Crampons

3:43 p.m. on July 13, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

I'm a long dayhiker/summit scrambler type. Occasionally I cross snowfields and perhaps a bit of ice to get to my destination. I hike alone by the way. I always carry an ice axe, but am contemplating a set of crampons. For my limited use, with a pair of Scarpa SL3 off-trail boots, would you suggest aluminum light weight crampons or the standard steel heavies? Prices seem about the same, but the alum. ones save around 10 ozs. Does alum. hold up well enough, and should one take them off on a short rock stretch between snowfields? Can anyone help this poor old undecided hiker? Thanks in advance!

4:41 p.m. on July 13, 2001 (EDT)
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408 forum posts
Camp LC 480's

Quote:

I'm a long dayhiker/summit scrambler type. Occasionally I cross snowfields and perhaps a bit of ice to get to my destination. I hike alone by the way. I always carry an ice axe, but am contemplating a set of crampons. For my limited use, with a pair of Scarpa SL3 off-trail boots, would you suggest aluminum light weight crampons or the standard steel heavies? Prices seem about the same, but the alum. ones save around 10 ozs. Does alum. hold up well enough, and should one take them off on a short rock stretch between snowfields? Can anyone help this poor old undecided hiker? Thanks in advance!

I have the aluminum Camps. Cheap. Reasonable durable. I'd take them off for the rock...but...short stretches, if you tip toe, shouldn't hurt them too bad.

Brian in SLC

September 2, 2014
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