Gaiters

9:33 p.m. on October 9, 2011 (EDT)
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From my blog, thanks for taking a look !

http://dwayne-oakes.artistwebsites.com/blogs/the-mighty-gaiters.html

Take care,

Dwayne Oakes

9:00 a.m. on October 10, 2011 (EDT)
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Yep!  I keep a set of gaiters in my pack for the same reasons.  Don't always use them, but they don't keep the same dust on em either.

10:07 a.m. on October 10, 2011 (EDT)
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I have my gaiters custom made; nothing fancy, it is just that most gaiters are too small to fit my telemark double boots, that and I prefer something with more breatheability than goretex and coated nylon.

Ed

10:31 a.m. on October 10, 2011 (EDT)
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Ahhh gaiters. I use OR Salamanders in the wet/rainy seasons. I have actually used these with shorts as well when travelling through high(damp) vegetation.


SL-w-Gaiters-003.jpg
DSCI1273.jpg

With the Keen Oregon
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I use the OR Crocs for the white stuff... Getting close to the time that I need to dig them out of storage. 

10:36 a.m. on October 10, 2011 (EDT)
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I only own one set of gaiters and they are the OR crocs. I typically only use them in the winter or when it's been really wet and the trail is going to be a muddy slushy mess.

10:43 a.m. on October 10, 2011 (EDT)
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TheRambler said:

I only own one set of gaiters and they are the OR crocs. I typically only use them in the winter or when it's been really wet and the trail is going to be a muddy slushy mess.

 The reason I ended up going with the Salamanders is I noticed as I traveled in the mornings(dew) through damp vegetation or in the rain the tops of my socks would wet out and the moisture would wick down into my boot. This eliminates that problem.

At the same time they also keep out the pebbles and trail debris. Sure beats ripping the boots off on trail to dump out the crud repetitively. 

Not quite sure if I am sold on the rigid forefoot covering on the gaiter yet though. Oh well I suppose it serves a purpose.

I probably could've utilized the Crocs for this purpose as well but I just don't want to hammer on the Crocs year round. I would rather keep them specific to winter use only. Cuts down on wear and tear.

11:13 a.m. on October 10, 2011 (EDT)
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Agree.  Just got a pair of OR Verglas gaiters.  The extra protection is nice.

11:42 a.m. on October 10, 2011 (EDT)
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I will say with the Salamanders I see a potential problem. If you look at the 3rd photo I posted with the Keens one could have a problem with the forefoot(rigid) covering catching on the toe cap of the boot when pushing off.

This could cause the toe cap to delaminate from the boot over time. 

Just an observation from use...

I see a gear review coming up shortly. ;)

2:10 p.m. on October 10, 2011 (EDT)
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i have low gaiters that i use when i expect a lot of mud.  the bottom part is coated nylon, the top uncoated.  the strap under my feet is rubber, and they pull tight on top with a thin elastic cord & lock.  they open from the front, thick piece of velcro hook/loop.  looks like REI doesn't make them any more, but not surprising - these have to be close to ten years old.  the coated nylon part keeps water out, keeps a good bit of moisture in.  very durable, though. 

for x/country skiing and snow w/normal boots, i have a pair of mountain hardwear nutshell gaiters, the high ones.  pretty old.  they used to be coated nylon; now they are just...nylon, a fair bit of the inner coating has worn off.  string strap under the arch, replaced a number of times, same front hook/loop closure.  a little hot for warm weather hiking.  good at keeping stuff out.  these have also got to be several years old. 

i have a pair of OR expedition crocs that i use with plastic mountaineering boots; they would also be fine with a pair of sorels, but they are too wide at the bottom to wear with regular boots.  i think they are gore tex, and the bottom part is heavily reinforced because they are prone to getting tagged by crampons.  these are in pretty good shape, but they replaced an older pair that were pretty torn up  and patched with duct tape. 

i tend to not wear gaiters unless there is snow on the ground, or if it's raining hard, or really, really muddy because they make my feet & legs feel too warm.  as a result, i tend to get debris and little stones working their way into my boots.  so, i stop, cuss, remove the shoes and dump the debris, then continue, wondering why i didn't wear the gaiters - then i remember, i don't like that hot feeling. 

writing this response made me wonder why i don't ditch those old REI gaiters for eVent, i figured someone has to make them.  a quick search revealed, yes, integral designs makes a short eVent gaiter.  doesn't have any hook/loop or zipper opening, it's a tube with a shock cord underfoot and at the top, with a small toggle.  so, you have to remove your shoes to remove the gaiter.  no matter, for 25 bucks, i just ordered a pair, and i'm going to give them a try. 

