Snowshoeing

12:01 p.m. on January 30, 2007 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
5 forum posts

My friends and I would like to try snowshoeing for the first time at local mountain this Sunday. Since none of us have experience with snowshoeing, we would like to know if we can use light weight hiking shoes with snowshoes we plan to rent at local REI store.

Thanks
JP

12:05 p.m. on January 30, 2007 (EST)
143 reviewer rep
69 forum posts

I think you can use whatever footwear you want as long as they are water proof. I've used mountaineering boots and hiking boots with no issues.

3:15 p.m. on January 30, 2007 (EST)
MODERATOR
38 reviewer rep
1,757 forum posts

Take whatever shoe you plan to wear and try them out in the store. Newer snowshoes have a slip-in type binding while older ones use straps. I rented a pair at REI last year and they were the strap style which works best with a sturdy boot that doesn't compress when you tighten up the binding.

3:53 p.m. on January 30, 2007 (EST)
143 reviewer rep
69 forum posts

Oh yeah, Tom. That's a good point; I was using sturdy boots. I imagine thin boots would collapse or pinch and make for a painful trip. Considering this, I would recommend sturdy boots because you might end up putting a lot of torsion on them through the course of your trip, therefore requiring them to be very tight in the bindings.

4:22 p.m. on January 30, 2007 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
15 forum posts

also, make sure your feet stay dry and warm

4:34 p.m. on January 30, 2007 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
171 forum posts

The shoes need not be waterproof unless you will be in wet snow, around 25 degrees Fahrenheit and higher. My favorite footwear for snowshoes are my Steger mukluks, but they are not waterproof and so are only appropriate in colder temperatures. In warmer weather, I usually end up wearing my Sorel pac boots or my hiking boots with gaiters. Just make sure whatever you choose works with your bindings.

10:42 p.m. on January 30, 2007 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
4 forum posts

Yeah, you can use pretty much whatever you want. If you have a good pair of hiking boots, I would definitely recommend using those.

10:58 p.m. on January 30, 2007 (EST)
TRAILSPACE STAFF
588 reviewer rep
3,013 forum posts

I wanted to add that in addition to wearing comfortable boots and warm synthetic or wool socks, you should have gaiters to keep the snow out of those boots. I think trekking poles are nice to have along too.

Also, as a side note, a number of manufacturers are beginning to introduce winter-specific light hikers aimed at snowshoers and others. The models tend to be lighter weight hikers that are waterproof (not absolutely essential though, depending on the conditions where you’re doing) and with some synthetic insulation. I think we’ll be seeing a number of those on the market next winter. Of course, if you already have comfortable hiking and/or backpacking boots, those should do the job just fine.

1:40 a.m. on January 31, 2007 (EST)
MODERATOR
38 reviewer rep
1,757 forum posts

As already mentioned, Sorels make good snowshoeing boots. They are relatively cheap, waterproof, warm and fairly comfortable. They have removeable liners as well. I have a pair and combined with a gaiter, they work fine to keep your feet dry. If money is an issue, I got mine off eBay and see them there all the time.

11:53 a.m. on January 31, 2007 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
5 forum posts

Thanks everyone for your suggestions!

JP

5:32 p.m. on February 1, 2007 (EST)
TRAILSPACE STAFF
588 reviewer rep
3,013 forum posts

Be sure to come back and tell us how the snowshoeing went.

August 21, 2014
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: Ball of one foot sore under callus Newer: Tight Pit Zips
All forums: Older: Princeton Tec Quad malfunctioning Newer: Merrell Named 2007 Outdoor Footwear Brand of the Year