Favorite river hikes...

11:43 a.m. on June 30, 2014 (EDT)
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By bike...or walking...what is your favorite river hike?

What I like to do is hike along rivers, not just because I am close to water, but because the foliage is so lush and you can fish...the list goes on an on.  So...what river trails do you like to hike?

Snakey

1:37 p.m. on June 30, 2014 (EDT)
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awww man....

here in the southeast---the list could be endless.....

north fork of citico....south fork of citico.......snowbird creek.........bald river........eagle creek......deep creek.....forney creek.........little river......noland creek.....hazel creek......

all of those have been logged, so the lower portions along the creeks are along old roadbeds and generally have minimal elevation gain........and most, one can find artifacts of the logging days still along the trails........

i have not fished any of those---but tons of other people do...

8:20 p.m. on June 30, 2014 (EDT)
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in law school, I did a lot of hiking adjacent to the Mississippi & St. Croix rivers.  there are a lot of state parks along those rivers, great trails.

around here, I live about a 10 minute walk from the Potomac River that bounds Maryland and Virginia.  Both sides have good trails.  I live on the Maryland side; we have three somewhat disjointed trails, Billy Goat A, B, and C, all of which are reasonably interesting, with A having the most interesting topography in my opinion.  I hike those trails all the time. 

10:22 p.m. on June 30, 2014 (EDT)
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I did one in Colorado that was awesome.  It was the Poudre River and the trail wound along side the river and the views were stunning.  

6:33 a.m. on July 1, 2014 (EDT)
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I would have to say that the list is darn near endless for me too! Here in the NE most all of the trails in my area follow small rivers and streams for long stretches.

However, I would have to say that hands down my favorite one so far has been Oak Creek Canyon in Sedona AZ. Was out there last year for vacation and I had some truly amazing hikes out there.

8:00 a.m. on July 1, 2014 (EDT)
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TheRambler said:

I would have to say that the list is darn near endless for me too! Here in the NE most all of the trails in my area follow small rivers and streams for long stretches.

However, I would have to say that hands down my favorite one so far has been Oak Creek Canyon in Sedona AZ. Was out there last year for vacation and I had some truly amazing hikes out there.

 Ken that is good to hear! My wife and i are going there in October this year. Did you push beyond the developed trail in Oak Creek Canyon? Or re-stated: how far would you reccomend going?

11:28 a.m. on July 1, 2014 (EDT)
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The educational organization I work for has a campuses in New Zealand and there is stunning river hike near our campus that we always take our students on. I've done it many times and it never gets old. 

Sawcut Gorge and Isolated Creek Trail in the Southern Marlborough region. 

The trail is a combination of beside the river and in the river with some ideal deep swimming holes along the way and a scenic gorge to walk through. The gorge is typically the spot to stop, eat lunch and turn around, although the trail does continue into higher elevations and leads to a backcountry hut. The gorge is 500 feet high and in some spots, only 6 feet wide. Total round-trip with some swimming break and lunch in the gorge is about 5 hours, so it's a nice day-hike for the group. 


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A student stops to look up while hiking in Sawcut Gorge. It's hard to tell because the water is so clear, but she is ankle-deep, which is typically in late summer. 


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The trail meanders through the river a number of times before getting to the gorge. Sturdy footwear and a hot summer day is all you need to enjoy this hike. A swimsuit is also helpful to have for the deep swimming holes along the way.

8:02 p.m. on July 1, 2014 (EDT)
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Patman, i honestly hiked all over the place for a week straight from 4am-noon everyday. Was out there in Sedona with the wife, kid, and the inlaws so i rose early every morning and went hiking. I must have hiked 30-40 different trails in the area and all of them were great, but it was so hot that i really enjoyed the cool water of the different streams in the canyons. I just looked at the map and picked a couple random trails every morning. The maps are all over the place, other than that you will just need a parking pass from the ranger station or one of the many kiosks in town or at the trailheads(some)

9:06 a.m. on July 2, 2014 (EDT)
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Buckskin Gulch in southwest Utah.