2:58 p.m. on October 11, 2011 (EDT)
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I've about 4-pairs ... various.

Among them, I like the lower cut OR "Bugout Gaiters" ( for trail, it says ) with 'insect*shield'.   Supposedly with "breathable packcloth".   Hmmmm ....   Not so breathable, in my not-so-humble opinion.

A pair of OR "Crocs".   Hate 'em.   You don't want me to go into my "Gore-Tex Manifesto", so I'll spare Y'all.

Let's just say, I DO NOT agree with the OP, here.

Two pairs of generic packcloth gaiters.   They're OK.   Just OK.

I am ready to pop for a pair of VENTILE gaiters, made in the UK.    I'm choking on the $55 (USD) price, WITHOUT shipping, which is about $30.

I am pretty fond of VENTILE as a fabric / material.   So this is pretty much a "no-brainer" for me.  " No perspiration build-up"  is the name of that tune.   Not to mention comfort and durability.

I just checked-out some VENTILE clothing.   A (longish) jacket is $1900 (incl shipping to USA).   THAT oughtta  choke a horse.

~ r2 ~

BTW -- Shouldn't this post-topic be in "GEAR SELECTION" ??

I know, I know -- This can legitimately be a "BACKCOUNTRY"  topic.  


11:48 p.m. on October 13, 2011 (EDT)
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gaiters are great

2:03 a.m. on October 14, 2011 (EDT)
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I have a pair that I got with my snow shoes, don't remember the name or brand, they were fairly cheep.  The go from the boots to just below my knees, they seemed to work OK in the snow, keep most of it off my blue jeans.  Yes I know what the hell was I doing out snow shoeing in blue jeans!  :) 

I have been thinking about getting something for spring / fall, more for rain and wet trails then for rocks and stuff, I don't have much of a problem with that.  Is it better to get something short like the ones in Ricks post or something taller?  I hike in shorts a lot, so if it was really wet or raining I could put on rain paints or chaps, and that would keep my legs dry. 

Any suggestions or ideas would be great.

Wolfman

6:23 p.m. on October 15, 2011 (EDT)
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Snake proof gaiters

http://tinyurl.com/43h7lr8

3:04 a.m. on October 19, 2011 (EDT)
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 bought some new leather Gaiters last week, and I really want to break them in before Sunday as I have a show and would love to wear them, I’ve ridden in them once, but they haven't dropped enough to jump in without digging right into the back of my knee, any tips?
Thanks 

3:44 a.m. on October 19, 2011 (EDT)
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Mart145 said:

 bought some new leather Gaiters last week, and I really want to break them in before Sunday as I have a show and would love to wear them, I’ve ridden in them once, but they haven't dropped enough to jump in without digging right into the back of my knee, any tips?
Thanks 

Hi  Mart145 and welcome to  Trailspace,

I have lots of leather and the only way to break it in is too break it in.  Leathers that are finished differntly need different products to take care of them.  But there is a product for every leather, for every situation.  I would find out what leather conditioner/softener the gaiter maker recomends and wear them all day every day until the great ride(?, bikes, horses, ?,).  If you can't wear them thru out the week during the day then I would go get some action with them after work, hiking, riding, etc.  If your too tired because of work then use your conditioner/softener and work them by hand.  Kinda like what we would do when I was a kid with a new baseball glove.  Glycerin is a great leather softener that seems to work on all the leather products I've tried it on as a softener, but again consult the warranty dept. of the manufacture and find out what they recommend.

9:21 p.m. on October 19, 2011 (EDT)
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My favorite gaiters are a pair of Millet canvas gaiters from the late '70s. Although I also have a pair of Chouinard gaiters in goretex. I've also got a bunch of others. The Millets are nice because they stay up without a lot of tension, but are still flexible. They are, however, very patched and worn by now.

