Early 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Scarpa MoraineScarpa Mystic GTX

Waterproof, all-suede design combines comfort of trail shoes with traction of approach shoes.   

Materials: Suede with Gore-Tex
Sizes: Euro men's 39-47, 48 (half sizes); Euro women's 36-43 (half sizes)
Weight: 1 pound per shoe  (men's size 42);  13.6 ounces per shoe (women's 38)
MSRP: $139
Available: Early 2010

More in the Gear Guide

 

 

Multi-Sport Shoes

GoLite Lime Lite GoLite Lime Lite

Flexible lacing design for trail or town travels. GoLite says its "Soft Against the Ground" technology supports like a clog and rides like a sneaker. 

Materials: Synthetic upper
Sizes: Men's 7-13 (half sizes), 14; Women's 5.5-11 (half sizes)
Weight: 14.5 ounces per shoe (men's size 9)
MSRP: $110
Available: February 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Oboz HardscrabbleOboz Hardscrabble

Ventilated hiker with sole support and deep lugs for trail running and peak bagging.  

Materials: Double layer abrasion resistant mesh
Sizes: Men's 8-12 (half sizes), 13, 14; Women's 6-11 (half sizes)
Weight: 16.1 ounces per shoe (men's size 9); 12.9 ounces per shoe (women's 7).
MSRP: $110
Available: Spring 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Oboz CountourOboz Contour

Oboz brings the "bootie" design  of its trail runners to a versatile trail-and-travel shoe. The slip-on bootie construction has no tongue and is built to snug firm against the foot.

Materials: Synthetic leather
Sizes: Men's 8-12 (half sizes), 13, 14; Women's 6-11 (half sizes)
MSRP: $110
Available: Spring 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Vasque JuxtVasque Juxt

Designed as an everyday comfy shoe, the Juxt is trail-ready with a firm midsole and  Vasque's sticky OTG (Off the Grid) outsole for footing on slippery surfaces. 

Materials: Synthetic mesh
Sizing: Men's 7-12 (half sizes), 13, 14, 15; Women's 5-11 (half sizes)
Weight: Men's (size 9) 14.4 ounces per shoe
MSRP: $90
Available: February 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Vasque OpportunistVasque Opportunist

Mesh uppers build breathability into a hiker designed for shifting into adventure mode at a moment's notice. Opportunist line also includes a waterproof low-rise shoe and mid-ankle boot.

Materials: mesh upper
Sizing: Men's 7-12 (half sizes), 13, 14, 15; Women's 5-11 (half sizes)
Weight: Men's (size 9) 13.6 ounces per shoe; Women's (size 7) 12 ounces per shoe
MSRP: $80
Available: February 2010

More in the Gear Guide

 

 

 

 

Miscellaneous Footwear

GoLite Cloud LiteGoLite Cloud Lite

The Cloud Lite  clog matches PawPad hiking soles for traction and Soft Against the Ground technology for comfort. Women's version is the Moon Lite.  

Materials: Synthetic leather
Sizes: Men’s 7-13 (half sizes), 14
Weight: 13 ounces per shoe (men's size 9)
MSRP: $85
Available: February 2010

More in the Gear Guide

GoLite Arhat LiteGoLite Arhat Lite

Airy, protective sandal employing GoLite's Soft Against the Ground technology and PawPad II hiking sole. This is a men's only sandal.  

Materials: Leather
Sizes: Men’s 7-13 (half sizes), 14
Weight: 14.5 ounces per sandal (men's size 9)
MSRP: $90
Available: February 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Inov-8 Recolite Inov-8 Recolite 190

This "recovery shoe" is a shoe/sandal hybrid to wear before and after races, traveling, and everyday recreational outings.

Materials: Synthetic fibers
Sizes: Men’s 5-13 US; Women’s 7-11 US (whole sizes only)
Weight: 6.7 ounces per shoe (men’s size 9)
MSRP: $85
Available: February 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Inov-8 Oroc 340Inov-8 OROC 340

Orienteering  shoe with tread spikes for winter outings. Metal dobs meet terrain only when absolutely necessary, ensuring traction on slick surfaces.

Materials: Synthetic fibers
Sizes: Men’s 5-13 (half sizes), 14; Women’s 6.5-11 (half sizes)
Weight: 11.9 ounces per shoe (men’s size 9)
MSRP: $180
Available: April 2010

More in the Gear Guide

Kamik Sophia Boots Kamik Sophia

Shearling lined for cold and rainy conditions. Lightweight, warm and waterproof; Wintergarden outsole for maximum traction. 

Materials: Shearling lined
Sizes: Women’s 6-11 (whole sizes)
Weight: 1.75 pounds per boot
MSRP: $149.99
Available: Now

More in the Gear Guide

 

Vibram Five Fingers PerformaVibram FiveFingers Performa

Fitness-training version of Vibram's barefoot-travel shoes. Outsole not designed for extended outdoor use. Men's version is the Moc.

