Backcountry mischief....

12:42 p.m. on December 30, 2012 (EST)
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So I was looking at my sleep pad and got to thinking. It could make for an interesting sled ride on the right hill if placed on top of some heavy grade plastic or other protective low friction material(free of debris/fresh powder.)

Exped-DM-7-009.jpg

Yes, I am a gearhead but at the same time I am a curious gearhead who sometimes thinks outside of the box. This doesn't necessarily mean I will act on my curiousity though. :p

4:57 p.m. on December 30, 2012 (EST)
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sounds like a good way to put a hole in your mattress! we always used to use garbage bags when out snowcamping. a little cold and rough on the butt, but fun.

4:58 p.m. on December 30, 2012 (EST)
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Well, I have to test the patch kit somehow. ;)

5:01 p.m. on December 30, 2012 (EST)
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go for it!

5:05 p.m. on December 30, 2012 (EST)
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Lol...

7:34 p.m. on December 30, 2012 (EST)
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Wrap that expensive pad in a thick blanket, watch out for rocks and go for it! Or got to wally world and buy a sled for 20 bucks, it would prob work better but with your curiosity being satisfied. Last year at one of hammockforums winter hangs the were sleddin in a rockin chair and one guy hurt his ass so he used his pad in the chair for the rest of the night.

8:01 p.m. on December 30, 2012 (EST)
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I thought about the blanket but I thought it would generate too much friction against the snow's surface.

I really don't wanna tote a sled into the bc but then again it could serve double duty as a pulk(we now have enough snow.)

Hey wait a minute. This might give me the ability to haul a spit on my trip.

A backcountry hog roast might be interesting...

11:25 p.m. on December 30, 2012 (EST)
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DJLHAYDEN,

I like turtles!

Thank you for the brilliant non sequitur.

2:00 a.m. on December 31, 2012 (EST)
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If your looking something to carry, they make sheet plastic sleds that will roll up. You could put one in you bag, let it unroll and pack your gear inside it.

6:19 a.m. on December 31, 2012 (EST)
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If you have enough snow to really use a sled etc then bring a lightweight pulk made out of a cheap kids sled from a hardware store. Perfect for hauling gear over snow and makes for some fun on the downhills! I just strap the sled to the back of my backpack, so that the shoulder straps face up towards the sky.. And either carry the pack as a pack still or put it down and pull it. You dont have to have the fancy harnesses and poles, a simple rope works fine in a pinch.

12:28 p.m. on December 31, 2012 (EST)
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hotdogman said:

If your looking something to carry, they make sheet plastic sleds that will roll up. You could put one in you bag, let it unroll and pack your gear inside it.

 Those would work great! Just a semi-rigid plastic sheet with a hand-hold cut into one end so you have something to hang onto. Weighs almost nothing, and way faster than just sliding down the hill on your butt. 

1:33 p.m. on December 31, 2012 (EST)
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The Discovery Channel aired a series, "Everest: Beyond the Limit," about a summit bid that included double amputee Mark Inglis.  Inglis suffered frostbite on the ends of his amputated legs and had to do the descent by sliding down, rigged with ropes, on a closed-cell foam pad.  might make a better sled than an inflated pad. 

5:16 p.m. on December 31, 2012 (EST)
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I did it with my ridgerest pad. worked good, you just can't steer!

5:28 p.m. on December 31, 2012 (EST)
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Who needs to steer? The trees will help with that. Maybe I could create a new sport... ... pinballing. :)

6:13 p.m. on December 31, 2012 (EST)
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peter1955 said:

hotdogman said:

If your looking something to carry, they make sheet plastic sleds that will roll up. You could put one in you bag, let it unroll and pack your gear inside it.

 Those would work great! Just a semi-rigid plastic sheet with a hand-hold cut into one end so you have something to hang onto. Weighs almost nothing, and way faster than just sliding down the hill on your butt. 

We called those crazy carpets. They go fast. Steering (and I think this would work on a CCF pad too) was done by digging your heels in on one side or the other. I suppose you could also brake with your heels, but we never tried it.

Got any well-frozen ponds and a brisk wind? If you put your skates on, you can hold up your crazy carpet and use it as a sail. ZOOM.

Happy New Year, everybody. Play safe!

8:41 p.m. on January 1, 2013 (EST)
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Went toboganning the other day. What can I say I'm a giant kid! Used a couple crazy carpets too Islandess. Yeah steering is a big issue. Get a couple grown men together, have a couple drinks and you think you can get a couple people on them. Thats when you end up hitting your shin off a metal lamp post at the bottom of the hill and have a big cut/bruise on your leg. I speak from, errrr, experience.

3:41 a.m. on January 2, 2013 (EST)
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Darwin Awards spring to mind...

10:29 p.m. on January 2, 2013 (EST)
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I've used my gaiters for short, but steep runs.  One trip, a guy packed in a handled sled, just big enough to plant your butt on.  After a run or two, the trail was packed, you could really go for it.

Duane

7:34 a.m. on January 3, 2013 (EST)
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I have a swedish something sled. Its exactly butt sized with a handle on each side. If im goin somewhere I know has an open slope I take it and a crazy carpet. The crazy carpet goes with me a lot during the winter, it makes a good dry seat around the fire. Plus it really hauls a$$ on a hill.

7:37 a.m. on January 3, 2013 (EST)
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I dont know why I keep forgetting to mention my shovel. You can sit on it and lean back holding the handle or if your brave tie some cord to the t at the top of the handle and stand up like it was a snowboard, but feet together dacing forward like skis. Try a little hill first with this one.