9:23 a.m. on October 27, 2011 (EDT)
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Bought 2 years ago OR gaiters and have been a gaiter fan ever since, they cut down on cuts, sorry no help with bruising. The heat issue well wear zip off convertible pants and even with mid calf gaiters enough cooling goes on. They help with keeping water out boots, mud and as mentioned other unwanted objects. They help with warmth in winter although a lighter is a good thing to have handy to de ice the buckle after a long snow shoe breaking trail.

The weak point of any gaiter seems to be the strap under the boot, this is where they seem to skimp, but easily fixed or repaired even on the trail with the help of duck tape

2:30 p.m. on October 27, 2011 (EDT)
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Mart145 said:

 bought some new leather Gaiters last week, and I really want to break them in before Sunday as I have a show and would love to wear them, I’ve ridden in them once, but they haven't dropped enough to jump in without digging right into the back of my knee, any tips?
Thanks 

 Mink oil

9:17 a.m. on October 29, 2011 (EDT)
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I love gaiters. I have an old pair that I picked up somewhere back in 1974. The lable on them says "Chuck Roast Conway N.H." Probably my oldest piece of gear. For Summer and Fall I use OR "Rocky Mountain Low Gaiters". They keep pebbles and water out (clumsey stream crossings) and keep me from spending time picking hitchhikers out of my socks.

11:25 a.m. on October 29, 2011 (EDT)
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The list of gear for my trek suggests gaiters. I got some low ones, but since I have never used them, wonder if I should get something more substantial for Nepal in March/April.

2:16 p.m. on October 29, 2011 (EDT)
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giftogab said:

The list of gear for my trek suggests gaiters. I got some low ones, but since I have never used them, wonder if I should get something more substantial for Nepal in March/April.

 If it were me I would. Then again, I'm a gearhead.

6:35 p.m. on October 29, 2011 (EDT)
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I am too, Rick....found out we had a Columbia Outlet here and ran down there like a heroin addict and parted with 100 bux before I could get outta there! Gonna start my own gaiter research now!

6:55 p.m. on October 29, 2011 (EDT)
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I just bought another Osprey Stratos 26 daypack. I am going to hook my buddy up with one. He likes mine alot and he doesn't have one so I figured I would get him an early xmas present.

I'm always buying something lol. Alot of it has to do with what sales are going on.

7:14 p.m. on October 29, 2011 (EDT)
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Today was REI garage sale but the crowds were prohibitive so I found the Columbia......ARRRGGHH! But got another softshell pants, rain hat and fleece vest....no gaiters there...AND they had Mountain Hardwear!

7:18 p.m. on October 29, 2011 (EDT)
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MH and Columbia are affiliated with each other.

9:57 p.m. on October 30, 2011 (EDT)
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Gifttogab, the knee high gaiters are light weight and compact easily no matter which brand. Make sure you get the correct size. Cordura or other heavy material for the bottoms(ankle and below) are useful. The top should have a closure that is comfortable. Millet use a wide elastic band, which I like.

10:09 p.m. on October 30, 2011 (EDT)
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Thanks, Erich....I am rather thick in the legs, so am trying to be sure to figure that part out!

4:27 p.m. on October 31, 2011 (EDT)
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i have been using a pair of low Integral Designs eVent gaiters recently, very happy with them.  they are only ankle-high, intended for 3 season use or very light snowfall; i'm considering using them for x-country skiing if it's tracked.  love the way these breathe, avoiding moisture accumulation around the ankles and lower leg.  they don't have any hook/loop opening, it's basically a short tube that fits over the top of your boots.

i would consider higher gaiters for Nepal.  if you want to go inexpensive and convenient, mountain hardwear's nut shell gaiter is simple and pretty easy to use.  extremely durable, mine are years old.  if you plan to wear crampons at all, bring a little extra utility cord - the cord that runs under your arch tends to be vulnerable to abrasion anyway, and crampons can cut them up pretty quickly if you misstep.  i'm sure outdoor research makes a similar gaiter in the 30-40 dollar range, and their gaiters are generally very well made.  at the low price point, gaiters are going to be made of coated nylon - waterproof, but they won't let any moisture escape, either.  spending more money can get you gaiters where the upper, the part around your calf and lower leg, is gore tex and breathes a little better. 

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