VORTEX QUESTION

1:35 p.m. on December 6, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Brancher, brancher

I have a chance to get a 'new' Kelty Vortex at a very attractive price. Here's the rub: the Vortex that's available is a 1999 Vortex, but has been hanging around the shop for a couple of years. No box, but has never been used.

The shop owner told me the tent would have suffered no ill effects such as aging, cracking, or brittleness from being three years old and sitting on a shelf....

Questions:
1. Are there any significant differences between the '99 Vortexes and the ones today (2002)?
2. Would a '99 have suffered any damage or weakness like dryrot, etc, from hanging around in storage for that period of time?

Thanks! I would appreciate any comments from this forum.

sc

11:02 p.m. on December 8, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Quote:

I have a chance to get a 'new' Kelty Vortex at a very attractive price. Here's the rub: the Vortex that's available is a 1999 Vortex, but has been hanging around the shop for a couple of years. No box, but has never been used.

I bought a Vortex 4 in 1998, and it has held up well. If the store one has been stored properly (dry, not too hot) it should be as good as new. I have camping gear from the 1980's whose waterproof coating has become sticky or worn off, but those have either been improperly stored (wet and warm) or been subject to a lot of use. Also the quality of coatings has improved since then. The nylon fabric of a tent is harmed by long exposure to sunlight, which shouldn't be a problem with the store tent. About the only other thing that might be damaged with time is the rubber in the pole shockcords if there is a lot of ozone in the air (e.g. Los Angles smog from the 1970s).

My tent has a nylon rain fly. More recent Vortex models have polyester flys, along with vents, and even photoreactive windows. Condensation can be something of a problem with a tent like this with a full coverage rain fly. The vents add ventilation, and the polyester fly doesn't sag when if gets wet. I don't know, though, when Kelty made these changes.

You might check the Campmor catalog to see if they are still selling earlier models of this tent. That may give you an idea of when changes were made, and how much of a price break is reasonable for an older version.

Paul

9:07 a.m. on December 9, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Brancher, brancher

Thanks --
I checked with Campmor already, they don't list a Vortex, just the V-2 model (same general tent, different sleeve design).

Rather than second-guessing the condition of the older Vortex, I think I'll just bite the bullet and go for a new one - REI shows its 'Clipper' model at a giveaway price right now - $99.00 - this tent has gotten good press and looks perfect for my kayak's small hatches)....

thx again.

Quote:

Quote:

I have a chance to get a 'new' Kelty Vortex at a very attractive price. Here's the rub: the Vortex that's available is a 1999 Vortex, but has been hanging around the shop for a couple of years. No box, but has never been used.

I bought a Vortex 4 in 1998, and it has held up well. If the store one has been stored properly (dry, not too hot) it should be as good as new. I have camping gear from the 1980's whose waterproof coating has become sticky or worn off, but those have either been improperly stored (wet and warm) or been subject to a lot of use. Also the quality of coatings has improved since then. The nylon fabric of a tent is harmed by long exposure to sunlight, which shouldn't be a problem with the store tent. About the only other thing that might be damaged with time is the rubber in the pole shockcords if there is a lot of ozone in the air (e.g. Los Angles smog from the 1970s).

My tent has a nylon rain fly. More recent Vortex models have polyester flys, along with vents, and even photoreactive windows. Condensation can be something of a problem with a tent like this with a full coverage rain fly. The vents add ventilation, and the polyester fly doesn't sag when if gets wet. I don't know, though, when Kelty made these changes.

You might check the Campmor catalog to see if they are still selling earlier models of this tent. That may give you an idea of when changes were made, and how much of a price break is reasonable for an older version.

Paul

11:07 a.m. on December 9, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Quote:

Rather than second-guessing the condition of the older Vortex, I think I'll just bite the bullet and go for a new one - REI shows its 'Clipper' model at a giveaway price right now - $99.00 - this tent has gotten good press and looks perfect for my kayak's small hatches)....

I got a Kelty Zen for about that price a few years ago. As with the Vortex the newer ones have the polyester fly and vent. It would probably fit through your hatches. Of course, with any of these tents, you have the option of packing the poles, tent body, and fly separately. In fact, if it is wet, it may be a good idea to pack the fly separately to keep the rest dry.

Another thing that I have found handy is an awning. That is, a tarp that can be rigged over the opening, to provide shelter from rain, while keeping the tent fly open. It provides better ventilation, and provides a dry place to take off boots, etc. A while back I got a Walrus 'lanai' (front porch) from Campmor that fits over both my tents. Eurkea has a similar item, though I don't know how adaptable it is.

Paul

2:56 p.m. on December 9, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Brancher, brancher

Quote:

Quote:

Rather than second-guessing the condition of the older Vortex, I think I'll just bite the bullet and go for a new one - REI shows its 'Clipper' model at a giveaway price right now - $99.00 - this tent has gotten good press and looks perfect for my kayak's small hatches)....

I got a Kelty Zen for about that price a few years ago. As with the Vortex the newer ones have the polyester fly and vent. It would probably fit through your hatches. Of course, with any of these tents, you have the option of packing the poles, tent body, and fly separately. In fact, if it is wet, it may be a good idea to pack the fly separately to keep the rest dry.

Another thing that I have found handy is an awning. That is, a tarp that can be rigged over the opening, to provide shelter from rain, while keeping the tent fly open. It provides better ventilation, and provides a dry place to take off boots, etc. A while back I got a Walrus 'lanai' (front porch) from Campmor that fits over both my tents. Eurkea has a similar item, though I don't know how adaptable it is.

Paul

Yeah, I looked at the Zen.....actually, the Clipper is very similar in size and footprint - but the Clipper is free-standing (extra pole) which gives me an advantage since I find myself in sandy areas with my boat (Mid-Atlantic paddler).

I like your suggestion as to the awning - may prove handy sometime.

Thanks.

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