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Narrow slot canyon of Buckskin Gulch is listed as the longest narrows in the USA. Averages about as wide as a hallway or doorway and is 13 miles in length.


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Logs travel down its canyon in the monsoon seasonal rains and when the water drops they get stuck and await the next flood to come by and rescue them or dry rot to fall into the canyon.


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See the ant man in the bottom?


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Hikers pass through into the Wire Pass entrance in the northwest section.


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Formed after millions of years of sand dunes petrified into stone then wind,rain and time have worn the canyons narrow passages into corridors of layers of ancient sand.

Hiking is good any time of the year, though spring and fall are my favorites. The canyon narrows can be cold in winter when the suns lower southern angle does not get into the depths. Summer is nice while in the depths until one reaches the ends. Just beware during the rainy season of July/August. They say a flood rushing down the canyon sounds like a freight train coming down. The southern Paiute Indians called these canyons Parunuweap meaning Roaring Canyon.

Buckskin Gulch starts out shallow with walls about 100 feet high and ends at the confluence with the Paria with a depth of about 500 feet or more. Every hiking time /season is different as the water washes away old log jams, boulder fields and makes new water holes to wade through in thick milkshake like pools.


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More information at: http://www.americansouthwest.net/slot_canyons/buckskin_gulch/canyon.html 

I have seen everything from fallen big horn sheep to jackrabbits,coyotes, deer and snakes that have ventured into the canyon and got caught in a flood. The big horn appeared to have tried to leap across the rim above and missed the other side.

2:07 p.m. on July 2, 2014 (EDT)
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I love rivers and spend a lot of time on them but usually paddling or rowing. It is one of the grandest ways to travel in the outdoors. Next up is a week on the Willamette River, OR which is currently running at about 13,000 cfs.

8:56 a.m. on July 3, 2014 (EDT)
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These are my pictures from September 2008 when a friend and I hiked down Buckskin Gulch: http://www.trailspace.com/forums/trip-reports/topics/71079.html One of my first trip reports here at Trailspace.

1:14 p.m. on July 3, 2014 (EDT)
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The JMT out of Florence Lake up into Evolution Basin or Goddard Canyon both have pretty grand Sierra scenery.  In fact the Evolution Valley leg of the JMT and parts further on are considered some of the best scenery along the entire JMT.  The trails are often within earshot, or closer, to the rivers and streams en route.  The fishing isn't too bad either.

Ed

1:51 p.m. on July 3, 2014 (EDT)
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An interesting day hike is in the San Gabriel Mountains, above Los Angeles.  The hike is known as the Bridge to Nowhere.  It closely follows the East Fork San Gabriel River.  The WPA built most of the local mountain roads during the Great Depression.  This particular roadway was washed out by flash floods before the route was completed.  The WPA subsequently abandoned the project.  Nowadays very little remains of the road. 

The trail follows the stream up canyon, eventually climbing to the ridge line of the mountain chain.  Most, however, limit travel to the first three miles of the trail, meanwhile crossing the stream 23 boot soaking times (last time I hiked it).  At mile three there is this wonderful period concrete arch bridge spanning the gorge - in the middle of nowhere - hence its name.  There is no connecting road on either side of the bridge, just the bridge and wilderness.  The bridge is in really good shape; it looks more like a sculpture than roadway infrastructure, given its setting.

Ed

   

2:16 p.m. on July 3, 2014 (EDT)
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Another wonderful water side hike is along the Virgin River in Zion Canyon. Some portions are along paved foot trails, on the bench just above the river.  But other portions the river has no marked trails running along its course.  These are the gems, as few people bother exiting their vehicles along these portions.  And there are dirt trails along these tracts - trust me on this.  You will have to put up with the back ground noise of tram buses plying the route to The Narrows, but it is worth the distraction, considering the settings.

