Is this poison ivy?

11:12 a.m. on May 8, 2013 (EDT)
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Found this on some family property.  Wondering if I should kill it all:


20130505_145038.jpg

It seems too tall to be poison ivy, it has stems as thick as a pencil.  I only ever see it with really spindly stems next to the ground.

Another view, berries?
20130505_145034.jpg

11:43 a.m. on May 8, 2013 (EDT)
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Poison Ivy is found much further south from where I now live, but I have come into contact with it in Ontario. I used to get urushiol injections as a kid to increase my immunity, but I still had a minor reaction.

From my recollection, it is more of a vine than a shrub as indicated by the photo. The berries of Poison Ivy are usually white or grey in colour and reach maturity in the fall.

The range can be more indicative of species types; where did you see it? And what time of year?

12:35 p.m. on May 8, 2013 (EDT)
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have your wife run through it and check her in a couple of days! just kidding......sure looks like poison Ivy!

12:56 p.m. on May 8, 2013 (EDT)
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North, I saw this stuff last Sunday in Eastern Washington.

Olemike, you read my mind but I was fresh out of volunteers, I didn't even have a dog with me that day.  I, of course, being the test administrator would need to stay out of the suspect material to retain my objectivity in the study. 

1:13 p.m. on May 8, 2013 (EDT)
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Usually one or more of the leaves in the three-leaf set will have notches on only one side of the leaf.  It would be unusually for an entire plant not to have that characteristic on at least some of the leaves.

In any event, neither pic looks like poison ivy to me.

1:39 p.m. on May 8, 2013 (EDT)
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newer poison ivy leaves have the reddish hue; older ones don't and aren't as shiny.  some have the notching nogods mentioned, others do not.  Poison ivy definitely gets those berries.  i'm betting that is, indeed, poison ivy.  enough that i wouldn't walk around in it in shorts. 

check out some photos:  http://www.poison-ivy.org/index.htm

 

 

 

1:48 p.m. on May 8, 2013 (EDT)
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I'll agree with leadbelly. PI is quite variable and can be anything from a ground cover low shrub to a climbing vine. Although the leaflets lack the diagnostic notch mentioned by nogoods, the red coloration, oily appearance, white berries in  the second photo, and growth habit all point to PI.

Good thing you didn't have a dog -- they can run through it, pick up the oil, then transfer it to you. But I don't think dogs react to it.

2:14 p.m. on May 8, 2013 (EDT)
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Western poison ivy is a shrub that cane grow to 3 meters, but typically can be around 3 feet. It has berries. Looks like western PI to me, though the lack of notches in the leaves might point a different direction.

3:30 p.m. on May 8, 2013 (EDT)
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I saw this stuff last Sunday in Eastern Washington

 

Poison Ivy berries should have dropped off by now. Even so, it is better to err on the side of caution; if in doubt don't touch it.

7:16 p.m. on May 8, 2013 (EDT)
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Sure looks like a variety of poison ivy to me. Berries are typically beginning to form this time of year. If you had an early spring/ warm period that may be why it has berries already. Berries typically appear in late spring and early summer through fall.

8:15 a.m. on May 9, 2013 (EDT)
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Yes. It's poison ivy. The first picture made me wonder, but the second pic is a sight I see regularly.

Poison ivy can appear as a small plant, creeping vine, or even a bush. I once cleared a hiking trail of a bush that stood 7' tall.

10:31 a.m. on May 9, 2013 (EDT)
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I also am fairly certain it is a variety of Poison Ivy, of which there are many. Some around here is a low creeping vine, with smooth edged leave that only occasionally display notches. Others develop massive thick hairy vines on trees, while others grow as dense mounded shrubs.

There are slight characteristics of the ones in your photos that are less common, but the upright growing behavior is very common in rocky environs. The oil surface, straight leaf veins, reddish tinge on new leaves, treble compound leaf, extended stem of the distal leaflet, stem-proximal berry clusters, etc., all strongly suggest a type of Toxicodendron radicans

11:08 a.m. on May 9, 2013 (EDT)
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gonzan, I think that since Sage is just east of the Cascade Crest, this variety would be Toxicodendron rydbergii, or Western Poison Ivy. The Eastern Poison Ivy that you mention does not grow west of the Rockies, is more commonly vine like, rather than the bush of the western variety. Beautiful plant, it is native to the Americas, but more widespread now because of soil disturbance.

11:10 a.m. on May 9, 2013 (EDT)
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I had no idea it had so many different morphologies! I was only about 65% sure it was PI. Now I'm 100%.

Thanks team! 

I have only seen it as a spindly, creeping ground cover. 

The embarrassing part is that I have a degree in agriculture with an emphasis on plant science!  I have always done really well on plant ID but this is one I never encountered growing up near Seattle. 

