Seam sealing a tent

3:24 p.m. on October 20, 2003 (EDT)
(Guest)

I just got a tent that needs to be seam sealed according to the instructions. Unfortunately, they do not describe the process of seam - sealing itself so I have to figure it out on my own (I am a clueless newbie eheh). I also got some McNett SeamGrip with the tent.

Anyone have any tips or pointers? Do I just squeeze the seamgrip out of the tube, apply it to the seam and use the supplied brush? sounds simple enough I guess but is there anything I should be aware of?

Thanks all!

3:59 p.m. on October 20, 2003 (EDT)
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747 forum posts

Quote:

I just got a tent that needs to be seam sealed according to the instructions. Unfortunately, they do not describe the process of seam - sealing itself so I have to figure it out on my own (I am a clueless newbie eheh). I also got some McNett SeamGrip with the tent.

Anyone have any tips or pointers? Do I just squeeze the seamgrip out of the tube, apply it to the seam and use the supplied brush? sounds simple enough I guess but is there anything I should be aware of?

I am assuming that this is a nylon tent and that the McNett product is "Seam Grip"? Seam grip is very slow drying (over night) unless you get some with the bottle of catalyst, which I STRONGLY ADVISE.
Set up the tent, mix a small amount of seam grip and catalyst and carefull paint on a stripe about 1/4 to 3/8" wide over the seams. It doesn't matter how thin the coating is as long as it covers. For every process there is a "best" way - so don't make it too thick. As it starts to harden mix up a new batch and continue on. I think alcohol will thin it on the brush if you catch it soon enough - it is a good idea to have some spare brushs.
If you use the catalyst the stuff will set up quickly, if you don't you may end up with glue everywhere.
After it sets it can still stick to itself. The instructions reccommend some talcome powder. If you powder it too soon you will have horrible white seems, so wait till its completely dry. I like to hose down the tent and let it air dry before I talcom powder it, I'm not sure but I think washing it makes the glue less tacky. I could be wrong of course - wouldn't be the first time. Then powder it, and I have used plain old dust from the ground for this. The idea is not to have dirt stuck to the seams, but to make the seams so they don't stick together when you roll (or stuff) your tent.

By the way - seal all out side sams and around the floor seam.
If you do use it without catalyst let it dry for a whole 24 hours set up.
Jim S (:->)

6:23 p.m. on October 20, 2003 (EDT)
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Ventilation

Jim forgot a very important point, probably because he has sealed too many tents and breathed too many fumes -

Do the seam sealing in a very sell ventilated area! The solvent is the same stuff as model airplane glue and will rot your brain the same way. The main thing to seal is the seams on the fly and around the floor. Some tent makers recommend sealing both inside and outside the seams (i.e., both sides of the stitching). If you do that, make sure that when you are painting the seams inside the tent, you open all doors and vents, and maybe even have a fan going to shove the fumes out. Some people turn the tent inside out to do the inside seams. Doing it outdoors is a good idea. The fumes/solvent are flammable, by the way, so obviously do not have any open flames around (don't do it in your kitchen with the doors and windows closed and next to the stove pilot light, in other words).

-- Bill S

6:25 p.m. on October 20, 2003 (EDT)
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That's *well ventilated area*

Quote:

Do the seam sealing in a very sell ventilated area! ...

10:20 a.m. on October 21, 2003 (EDT)
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Thank you everyone!!

December 22, 2014
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