I think the best segment for a stroll is between the Weeping Rock parking area, up stream to the parking lot at the Temple of Sinawava (entrance to the Narrows).  For those not wishing to hike the steep paths leading up onto the canyon rims this excursion is about the best alternative in the gorge.  There are wild turkey and deer to be had; and even beaver if you are stealthy and lucky.  It is senior, child, and city slicker friendly.  Take a picnic.  And don't forget your camera!

5:37 p.m. on July 3, 2014 (EDT)
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Whomeworry, if you like the Zion Narrows, you should try what called the Little brother of the Zion Narrows. Go to Checkerboard Mesa neat the east Entrance, hike up and over the Checkerboard Pass, its just south of the number 9 on the east highway where the road turns south then head west again: http://www.mappingsupport.com/p/gmap4.php?ll=37.226089,-112.878293&z=15&t=t4 

Then hike down and into the East Fork of the Virgin River and hike upstream or east through what is called the Parunuweap or Barracks. You can hike all the way 12 miles to highway 89 between Mount Carmel and Kanab Utah. The East Fork narrows are very impressive as well and see less than 10 people a day and no permit is needed for over night hikes. 

You can also drive to the junction of hwy 89 and state 9 at Mount Carmel and then 1/4 mile down towards Kanab where the East fork crosses 89 and then drive downstream to the mouth of Monument Canyon park under big Cottonwood trees and then hike down the Parunuweap (Southern Paiute for Roaring Canyon) The Barracks section is very narrow with high 1000 foot walls of the White Cliffs. The walls of these cliffs are actually this high from the start on highway 89 all the way to the park boundary.

See the Trip report I did about Parunuweap Canyon at this link: http://www.trailspace.com/forums/trip-reports/topics/147126.html 

There are many easy to explore side canyons off both sides of the Parunuweap as well.

6:57 p.m. on July 3, 2014 (EDT)
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GaryPalmer said:

Whomeworry, if you like the Zion Narrows...

Thanks Garry, for the recommendation.

Actually I am no fan of the Narrows, the Subway, or other tourist destination slot canyon routes that have me wading through water for any distance.  Furthermore those "trails" are crowded with bucket list Nazis out to put another notch in their hiking staffs.

But you say the route you suggest is low traffic.  Is it also dry?

Ed 

12:24 a.m. on July 4, 2014 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

GaryPalmer said:

Whomeworry, if you like the Zion Narrows...

are crowded with bucket list Nazis out to put another notch in their hiking staffs.

 I have to ask....Bucket List Nazis??

8:41 a.m. on July 4, 2014 (EDT)
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No it is not dry, but not as wide or deep as the Zion narrows. It averages about as wide as the deep creek narrows between the highway below Mt Carmel Jct and the area called the Barracks where the creek bed narrows to about 5 feet wide, but the walking part is still about 20 feet wide. The water is only deep in sections where it has washed up against the sandstone cliffs going around sharp corners. There is quicksand areas in these places as well, but not too bad.

The main Parunuweap is the narrows and there are nice side canyons like Mineral, Meadow,Poverty and other un-named ones. Like in Zion the canyons tend to run along the fault lines often running in straight lines for miles.

There is a warm springs near where the trail/route comes in from Checkerboard Mesa at the East Fork and a plaque that commemorates when the John W Powell expedition came through. 

Right on the Zion border along the river is a nice water falls as well.

10:13 a.m. on July 4, 2014 (EDT)
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Nice photos by Gary. I like the Paria River in Arizona.

4:03 p.m. on July 4, 2014 (EDT)
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Hiking along the Dudh Kosi to Everest Base camp is great. It means THE MILK RIVER. You cross it several times on suspension bridges and are along it, climbing up from it our down to it much of the trek.


The river is extreme white water and normally it cannot be used for watersports. The first kayak trip was made in 1976 by a British expedition under the leadership of Mike Jones.

6:53 p.m. on July 6, 2014 (EDT)
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Snakey said:

 I have to ask....Bucket List Nazis??

