WarmSkin

7:12 p.m. on February 20, 2013 (EST)
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We recently had a skin protectant cream recommended to us for use in extreme cold and windy conditions, named WarmSkin. The company that produces it is Aurora, and is located in Minnesota. As far as I can determine, there are no stores here in California that carry it (the Aurora lists only stores in the upper midwest). The price and shipping that Aurora wants on their website seems a bit on the extravagant side.

Question 1 - have any of you had experience with WarmSkin (under what conditions)?

Q2 - for those in NorCalifornia, do you know a shop that carries it?

7:21 p.m. on February 20, 2013 (EST)
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I havent, but have seen some older guys smear grease or rendered animal fat on their faces. The old school ice fisherman swear by it, the smell keeps me from trying it. I have also seen eskimos smear seal blubber on their faces and hands, only on tv tho. I think my hands stay warmer if I use lotion or badger balm before I go out in the cold.

7:27 p.m. on February 20, 2013 (EST)
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Let's keep the thread specifically on the WarmSkin product. Various things like "home remedies", sunblocks, aloe vera, skin lotions, etc have some effect, but I am specifically asking about the WarmSkin product, because of some miraculous properties ascribed to it.

11:08 a.m. on February 21, 2013 (EST)
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Sorry to be off topic, I guess, I thought I was being helpful. Anyway, the price is still high, but there is a distributor in ct that offers free shipping on warmskin. Thats the best I can find after searching the web for an hr.

11:35 a.m. on February 21, 2013 (EST)
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When I run and it is damp and the temperature is on the line between wearing tights or shorts I put on a layer of bag balm and wear shorts.  It makes water bead lessening evaporation. It is of some use but I don't know how it would work under clothes.

7:06 p.m. on February 21, 2013 (EST)
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Sigh! Bag balm is not WarmSkin. I asked about the specific product WarmSkin. I specified extreme cold and windy conditions. If you are out in tights or shorts, you are not in extreme cold and windy conditions (OK, yeah, the cover girl in the current Sports Illustrated was wearing a bikini and less in Antarctica, which is closer to extreme cold and windy conditions - and she got hypothermic, too). Extreme cold begins at 0°F and lower, and windy starts at 30 knots. My avatar photo was in mild conditions (in Antarctica), roughly -5 to -10°F. and breezes 10 knots or so.

Please stick to your personal experience with the WarmSkin product. If you have used something else (like the seal blubber or rendered animal fat mentioned above), that is offtopic. If you have no personal experience specifically with WarmSkin, don't post in this thread. 

6:16 a.m. on February 22, 2013 (EST)
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Gee Bill sorry to have wasted so much of your valuable time, a thousand pardons.  I think you should buy the Warm Skin with DEET as you seem to have issues with insects and orifices.

For those with an IQ above extreme cold, the point I was making is that an oil layer may provide a little help with evaporation cooling but the WarmSkin info does not go into detail on how it works.   I could speculate on ways it might work but I'll save that for a more civil discussion.

2:28 p.m. on February 22, 2013 (EST)
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Sorry you took offense at my asking you to follow Community Guideline #6

Stay on topic. Be constructive.
Do not repeat the same points over and over ad nauseam, but contribute positively and help move conversations forward. Use the Off-Topic Forum for non-backcountry topics. Start a new thread in the appropriate forum when necessary.

Note that I said "please stay on topic". I asked a specific question about a specific product. Yeah, I know about use of seal blubber, lard, and other kinds of grease, fat, and oil to help retain heat. After all, the Channel swimmers famously use those things for their English Channel swims. I have used lard and Crisco myself for distance swims in Sierra lakes and other cold water swims.

I note that you also appear to not be following Guideline #9. At this point, it appears that I will not be getting an on-topic response, so I will invoke Guideline #10, and ask the Moderators to delete this topic, please.

2:37 p.m. on February 22, 2013 (EST)
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Since it has gone OT and threatened with deletion, I will say what first struck me about the ingredients: they don't look that different from a typical aloe moisturiser cream. It would be interesting to find out exactly what is going on with the ingredients, besides the fragrance and any fillers, preservatives, etc.

And the video on the site begs the question of the already efficacious use of petroleum jelly, though I would rather put an aloe and alcohol cream on my skin than petrol-derivatives.

3:06 p.m. on February 22, 2013 (EST)
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Pathloser I was thinking the same thing.  With out more information I can't see how it would work noticeable better petroleum jelly.  As I noted in my original post  I only limited use for such things.  In fact looking at the warmskin information it says that it "serves as a barrier to prevent water loss."  Either that is a moisturizer or it is blocking sweat glands.

3:26 p.m. on February 22, 2013 (EST)
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Pathloser,

I agree on your assessment of the ingredients, which is why I asked for comments from people who have really used it (not the list of "testimonials" - too many testimonials, whether magic lotions, "the great new sleeping bag/tent/car/etc I just bought", or some other thing that "I opened the box and it's the greatest thing ever." I should have added "used it long term and under conditions below 0°F with winds over 20-30 kts".

Some of the ingredients are well-known for what they do - aloe vera and lanolin (aka "sheep fat) for two. Several others are some kind of chemical, while others are apparently just perfumes, plus some solvents.

4:26 p.m. on February 22, 2013 (EST)
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Lanolin doesn't show up much in moisturisers, it's very greasy and causes some allergies. I used to use a cream with a lot in for seborrheic dermatitis made by the Austrian company Bioforce. Now I find Body Shop is the best (apart from the completely natural products such as Aubrey Organics) and that's probably due to the high Aloe Vera content. I would have said that the natural emollients are overpriced except for the fact that brands like Clinique, which are based on petrol/paraffin, have people paying even more!

I think you could only get athletes putting a ton of face cream on their limbs if you gave it a name that sounded, er, technical.

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