Inherited CampingGaz Backpack Stove - Fuel Canisters??

10:26 p.m. on May 29, 2007 (EDT)
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One of my father's prized backpacking possessions was his portable 1970's CampingGaz stove.

It uses CampingGaz C206 butane cartridges. I have spent the last two hours trying to track down information on replacement cartridges (I wasted the last two cartridges trying to figure the darn thing out~!)

I finally found a website here that sells those hard-to-find-CampingGaz-piercable-fuel cartridges. I am only posting this for fellow CampingGaz stove users as a reference....

www.wildcatcommerce.com

I am going to try and order some, hopefully they won't come back with...OUT OF STOCK!

11:48 p.m. on May 29, 2007 (EDT)
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There are some other die hard Gaz owners who have posted about these canisters. Try searching the archives for whatever they may have found out-which I don't think is much.

1:21 a.m. on May 30, 2007 (EDT)
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Seek Haz-Mat information for your community...

9:14 a.m. on May 30, 2007 (EDT)
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I don't think Wildcat actually sells gear (although they do provide various e-commerce services for companies in the outdoor industry). Do you have a direct link to the cartridges you found?

11:42 a.m. on May 30, 2007 (EDT)
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Wildcat is a business software company. I looked at their site. What the heck are you talking about?

1:22 p.m. on May 30, 2007 (EDT)
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The 206 canister is still being imported. Camping Gaz (aka Bleuet) is a division of Coleman. The 206 puncture-style canister is also produced by companies like Primus, a Slovenian company whose name I forget, and several SE Asian companies. You can buy the canisters at REI, EMS, and a number of other outdoor companies. Several of these will send them to you via UPS or FedEx (they have the facilities for the required packaging). Locally, here in the SFBay area, Redwood Trading Post carries a couple of the other companies' canisters in addition to the official Gaz 206.

The main thing to keep in mind is that the grommet that seals the stove and canister connection gets hard with age and will no longer seal after a few years. This leaking butane is obviously very inflammable (potentially explosive), so check the sealing grommet and replace it if needed.

The canister, once attached, cannot be removed until it is exhausted (unless you don't mind a very cold stream of butane flying out, potentially catching fire or exploding). To attach the canister, in an extremely well-ventilated location outdoors, first remove the burner top from the canister holder, place the canister in the holder and move the hoop-shaped retainers into place, then (with the fuel valve shut off), screw the burner into the stove (do this fairly rapidly to minimize leakage). The sharp point on the bottom of the burner will puncture the canister.

Once the canister is attached, operation is as trivially simple as any compressed gas stove - open the valve while holding a lit match next to the burner. That's it. Nothing really to "figure out". Shut off when done.

The 100 series (100, 106) is the one which is no longer available in the US. The OP is talking about the 206, the larger size puncture canister. The 270 and 470 are a push-on coupling that is similar in size to the industry standard threaded connector, but without the threads.

3:06 p.m. on May 30, 2007 (EDT)
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I still don't see the attraction of those old puncture canisters. I can't believe those old Gaz stoves are so superior that it's worth fiddling with the canisters. I know they are collector's items, but so is my first cel phone and I don't see anyone carrying one of them anymore. I had a Gaz stove that used the 270 "clip-on" canister. It seemed to work fine. I now have a Primus Micron that uses the standard Lindal valve. Way easier to put together than either of the Gaz designs. I also have one of the Coleman Xtreme stoves that Jim Shaw talked me into getting. I like it too, but the cartridges are a bit hard to find.

9:42 p.m. on May 30, 2007 (EDT)
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The first Bleuet (Gaz) I got was during my climbing tour of Europe in 1964. It cost me all of $5. Stoves nowdays cost $50 to hundreds. Hey, it was cheap. Why should I buy another stove at much higher price to replace my perfectly good Bleuet? (he mumbles as he sorts through his dozen stoves of various vintages and fuel types).

I have a bunch of museum pieces, if anyone is starting a museum.

10:37 p.m. on May 30, 2007 (EDT)
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I bought a new "Primus" for $12 and after ten years, stripped nozzel threads. I briefly used both Bleut stove and lantern. After long exclusive phase with alcohol Trangia, I've settled for modern gas, which are easiest.

3:14 p.m. on May 31, 2007 (EDT)
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"After long exclusive phase with alcohol" -

That could explain a LOT! ;=)

9:22 p.m. on May 31, 2007 (EDT)
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Good One Steve! Got me laughing.

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