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Right tent for the job?

1:07 p.m. on January 17, 2009 (EST)
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2 forum posts

I'm going winter camping in algonquin and I'm wondering if I need to buy another tent or if I can get away with my Mountain Hardwear Hammer Head 2 is enough?

4:56 p.m. on January 17, 2009 (EST)
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8 forum posts

Whats the average low at night?

9:51 p.m. on January 17, 2009 (EST)
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2 forum posts

-10C to -20C.

11:44 a.m. on January 18, 2009 (EST)
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I am assuming you live in canada, But I camp and hike mainly in the winter. Were it gets to about 30 to 0 degrees F. I have always used a three season tent and used a good sleeping bag and warm base layer, and I have been fine. But I am no professional. Hope that helped somewhat.

1:34 a.m. on January 19, 2009 (EST)
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440 forum posts

It's not just low temps that need to be considered. Four-season tents are constructed not just with a bit better thermal efficiency (of which one can get only so much from a couple layers of nylon or polyester), but even more with an eye to tolerance of snow, ice, and wind. A lightweight tent that's just fine as long as the rain can run off may not do so well with eight inches of white stuff plopped on top. Make that 12 inches and a 40 mph wind, and the ante for the hand just went up considerably.

Also, means of securing the tent to the planet need to be considered. If there's already a foot of snow on the ground, standard aluminum tent stakes are useful only for stirring the rice and beans, and so other methods will be required. The number, location, etc. of stake points, tie-downs, guys, etc. are considered in the design of good four-season tents.

Best advice I can offer is that you discuss your plans with a person or persons familiar with the likely weather in the area in which you plan to camp. I am not familiar with the area you mention, but if you're in Canada, I'd guess things like snow should be considered.

1:38 a.m. on January 19, 2009 (EST)
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440 forum posts

BTW, the Hammerhead 2 seems to me a pretty rugged three-season tent, and so perhaps a not-bad choice if large amounts of snowfall aren't to be concerned about. But please note that this comes from someone who only knows people with that tent, has never actually slept in one, and once made the mistake of trying to answer the wife's question, "Do these pants make me look fat?" I have yet to poke a sharp stick down a badger hole, but that could be coming....

4:32 p.m. on February 24, 2009 (EST)
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123 forum posts

i've slept in my hammerhead @ 10 degrees with a -25 wind chill. the tent was fine. attaching to the ground was a trick, as that there was 4" of snow already and the earth was frozen. but me inside in my -30 sleeping bag. i was great

April 16, 2014
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