Single Use Antibiotic Packs

1:41 a.m. on January 23, 2012 (EST)
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I found this idea, along with some other good ones, on another website, "GASP!".  It addresses making your own single use anti-B packs using plain old drinking straws.  Here is the website if you want to look at it.  I am in no way promoting the website, just thought it was a neat idea because I carry Neosporin but I hate having to carry the entire tube.  I made a few up and put some in my wife's 1st aid kit and in my own.  Works great.

http://www.briangreen.net/2011/07/diy-single-use-antibiotic-packs.html

6:51 a.m. on January 23, 2012 (EST)
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I make lots of things into containers with drinking straws, though i would be hesitant about an ointment such as neosporin etc. It can spoil, i would do it for a trip perhaps, but not leave it that way stored in the straw indefinitely. By spoiling i mean that it just get much less effective, especially after it is exposed to air(squeezing it into the straw).

I would only do this on a short term basis, maybe a month or two at a time? I however routinely pack spices, honey, sun screen, olive oil, and have also tried putting vaseline coated cotton balls in the straws which seems to work well.

7:39 a.m. on January 23, 2012 (EST)
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Great find Rob!  Recently one of the moms in my sons cub scout den was putting together some film canister first aid kits and couldn't find the single use packs even at doctors offices.  Had to use alcohol wipes. I hate carrying the entire tube and I would rather not pay the price for the individual packs.

9:18 a.m. on January 23, 2012 (EST)
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TheRambler said:

I would only do this on a short term basis...

 Agreed

3:37 p.m. on January 23, 2012 (EST)
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Great idea!  Sayyyyy, this would work great for hot sauce, or lotsa other stuff.  You got my brain to thinkin there Rambler.

5:36 p.m. on January 23, 2012 (EST)
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Yessir Guyz, i make up packets specific to each trip. Between regular packets you can pick up at some places and the straws i come with a broad range of spices and what not.

7:40 p.m. on January 23, 2012 (EST)
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That's a cool trick.

I have been using a new contact lens case to store Neosporin & Hydrocortisone.

I used the single use packs of first aid supplies for a while but I just use small containers for most of it now. I use a small tube with screw on cap for tablets, no label though I just have to remember what they are.

Great idea for spices.

9:19 p.m. on January 23, 2012 (EST)
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Nice little trick!

Just found my way for carrying my hot sauce thats just to thick for use in a dropper bottle.

Maybe toothpaste also, I like the options with this.

Cool find! Thanx for posting

9:22 p.m. on January 23, 2012 (EST)
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Knew and have used it with spices, thought about useing this for my oils but I use a 2oz dropper bottle. But makes me think about my first aid and survival items like Rambler useing it for cotton balls.

5:05 p.m. on January 24, 2012 (EST)
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I know many people who carry squeeze tubes of honey to suck on while hiking and as a sugar substitute in their tea or cooking.

Honey also serves as an excellent treatment for wounds, both to promote healing and as an antibiotic. Therefore, if you are already packing honey, you don't need to carry Neosporin as well. Of course, if you like Neosporin, fine, but multi-use would favor honey.

This is not just some "crunchy granola" idea; check the medical literature itself. Google - honey medicinal properties - in Scholar. You will find 24,700 peer-reviewed articles on the use of honey in countering infection, reducing inflammation, etc. Some start skeptical such as http://www.jacksscale.com/Honey%20in%20the%20Management%20of%20Infections.pdf

which felt that most studies were too small; however, in conclusion noted:

In conclusion, honey has been shown to be
clinically useful in various settings involving
soft tissue infections and non-healing wounds,
and there appear to be some properties of
honey that are controlling infection other than
via the strictly osmotic effect. The caveat is that
all of the data are generated from small studies,
generally without rigorous statistical analysis.
It is unlikely that the large studies with
elaborate monitoring of protocol and professional
statistical analysis will ever be done, as
the expense of such studies is unlikely to ever
be rewarded with the proceeds of honey sales
to make such research financially feasible.

IOW, drug companies can't make money selling honey :)

So, if you take your honey hiking, and either of you need a topical skin treatment, honey is a ready answer.

7:04 p.m. on January 24, 2012 (EST)
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If you want the best tasting honey make sure you buy Warren County Honey from the ace hardware store in Vicksburg MS! Sorry shameless plug lol, but it really is delicious. Whenever i go home to visit Mom i always bring back 50 or so liters of honey. Love me some honey.

8:32 a.m. on January 25, 2012 (EST)
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Overmywaders said:

Honey also serves as an excellent treatment for wounds, both to promote healing and as an antibiotic. Therefore, if you are already packing honey, you don't need to carry Neosporin as well. Of course, if you like Neosporin, fine, but multi-use would favor honey.

I did not know that.  I usually bring honey on the trail anyway for my tea and as a sweetner.  My minimalist mindset will probably drop the neosporin.

2:23 p.m. on January 28, 2012 (EST)
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good idea, I like it.

1:18 p.m. on February 5, 2012 (EST)
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Great info on the straws and the honey!! 

Question on the honey, how do you keep it from going solid?  It seems like every time we get a jug of honey (Quart) it will firm up before it gets used.  Reheating it makes it liquid again, but then it just hardens back up.

Also on the straw packs, how hard is it to open one of these after it's sealed up?  It looks really small and with my big mitts, well not sure if I would have to take some scissors along just to open them?

Wolfman

12:52 a.m. on February 6, 2012 (EST)
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I too have used the straw method to hold small amounts of things.  I hadn't considered the antibiotics because my best friend is a nurse, and can get the small one time packs.  But the are really kind of fun to play with. I LOVE the do it yourself stuff :)

I use a candle with needle nose pliers to get the heat and crimp down. Anybody else have other ideas?

3:53 p.m. on February 6, 2012 (EST)
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Wolfman said:

Also on the straw packs, how hard is it to open one of these after it's sealed up?  It looks really small and with my big mitts, well not sure if I would have to take some scissors along just to open them?

The article said you could open it by pressing the other end between the finger & thumb, however, I couldn,t do it.  You probably will have to cut it with a knife like I did.  I carry a small razor knife for opening & cutting.  It's only .6 ozs.

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