Anyone used the Army dome tent?

11:53 a.m. on June 7, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Brian Chia

Has anyone used the US Army dome tent? According to the website I saw it on:

"The tent is made to military specifications requiring that the it be operable from -25 degrees to 120 degrees F and withstand 65 MPH wind gusts as well as to repel wind driven rain at two inches per hour with 20 MPH wind. The required snow load is 4 lbs per square foot. The tent features a lightweight rip-stop nylon Woodland Camo body that is breathable to reduce condensation, rustproof zippers, front and rear zippered doors with seperate zippered mesh insect screens, a urethane coated waterproof floor, mesh storage pockets on each side wall, an upper gear loft, 24 aluminum tent stakes, component stuff bags and additional reinforcement at all stress points. There's also a snow tunnel opening that can be sealed off or used to interconnect with another tent. The tent includes a two fly system; the Woodland Camo fly completely covers the tent all the way to the ground for weatherproofing and added warmth and has the capability of creating an additional 30 square feet of vestibule area for extra gear storage that is held in place by 3 pole sections, while the Arctic white snow fly offers full camo coverage in snow territory. The tent measures 7'8" x 7'8" with a 51" center height, weight is 20 lbs."


Sounds pretty nice but a used one at $800 is ridiculous. Anyone know why they are so expensive?

1:36 p.m. on July 13, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

From what I understand (and I could be wrong) Eureka does allot of the manufacture of the US Military tents. I think that one of the reasons that the Military type tents are going to be so expencive is that they have to be made just that much tougher than standard backpacking fare. I'd wadger to say that short of our caving friends (and perhaps the boy scouts) noone is harder on gear than the US Military.

Some of the features that I've seen in the Eureka Military line are: 7000-series aluminum frame. The combat tent incorporates a vapor permeable tent body with a waterproof floor and rainfly. The rainfly is reversible Loden green and Tan. w/ fastpack option.

So hence the high price tag.. But why would you want to shlep a 20 pound dome tent anyhow??? If you need your tent to survive 65mph winds why not go with the Eureka 5th season or one of the other 4 season mountaineering tents on the market. If nothing else they will be much easier to get replacement parts for.


Quote:

Has anyone used the US Army dome tent? According to the website I saw it on:

"The tent is made to military specifications requiring that the it be operable from -25 degrees to 120 degrees F and withstand 65 MPH wind gusts as well as to repel wind driven rain at two inches per hour with 20 MPH wind. The required snow load is 4 lbs per square foot. The tent features a lightweight rip-stop nylon Woodland Camo body that is breathable to reduce condensation, rustproof zippers, front and rear zippered doors with seperate zippered mesh insect screens, a urethane coated waterproof floor, mesh storage pockets on each side wall, an upper gear loft, 24 aluminum tent stakes, component stuff bags and additional reinforcement at all stress points. There's also a snow tunnel opening that can be sealed off or used to interconnect with another tent. The tent includes a two fly system; the Woodland Camo fly completely covers the tent all the way to the ground for weatherproofing and added warmth and has the capability of creating an additional 30 square feet of vestibule area for extra gear storage that is held in place by 3 pole sections, while the Arctic white snow fly offers full camo coverage in snow territory. The tent measures 7'8" x 7'8" with a 51" center height, weight is 20 lbs."


Sounds pretty nice but a used one at $800 is ridiculous. Anyone know why they are so expensive?

8:42 p.m. on July 23, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

I have not used one or seen one when I was in the Army (Infantry) and I am not sure who the hell in the military would actually use one. We tried to go as lite as possible and our packs still were heavy as hell. If it is anything like the rest of the military gear, it will function but you can find a nicer, lighter more comfortable tent elsewhere. I have an ID MK3 and I think it kicks ass! It is only like 5lbs+ but it can hold up in some serious winds. If I was you, I would stay clear of military gear at all cost!

October 20, 2014
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