11:11 a.m. on January 3, 2013 (EST)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Who needs to steer? The trees will help with that. Maybe I could create a new sport... ... pinballing. :)

Nothing new at all about doing this, it is old as snow travel itself.  Been there and done that.  Not much fun, though, the hip and elbow bruises took over a month to dissipate.

Ed

4:06 p.m. on January 5, 2013 (EST)
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bouncing off trees just doesn't seem like fun to me...never have. we always used to look for a clear area to slide down. I guess I'm just a wimp. 

10:16 p.m. on January 9, 2013 (EST)
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We used to use full length rain parkas and spray with Pam and slide down head first. It worked really well the next day after the snow melted a bit then refroze!

6:18 a.m. on January 10, 2013 (EST)
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greenninja5150 said:

We used to use full length rain parkas and spray with Pam and slide down head first. 

 

10:13 p.m. on January 10, 2013 (EST)
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We tried a toboggan but found they eat huge depressions where the snow is soft and jumps where the snow is hard.

The "last run" with that toboggan finished off with us taking the obvious jump that was getting larger with each run we took. We knew this one needed to be the last or we would have to fill the depression in some with snow to level it off.

We came off that jump expecting to land on some relatively soft snow and then coast out onto the lake. Funny thing was... We penetrated that soft snow which made a HUGE new jump. We landed hard on the solid ice, four gown men a bit surprised and a bit traumatized.

The roll up plastic sheets have two handhold slots and are a blast. We stayed up late many nights at the old snowcave. We went down through some trees to the lake and had to build a run. It ended up being pretty much like a bobsled run but required maintenance after each run as we steered with our toes and elbows.

We never hit any trees but did wear out a lot of gear with it rubbing the snow/ice. I'd go through a pair of supergaiters toes in two seasons. Landing on ones chest from a jump was also a bit hard on the back. But yes, it was a blast.

10:23 p.m. on January 10, 2013 (EST)
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ems makes a great back country sled that is tiny, has a little handle, and can be buckled right to your pack. Makes glissading easier on bad snow or on a slope that isn't steep enough. 

I've practiced self arrest, etc on pretty steep ski slopes and after summiting I glissaded down the ski slopes. I got going almost as fast as the skiers and my butt was on fire! 

11:18 p.m. on January 10, 2013 (EST)
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Growing up in a logging town that normally did not get snow very often, we used what we used in the summer on the lake.  Large truck inter-tubes.  Great fun, very fast, but no control at all.  

One time a friend went down the hill face down like the big kids, only he could not touch the ground with his feet, we were young and the tubes were Big!  Needless to say he had no control and was bouncing about at the bottom of the neighborhood hill and finally went into the ravine at the end of the lot.  Cut several holes in the tube from hitting branches and stuff, what was really funny was he walked a way from the trip with out a scratch!  No one was up for a repeat though.  :) 

To bad there is not less slopping hills around in the back country, most of the clear hills in this part of the country, at least in the back country, are close to a 60* slope.  NO Way I'm going down something like that in any kind of sled!  Beside at the bottom is rocks and trees!  The stopping part is going to hurt!

Wolf

Here is some of what I am talking about (this was Late July and still ready for sledding!


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6:55 a.m. on February 4, 2013 (EST)
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If you sled (and I'm a big fan), do it in good company... take turns.  Fractured my leg in two places (on NYE) in Northern Wisconsin.  I technically wasn't sledding - just watching the children - until I WAS.  Freak of an accident @4F and a long way from help....  Make sure there are two adults! and take turns so someone can effect rescue.  It was pretty damned uncomfortable WITH help.  Can't imagine what I'd do if all members of the "downhill team" got hurt at the same time.

9:36 a.m. on February 4, 2013 (EST)
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We got some snow over the weekend, so I was out sledding saturday morning and night, and Sunday morning again :) 
A couple teenagers built a ramp, which was pretty fun: 

Growing up, we would sled down the high wooded ridges behind my parents house, threading between the trunks, fallen logs, and rock outcroppings. No helmets or anything, just quick thinking and readiness to bail out at the last second, Ha! 

9:39 p.m. on April 2, 2013 (EDT)
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Has anyone heard from Abman47@excite.com?  He hasn't posted since last December.

12:17 p.m. on April 3, 2013 (EDT)
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GRowing up in New York state we used to make cheap sled by taking a sheet of simple plastic or a tarp and kneel on it and wrap it around us and away we'd go down the hill!

1:51 p.m. on April 11, 2013 (EDT)
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I live in Breckenridge and travel up near Steamboat Springs every few weeks to check on some cabins and do various maintenance for a friend. In the summer driving in is no problem but in the winter the last mile or so requires snowshoes. Earlier this year I stopped by Target and picked up a sled, some rope, a few pvc pipes and set out to making a worthy hauler for my wife & I. Sure we could probably pack in most of our stuff on our back but I am able to attach a cooler for food and drinks as well as our sleeping bags and packs. 


sled.jpg


sled2.jpg

The pvc pipes prevent the sled from coming up behind me when walking down hill, The ropes lead through the pipes to a basic tie off harness. I also drilled holes along the side rail in order to lace the rope holding down the gear.  I have since seen a much better plastic sled / toboggan at a hardware store in Steamboat for only $30 and it is much beefier and longer. The problems with the one I made are a couple. First of all the width of the front end. the shovel shape will sometimes allow it to dig in deep snow and it also does not like to travel in narrow track too well. The other issue is the length. If we are going to drag our gear in I would rather have it spread out lengthwise in order to keep the Center of Gravity lower. If we have a lot of gear we stack it on this sled which can lead to a tippy situation on the wrong kind of track. And Yes, when it is empty walking over to the closest slope is tempting. It still works well for people too.

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