Folks that do things because it is the hip/status/keeping up with the Jones thing to do.  They climb Everest and do the JMT because these escapades make for cool cocktail party stories and bragging rights, etc.  Often they don't even enjoy these activities!  That is the bucket list mentality.  I refer to some as Nazis, because the more adamant of the bucket list crowd are more concerned with checking these items off on their list as "been-there-done-that" than bothering to actually experience the activity.  They do not stop and smell the flowers.  And You are just another obstacle in their way between points A & B while on the trail.  My judgment and terminology may be harsh, but I have been on too many trips with folks of this ilk.  I bring a watch backcountry to schedule my meds, not time my water break.

Don't get me wrong, having goals and aspirations are fine, but when you run much of your life accordingly, or you let society program you into considering what belongs on the list, then I think it deters from a life well lived.

Ed

11:03 a.m. on July 7, 2014 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

Snakey said:

 I have to ask....Bucket List Nazis??

Folks that do things because it is the hip/status/keeping up with the Jones thing to do.  They climb Everest and do the JMT because these escapades make for cool cocktail party stories and bragging rights, etc.  Often they don't even enjoy these activities!  That is the bucket list mentality.  I refer to some as Nazis, because the more adamant of the bucket list crowd are more concerned with checking these items off on their list as "been-there-done-that" than bothering to actually experience the activity.  They do not stop and smell the flowers.  And You are just another obstacle in their way between points A & B while on the trail.  My judgment and terminology may be harsh, but I have been on too many trips with folks of this ilk.  I bring a watch backcountry to schedule my meds, not time my water break.

Don't get me wrong, having goals and aspirations are fine, but when you run much of your life accordingly, or you let society program you into considering what belongs on the list, then I think it deters from a life well lived.

Ed

 Well said...

I understand....in Colorado the "thing" is to climb all of the 13ers (or 14ers I forget which) and it is what you say.  Hoards ascend those slops every year and most do not enjoy the experience, but rather a smug bragging right to say they did. 

11:11 a.m. on July 7, 2014 (EDT)
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Whome brings up an interesting point. There have always been a class of tourists that collects photos of themselves in front of well known landmarks. Outdoor people do it too. It matters not what motivates people to get outdoors.

A friend told me an interesting story about his collection of garden gnomes in the likenesses of the Seven Dwarfs. One day his Dopey was missing. He forgot about it after awhile and just got by with 6 dwarves. Then one day at the end of the summer Dopey returned. He had an envelope around his neck on a piece of string. In side it were pictures of Dopey on vacation. He had visited the Grand Canyon, the Redwoods, and Yellowstone among others. For some people it is all about the photos and posting them somewhere.

 

5:41 p.m. on July 7, 2014 (EDT)
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ppine that is hilarious! Did he ever find out who did it?

10:59 p.m. on July 7, 2014 (EDT)
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Snakey,

It's the 14ers that are highly sought after.

8:36 a.m. on July 8, 2014 (EDT)
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ppine, I once read about some guys who carried a red couch everywhere and photographed just it in various places. And I have a friend who carries a little toy jeep and places it in his photos of places he has been.

11:06 a.m. on July 8, 2014 (EDT)
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rob5073 said:

Snakey,

It's the 14ers that are highly sought after.

 Yeah that's it....14ers.  I have to say that I did meet a family that did those and their kids complained every time.  Funny thing was, it got them outdoors and when they did complete them, it had changed the kids outlook.  They all now backpack all the time. 

11:08 p.m. on July 8, 2014 (EDT)
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Snakey said:

rob5073 said:

Snakey,

It's the 14ers that are highly sought after.

 Yeah that's it....14ers.  I have to say that I did meet a family that did those and their kids complained every time.  Funny thing was, it got them outdoors and when they did complete them, it had changed the kids outlook.  They all now backpack all the time. 

 I'm gonna try my hand at the 14er game but the problem is I fear that once I climb my first 14er, I'm going to climb the others as well.  I should have been doing this when I lived in CO, but, I was too interested in mtn biking back then.

October 23, 2014
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