Being a commercial orchard, I'm pretty sure I can round up something in a backpack sprayer to take care of this stuff.  Usually I'm a live and let live guy but I really don't want this stuff getting on to my kids when we climb.  I can be pretty selective with what I spray so the other plants can fill in the space after the PI is dead. 

1:17 p.m. on May 9, 2013 (EDT)
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Thanks for the Clarification, Erich, I am always eager to refine my identification and classification knowledge. 

I wonder how much study has been given to the variations seen in different regions? There are some pretty dramatic differences in the plants here in the  Southeast, some of which is certainly just due to age, variance in localized conditions, and soil composition, but I am am fairly certain there must be sub-speciation as well. 

7:23 p.m. on May 9, 2013 (EDT)
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Often plants have amazing small localities, along the lines that gonzan mentions with regard to variations. Between Seattle and Everett and mostly west of Interstate 5, is a relaltively small area that supports a number of healthy native Western White Pine. Go north or east or south a few miles, and there are none. Often such things have to do with micro climates. Unfortunately many of the Western White Pines in the west have succumbed to blister rust infestation.

The San Juan Islands also have populations of native cactus that I have seen bloom, and this within 50 miles of an area that is classed as a temperate rain forest.

Sage, no reason to be embarrassed as no native populations of Western Poison Ivy grow west of the Cascade Crest. We have some poison oak, but it too, is limited on the western side of the state. I have seen a few of the latter in Des Moines and Tacoma, in places where the soil is well drained and there is a lot of sun.

7:48 p.m. on May 9, 2013 (EDT)
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DPP_Moultrie_Passage_20063.jpg
This is the species I see all the time in South Carolina, very distinct primary & secondary lobes.

Toxicodendren radicans

I wouldn't have recognized Sage's photo as PI.

8:23 p.m. on May 9, 2013 (EDT)
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FromSagetoSnow said:

North, I saw this stuff last Sunday in Eastern Washington.

Olemike, you read my mind but I was fresh out of volunteers, I didn't even have a dog with me that day.  I, of course, being the test administrator would need to stay out of the suspect material to retain my objectivity in the study. 

 The dog won't get the rash, and horse can eat the stuff and it IS the stuff! Kill it all, but don't burn it. if you burn it you will inhale the oils and that will really give you and anyone else a real bad hair day.

Now if you send the dog into it and then pet the dog you will get it but the dog won't.

8:24 p.m. on May 9, 2013 (EDT)
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here in socal we get poison oak a lot, no poison ivy. good to see pictures for reference.

8:32 p.m. on May 9, 2013 (EDT)
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PI grows anywhere horses have been. In the east it will be a low plant, a bush plant and vines that will cover a tree like English Ivy. i used to work in the stuff in purpose to kill it, and take trees that were covered in it.

trouthunter that is another form and is usually called poision oak.

Several years ago during Laconia Bike Week I witnessed a group of people that set up chairs in the bush type alongside the road to watch bikes go by.

(35,000 bikes at once is a big deal here)

I stopped and told them to pack it up and go take showers with green or yellow soap.... I am sure still some of them were more than miserable.

9:06 a.m. on May 10, 2013 (EDT)
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A guy I was on a field course with learned that you can ID some trees (for example cherries) by scratching or chewing on a twig and sniffing for a characteristic smell. So we were out in a bog and he found a poison sumac (close relative of PI, equally bad)...

Fortunately he didn't seen to react. Coulda been real bad.

11:04 a.m. on May 10, 2013 (EDT)
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I second the reference to poison oak in California - Northern and Southern.  A long time ago, I spent the better part of a week hiking and bushwhacking around Mt. Tam and areas near Stinson Beach.  A week later, i had poison oak rashes break out all over my legs, arms, neck and face.  worst case i have ever had, needed oral steroids to get it under control. 

7:02 p.m. on May 10, 2013 (EDT)
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leadbelly2550 said:

I second the reference to poison oak in California - Northern and Southern.  A long time ago, I spent the better part of a week hiking and bushwhacking around Mt. Tam and areas near Stinson Beach.  A week later, i had poison oak rashes break out all over my legs, arms, neck and face.  worst case i have ever had, needed oral steroids to get it under control. 

 Something like that happens at the primitive events I attend. Most often the land used to hold these is govt land of one sort or another. Usually the land has been disturbed.

 Then to make the are some what presentable it get brush hogged. That makes it impossible to see if there is PI which most often there is and we end up covered in  the stuff.

9:57 a.m. on August 7, 2013 (EDT)
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Here in Manitoba, our poison ivy has very jagged leaves and it grows low to the ground.

But it also has a reddish tint (sometimes) and also grows in bunches of 3 leaves.

 

"leaves of three, let them be".

July 25, 2014
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