Materials: Perforated leather
Sizes
: Women's 5-11.5
Weight
2 ounces per shoe (Women’s size 38)
MSRP: $110
Available: Now

More in the Gear Guide

 

Vibram Five Fingers KSO TrekVibram FiveFingers KSO Trek

The Trek is a beefier upgrade of Vibram's KSO barefoot-style trail walkers.  New outsole and tread design increase  protection and traction on rugged terrain.   

Materials: Kangaroo suede leather
Sizes: Men's 7.5-14
Weight: 6.7 ounces per shoe (men’s size 9)
MSRP: $125
Available: Now

More in the Gear Guide

 

 

 

 

Previously: New Boots and Climbing Shoes for 2010.

Next week in Part 3: Trail Runners and Outdoor Socks

Filed under: Gear News

Related Content

Ahnu  |  Ecco  |  Garmont  |  GoLite  |  Inov-8  |  Kamik  |  Kayland  |  Merrell  |  Montrail  |  Oboz  |  Scarpa  |  Vasque  |  Vibram  |  Winter Boots  |  Sport Sandals  |  Trail Shoes  |  Footwear

Comments

Performance
0 reviewer rep
78 forum posts
January 12, 2010 at 1:26 p.m. (EST)

To merely list a bunch of hiking shoes and alternative type shoes in my opinion misses the point and value in presenting them. We need to know how they perform in relative comfort, motion efficiency and durability. Relative in the sense that one reviewer will subjectively judge it differently then another. We should hope to see some judgment coincidence.

Here unfortunately we have a list presented without judgment by jury of hikers skilled and experienced in the subject. Runners World and Trailrunner magazines do just that. That's what we need at Trailspace, analysis of products to effectively guide the multitude in making wise purchase decisions/experiments. I'm also disappointed in the weights of the submitted list. As many of us know, each pound of shoe weight worn is equivalent to roughly 6.4 lbs. carried on your back. Shoe construction/weight is related to pack weight in that the load should not be uncomfortable per on-your- feet time. You can carry roughly a 20 lb. fully loaded pack with an 11 to 12 ounce shoe in relative comfort. I would have hoped to see a list more in line with lower weights as most hiking is weekend applicable and therefore more in keeping with the majority need for a hiking shoe and curiosity as to what's new.

Alicia
TRAILSPACE STAFF
685 reviewer rep
3,103 forum posts
January 12, 2010 at 3:09 p.m. (EST)

Performance, yes, this is a preview of new footwear (much of which is not out yet, or is only just about to be released), not a review or judgment of each shoe's performance. I hope that is evident to readers from the article's presentation.

Readers often want to know what is new in a certain gear area. So, we occasionally highlight new offerings, like this. It would be impossible for any publication to adequately review every single new gear offering.

That said, I completely agree that gear reviews are essential information, and we'd prefer to publish more useful information versus less. On top of publishing thousands of individual user reviews of outdoor gear, including footwear, Trailspace publishes many of its own gear reviews and is working hard to expand its gear reviews and content. When Trailspace chooses to review a particular piece of gear and then publish that information, we expect the information to meet a high standard to do it justice.

I'll note that each of these shoes has its own dedicated page in the Gear Guide, where users can find them and add reviews over time, which I hope they will do.

Thanks for your comments.

Performance
0 reviewer rep
78 forum posts
January 17, 2010 at 12:15 a.m. (EST)

Alicia, Why not determine what the community thinks about their trail shoes, our most important hiking tool? Let's say that about five to ten trail shoes turn out to be the most popular and preferred amongst the myriad of shoes out there via response to a survey. This is what's missing in every publication. No one knows what shoe to buy. Marketing hype, salespersons lies. Trust the community that buys and in fact ends up with a yea or nay. This goes way beyond the few trail testers approach used by the magazines. The results would be posted and the community will then know which shoes are favored and are presumably better. What about it? Spreadsheet the results. Let the community respond to criteria such as: Manufacturer, model, comfort, performance and durability. The rating system could be a simple one to 5. However, you decide on the criteria and rating system. Although each of us have different arch types, pronation, supination, adduction and abduction issues, a simple survey will clarify which trail shoes rise to the top.

Alicia
TRAILSPACE STAFF
685 reviewer rep
3,103 forum posts
January 17, 2010 at 5:58 p.m. (EST)

Alicia, Why not determine what the community thinks about their trail shoes, our most important hiking tool?

Hi, Performance. Thanks for the comments. I'd say that what you're asking for is exactly the point of the Gear Guide and all of the user reviews there.

For example, if you go to a specific product category (like trail shoes) you'll get a list of all the available trail shoes sorted by review (with ones no longer available sorted farther down the list). The better the user review ratings, and the more ratings there are, the higher the product gets rated/sorted on the list.

However, as you point out, there is a great deal more info that can be relevant and useful, and we currently are working on greatly expanding the scope of that information in the Gear Guide, as well as how users will be able to access, sort, and compare that info. We're also expanding how we get gear into the hands of the right testers, to share their experiences. So, if you stay tuned with Trailspace, you'll see some major changes down the road.

