Stop Reading this Blog: National Day of Unplugging starts at sundown Friday


Avoid technology (1). Nurture your health (3). Get outside (4). Find silence (9). 

Turn off this computer. Hide the smartphone and iPad. Back away from Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, email, the TV, and even (gasp) your favorite outdoor website.

Instead, from sundown on Friday evening, March 4, through sundown on Saturday, March 5, celebrate the National Day of Unplugging.

The National Day of Unplugging is part of the Sabbath Manifesto project, "a creative project designed to slow down lives in an increasingly hectic world." You needn't be Jewish or even religious to participate. The project encourages the frantic and hyper-connected of all backgrounds to embrace a weekly day of rest. (Did you know that “Sabbath” comes from the Hebrew shabbat, meaning to cease?)

The National Day of Unplugging focuses on the first principle of the Sabbath Manifesto: Avoid Technology.

The ten principles (below) are open to interpretation, but it's worth noting how easily most mesh with a hike, backpack, snowshoe, or other outdoor sojourn.

10 Principles of the Sabbath Manifesto:

  1. Avoid technology.
  2. Connect with loved ones.
  3. Nurture your health.
  4. Get outside.
  5. Avoid commerce.
  6. Light candles.
  7. Drink wine.
  8. Eat bread.
  9. Find silence.
  10. Give back.

It's up to you how far you take the National Day of Unplugging's avoid-technology principle at home or outdoors. Please don't turn off your avy beacon or anything else essential. But, are you able to turn off your GPSR for a day in favor of a map and compass? What about the altimeter that records all those ascents and descents? Can you skip the heart rate monitor?

Still reading? Get ready to turn off this computer by Friday sundown. Reclaim your time. Slow down. Reconnect with friends, family, your community, nature, and yourself. Make unplugging a family activity. Introduce a friend to the outdoors. See how many of the 10 principles above you already follow during your favorite outdoor activities (be careful with the candles and wine though).

Then let us know how your day of unplugging goes. Just do so sometime after sundown on the 5th.

 

National Day of Unplugging

Sundown on Friday, March 4, through sundown on Saturday, March 5

www.sabbathmanifesto.org/unplug


Filed under: Events

Comments

BigSmoke
33 reviewer rep
201 forum posts
March 4, 2011 at 12:10 p.m. (EST)

This might have been a good idea on a Saturday. Lets be realistic, we all have jobs and if we want to keep them, 99% of us will not be "unplugging" on a workday.

Alicia
TRAILSPACE STAFF
588 reviewer rep
3,079 forum posts
March 4, 2011 at 12:29 p.m. (EST)

This might have been a good idea on a Saturday. Lets be realistic, we all have jobs and if we want to keep them, 99% of us will not be "unplugging" on a workday.

BigSmoke, the sabbath day starts at sundown (evening sunset) today, Friday, and goes though sundown (evening sunset) on Saturday. So most of it is on Saturday.

However, if that doesn't work, you're encouraged to apply the principles however they fit into your life. You can also have a weekly unplugged day of your own choosing. I'm considering this for myself.

BigSmoke
33 reviewer rep
201 forum posts
March 4, 2011 at 1:50 p.m. (EST)

Ok! unplugging tonight. Maybe I should make it easy, grab the wife and head to Shenandoah!

Alicia
TRAILSPACE STAFF
588 reviewer rep
3,079 forum posts
March 4, 2011 at 1:57 p.m. (EST)

Ok! unplugging tonight. Maybe I should make it easy, grab the wife and head to Shenandoah!

Excellent idea! Please report back if you do it. I'm on board (or rather, off-keyboard?) too.

Seth Levy (Seth)
TRAILSPACE STAFF
410 reviewer rep
1,062 forum posts
March 4, 2011 at 5:33 p.m. (EST)

This is a great idea.  I'm a semi-practicing Jew, and do Shabbat every week.  Why?  Well, religious reasons aside, the practice of inviting friends, the disadvantaged, and family into your home, celebrating with good wine, and good food, and taking 24 hours to take stock of the blessing of being alive - it's a great process.

 

The nice thing about this particular tradition, is that it has a value that is entirely separate from the Judeo-Christian history.

 

 

Ben Cerise
57 reviewer rep
59 forum posts
March 4, 2011 at 8:58 p.m. (EST)

Nice!

JimDoss
REVIEW CORPS
563 reviewer rep
286 forum posts
March 4, 2011 at 11:47 p.m. (EST)

I turn off the computer every night before I go to bed.  :-)

Pathloser
52 reviewer rep
312 forum posts
March 5, 2011 at 5:00 a.m. (EST)

Unplugging now.

 

Edit: I couldn't do it.

OK, just kidding. I will try this. Thanks for bringing it up.

DrReaper
14 reviewer rep
318 forum posts
March 6, 2011 at 2:50 p.m. (EST)

Isn't there something in the bible or even torah about carrying a load on the sabbath? I am pretty sure it says your not supposed to carry a load on the sabbath. 

 

denis daly
87 reviewer rep
1,065 forum posts
March 6, 2011 at 3:53 p.m. (EST)

Sabbath refers to Holy holiday. It also states to refrain from work in both the Bible and the Torah.. Now the carry a load you refer to is in the Bible, Torah and Quran. That pertains to owners or boss's giving heavy loads to employee's or individuals and not themselve's..IMO..

Seth Levy (Seth)
TRAILSPACE STAFF
410 reviewer rep
1,062 forum posts
March 7, 2011 at 8:29 a.m. (EST)

What constitutes "work" on the sabbath is a subject of continuous religious debate.  Sweating, carrying heavy loads, etc..are pretty widely regarded as being "work."  For myself, I think of work as more of a state of mind than a particular level of exertion.  For instance, carrying a heavy load through the mountains isn't always work for me!

 

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