For those of you who like to stay in trailside shelters

10:06 a.m. on August 23, 2012 (EDT)
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http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2012/08/yosemite-rare-rodent-borne-disease.html

A man died from hantavirus he caught while he stayed in a trailside shelter. 

Evidently this is only an issue at high altitude so maybe its not much of a risk to those of you who routinely use trail shelters in the Eastern US. Its probably a very isolated incident and unlikely bother most hikers. 

Since shelters are so uncommon out here though they still seem a little odd to me; people going to the wilderness for solitude then sleeping with a bunch of snoring strangers.  Its one reason people dislike Camp Muir.  There though you aren't required to use the bunkhouse. 

 

 

Jeff

1:19 p.m. on August 23, 2012 (EDT)
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This has been an issue for years up here in N CA where I live.  Plumas Eureka St Park by Johnsville.  The campground was closed last year for repairs and since the virus broke out again, it killed two birds with one stone.  Just Yosemite gets more attn.

Duane

1:42 p.m. on August 23, 2012 (EDT)
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Jeff,

Even before published reports of virus I've never liked (nor have I met anyone who really "likes" it) staying in those shelters.

I've been accused of being elitist or snobby but it's the same reason I don't like staying in cheap hotels: lots of people stay there but few people clean them.

Here is article from Whiteblaze about Norovirus from AT shleters in TN and NC (where I go alot). Specifically about AT thru-hikers contracting a Norovirus.

I hope to not have to use any more shelters on my trips.

1:59 p.m. on August 23, 2012 (EDT)
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Correction: The two victims were in the tent-cabins in Curry Village, not in trailside shelters. The two incidents (the woman survived) were unrelated, though both were in Camp Curry. The rodents involved are deer mice. Extensive cleaning and disinfecting operations are continuing there and in the so-called housekeeping cabins (which are not cabins at all, but more like tarp tents).

However, as noted above, trail shelters and abandoned buildings throughout the US (especially the Southwest) and elsewhere are often the homes of infected rodents carrying the virus. It is not a problem confined to high altitude - it is very common in desert areas and has been found in old abandoned mining shacks in Death Valley, as well as the deserts of New Mexico and Arizona.

Camp Curry has long been an inexpensive (relatively) alternative in Yosemite Valley to camping or the much more expensive Yosemite Lodge (basically a motel) or the ultrafancy Ahwahnee Hotel). I have stayed there many times with my family, though more usually I am with the rest of the dirtbag climbers in Camp 4. Camp Curry has also been the scene several times in the past few years of rockfall from Glacier Point Apron, with the result that it is currently much reduced in size from what it was even 10 years ago.

5:51 p.m. on September 1, 2012 (EDT)
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Update:    Yosemite virus warning to 10,000 US campers

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-19447160

3:56 p.m. on September 2, 2012 (EDT)
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Now need mice proof food containers

5:30 p.m. on September 2, 2012 (EDT)
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instead of the bearikade what would it be? the mouseikade? I wonder what these mice do in winter, do they hibernate?

5:45 p.m. on September 2, 2012 (EDT)
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I actually hang my bear bags on trail because I am more worried about raccoons and mice than I am bears.

image.jpg

7:40 p.m. on September 3, 2012 (EDT)
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Callahan said:

Now need mice proof food containers

 Another good reason to use a bear canister even when bears aren't a threat!

7:44 p.m. on September 3, 2012 (EDT)
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Trailjester said:

instead of the bearikade what would it be? the mouseikade? I wonder what these mice do in winter, do they hibernate?

Don't they live under the snow in little burrows where they've cached food during the summer months?  (I guess they don't know about the rules against caching food in national parks) :-D

11:27 a.m. on September 4, 2012 (EDT)
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I guess thats what they do. you never seem to see them in winter. they must be down in thier little hidey hole munching away...guess I'm keeping my bearikade, was thinking of selling it, but I guess I'll keep it now.

11:32 a.m. on September 4, 2012 (EDT)
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I used to hike with a guy that used to use paint cans for critter proofing. he said it worked real good. I dont know what a bear would do to it, but if your in a bear free zone, a paint can might be worth looking into.

7:26 p.m. on September 4, 2012 (EDT)
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I had squirrels and mice ram sack a camp once. I had hung all my food but forgot to hang the dog food I had in my backpack for my dogs. I had to to cut the trip short cause there wasn't enough left to feed the dogs for the remainder of the trip.

8:24 p.m. on September 4, 2012 (EDT)
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Well, there is always the 5000 volt every 1.5 second "electric bear canister."

http://www.modernhiker.com/2008/07/14/electric-bear-canisters/ 

Zzzzzzzzzzzzaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaappppppppppp !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Should make grabbing breakfast in the morning kinda fun if ya don't pay attention. 

Especially if the weather is a bit wet and you just so happen to be standing in a puddle. 

5:31 p.m. on September 5, 2012 (EDT)
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Trailjester said:

I guess thats what they do. you never seem to see them in winter. they must be down in thier little hidey hole munching away..

Watch a coyote or wolf in winter. When they jump straight up and come down with all four feet digging into the snow (closely followed by their muzzle) you'll know they're hunting for the mice they've detected under the snow.

It's actually quite funny to watch (unless you're a mouse of course).

5:52 p.m. on September 5, 2012 (EDT)
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peter1955 said:

Watch a coyote or wolf in winter. When they jump straight up and come down with all four feet digging into the snow (closely followed by their muzzle) you'll know they're hunting for the mice they've detected under the snow.

Fox are pretty interesting as well:

 

6:40 p.m. on September 5, 2012 (EDT)
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God I miss winter. It has been a way too hot and humid summer. Bring on that white stuff!

3:59 p.m. on September 7, 2012 (EDT)
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No, mice do not hibernate.  I've been out snowshoeing and seen all kinds of footprints and scat, including mouse.

I have had them rattle in my stuff in shelters in the winter.  That was my bad for not putting my stuff away better, and caused me more than a little time to wash out my cups and cook gear because of the company it kept over night.

I bought my bearcan with little critters in mind much more so than for bear protection.  (and I always have a place to sit!)

As for the hantavirus, it seems to be one of those deals that cycles around. I remember a few years ago of a bad outbreak.  How unbelievable that unsuspecting victims get nailed with such a strange virus.  How many of us have at least rested at a shelter when out and about. Wow.

7:49 p.m. on September 7, 2012 (EDT)
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there's been another death from the yosemite hantavirus outbreak. that makes three so far. they say about 10,000 people were exposed to it. eek! 

11:24 a.m. on September 14, 2012 (EDT)
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i actually enjoy staying in the shelters.. This incident is the first i've heard about hantavirus

7:28 p.m. on September 14, 2012 (EDT)
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it has been a recurring problem in norcal and in at shelters for sometime. something to be aware of.

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