You raise some interesting points to consider though, as we revamp things, and it's always interesting to hear from members and readers about how they use gear info or how they'd like to access that info.

In the meantime, if someone has an opinion on a trail shoe or any other gear, they should go ahead and write a review for the benefit of all Trailspace readers and members.

Thanks!

trouthunter
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
998 reviewer rep
3,495 forum posts
January 17, 2010 at 7:07 p.m. (EST)

If I may....

I think one of the positive aspects of individual gear reviews vs. compiled data is that you can get a good idea of the validity of the rating given by the reviewer based on the comments they make.

Example:

John - "I bought these shoes today and I must say they are the greatest pair of trail shoes I have ever had, great fit, nice lacing system, excellent soles (they are Vibram!) great ventilation, and waterproof thanks to the Gore-tex liners." "I give these boots 5 stars!"

Mary - "I bought these trail runners two years ago and have been pleased with them. After adding custom footbeds I got a good fit but they are a bit narrow. I had blisters on one occasion but contribute that to them being new, no problems since. The soles have worn a bit quicker than I had hoped but traction is good. These shoes have kept my feet dry for the most part, but lately have started to get a little damp with the occasional stream crossing. The toe rand on the left shoe came loose, but that was due to abuse and some shoe goo fixed it right away. Overall a good shoe for the money, but I'm disappointed in the life of the sole." "I give these shoes 3 1/2 stars"

I think this is a fair example of the types of review one reads, while John is well meaning and excited about his purchase, I would question the rating he gives because he has not used the product and his opinion seems to be based on initial quality only.

Mary has used the shoes for two years and gives a more balanced assessment of the performance a buyer may expect from this product. In fact I would say that I would be more inclined to buy the shoe after reading Mary's review than John's. After two years of use Mary only seems to be disappointed in the life of the sole. From my own experience I don't think two years is bad for a soft soled trail runner.

Just my thoughts...

Alicia
TRAILSPACE STAFF
685 reviewer rep
3,103 forum posts
January 17, 2010 at 7:29 p.m. (EST)

Those are great points to raise, trouthunter. The reliability and experience of different users/reviewers is something we're giving great consideration.

trouthunter
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
998 reviewer rep
3,495 forum posts
January 17, 2010 at 7:58 p.m. (EST)

Alicia, I think these variables are a given, regardless of listing individual reviews or just giving compiled data such as spreadsheets.

I guess there are ways to sort the reviews used to compile data, but I like to read the individual reviews myself, I think Trailspace is on the right track.

Reading individual reviews also gives insight to the thought process of people who may be new to backpacking, and I think this could be useful when trying to give advise about technique or other aspects of hiking & backpacking.

Performance
0 reviewer rep
78 forum posts
January 17, 2010 at 11:18 p.m. (EST)

Alicia and trouthunter, One first needs the generality before the details.

When I read Trailrunner or Runner's World magazines, I see a limited list of shoes reviewed by a few testers - a simple run of shoes with details. I'm frustrated to realize that the list doesn't include shoes that I know have been tested and proven worthy. I'm seeing a list of "What's new on the block." Big deal! I also know that only a hand-full of testers have reviewed them and that in most instances it's one set of shoes per tester. What have I learned? Very little. Polling the Trailspace community provides a plethora of response capability based on a myriad of user experiences. Spread-sheeting based on a simple set of criteria using the data sort and filter functions would show the quantity of users that had bought the same shoe and liked it. Assuming that five to ten shoes show-up on top, we have our simple list of shoes, the generality. Why they've arrived at that conclusion can be a running list of details per respondent with a limitation on quantity of respondents listed and the amount and type of info requested.

Why first the generality and then the details? Because I first need to know which berries are edible and preferred. Then I'll want to know about their nutritional value, taste, habitat, relative sweetness, etc.

Alicia
TRAILSPACE STAFF
685 reviewer rep
3,103 forum posts
January 18, 2010 at 6:12 a.m. (EST)

That Trailspace community poll already exists: it's writing a gear review.

The Trailspace Gear Guide has ALL shoes (and other gear) listed, not just brand new ones. When you go to a gear category you get a list of gear sorted by Trailspace user ratings (general info) and can then read the individual reviews (for specifics). You can even see ratings for discontinued models. It's all in there. We don't weight products simply for being brand new, but based on the ratings of users. We don't remove product info once a piece of gear is discontinued. You can even keep rating old gear forever.

Yes, we can add and will add more info, details, and features, which (as I said before) we are working on, but the shoes are already listed in the Gear Guide and ready to be reviewed. Individuals in the Trailspace community simply need to go and write a review to add their info and opinion about a shoe (or other gear) to the general and specific ratings. And if we miss a shoe, then users can simply add their own review and we'll put it on the site.

We're already polling the Trailspace community every day. Anyone who wants to voice an opinion on a piece of outdoor gear for the benefit of others should write a review.

Hope that helps.

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