$25,000 Rescue Fine

10:56 p.m. on July 17, 2009 (EDT)
22 reviewer rep
76 forum posts

What do you guys think of this?

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,533641,00.html

11:16 p.m. on July 17, 2009 (EDT)
38 reviewer rep
134 forum posts

Stupid. He was 17. Sometimes things happen. Just another day in the People's Republik of MA.

11:30 p.m. on July 17, 2009 (EDT)
344 reviewer rep
1,124 forum posts

Wow that's one heavy fine. But I think they are right, he should have stoped and gone back by trail. There have been some rescues that the people that got rescued had no expereance, and went were they should have not been. A rescue is no joking matter. And I think that it should cost the hiker (s). Being safe and smart is part of backpacking. I try not to press my limits to hard. I'm not going to get to far away from my comfort zone. There is a thrill to it but save is save, and dumb is dumb .

11:38 p.m. on July 17, 2009 (EDT)
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1,124 forum posts

Stupid. He was 17. Sometimes things happen. Just another day in the People's Republik of MA.

????

If it were a peoples republic the state would not fine to recoup cost of the rescue. Why bring up politics?.

12:45 a.m. on July 18, 2009 (EDT)
42 reviewer rep
10 forum posts

State law in Oregon permits Sheriff's Search and Rescue Units to charge up to $500.00 per person rescued, if a lawbreaker, inebriated, or habitual looser. (Not the exact statute.)

This provission is seldom used. The last case was for rescuing a man who rappelled off a 250 foot high bridge using a 150 foot rope. (Yes, I understand he had put a knot in the end of the rope.)

I wonder if the Fox News story is accurate.
--trad_guy

9:15 a.m. on July 18, 2009 (EDT)
225 reviewer rep
1,196 forum posts

Mikemorrow's quote, "I try not to press my limits too hard" reminds me of a couple of Reinhold Messner quotes from his essay "A Passion For Limits":

"The most important thing to know is that mountaineering involves risk. If we go to the mountains and forget that there is risk, we make mistakes. Mountains are dangerous!"

"But outside in the wild areas, mountaineering must be dangerous so that we can learn. Danger is a filter, which stops people from going where, perhaps, they should not go. Danger has to do with managing fear, gaining experience, and learning hard-won lessons."

"To be out there in dangerous places, and trying to come back, was everything. I learned that the great moment is not reaching the summit, the coming back is the climax."

"What is success in the mountains? To return! I tried to climb 8,000 meter peaks on 30 occasions, and I failed 12 times. Without failing, I would perhaps have become not only complacent and self important, but I also would have died."

And finally, here's one of my favorite:

"And I will never carry a telephone or have a handset with me in the wilderness. To do so would mean destroying the sense of isolation and exposure that I seek. If I can call out, I am no longer on the edge. These are my self-imposed rules. Now, getting older, I simply dream of climbing lower mountains and skiing across smaller ice caps or deserts. I try to do so with less and less support. After my political life as a nomad, I will spend half a year or more in the wilderness with only a rucksack--and nobody will know where I am going."

3:12 p.m. on July 18, 2009 (EDT)
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16 forum posts

Wow that is a bit much! how can they really expect anyone to pay that?

6:38 p.m. on July 18, 2009 (EDT)
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586 forum posts

Cheers for NH! Every year people recklessly (hard to prove) but now negligently (much easier) call for SAR. If you called for an ambulance, which only needs to drive on streets, you would expect to pay for it; how much more should you thank the people that risk their lives to rescue you after, perhaps, a difficult and dangerous search. Only a total ingrate would balk at paying.

NH does not "Fine" anyone who needs to be rescued; they only ask, in those cases where the rescue was the result of negligence, for the exact cost of the rescue, sometimes less, but never more (against the law). It is, I repeat, not a fine.

Should the 17 year-old choose not to pay the amount, he can have his driver's license revoked (reciprocity between states), if he owns businesses those licenses may also be revoked. Fair is fair - he went out in dangerous mountains in April expecting to do 17 miles. No-one does 17 miles in one day through that deep wet snow on those hills.

Our actions have consequences. Seventeen is not too young to learn that.

10:30 p.m. on July 18, 2009 (EDT)
38 reviewer rep
134 forum posts

OK, sorry about the "People's Republik" crack. Still stupid fine though. Unless you're trying to scare people out of the wilderness, and to make them put off calling for help until they're near death. Guess the fire department should charge when they put out a house fire, caused by something stupid. Or charge a fine when EMS has to respond to a teenage stupidty caused car wreck. It's a slippery slope.

11:30 a.m. on July 19, 2009 (EDT)
200 reviewer rep
649 forum posts

Wow $25,000 I guess if I get lost I better find my own way out.
I mean come on they tell you to stay put if your lost but $25,000 is quite the incentive to get out all buy yourself.

10:08 p.m. on July 19, 2009 (EDT)
TRAILSPACE STAFF
685 reviewer rep
3,103 forum posts

Now, here's an interesting story on this topic from Australia:


J
amie Neale, the backpacker who cost $100,000, signs celebrity agent deal

The British backpacker who was the subject of a costly search-and-rescue effort during his 12-day disappearance in the Australian Bush has signed up with a celebrity agent to sell his story to the highest bidder.

News of the proposed deal, 24 hours after Jamie Neale walked out of the wilderness of the Blue Mountains, has outraged people in Katoomba, the town from which he went missing.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article6715905.ece

Of course, we don't know yet if he'll use the money to pay the SAR folks. He may do the right thing yet, so I won't be too quick to judge.

10:58 p.m. on July 19, 2009 (EDT)
22 reviewer rep
76 forum posts

Mikemorrow's quote, "I try not to press my limits too hard" reminds me of a couple of Reinhold Messner quotes from his essay "A Passion For Limits":

"The most important thing to know is that mountaineering involves risk. If we go to the mountains and forget that there is risk, we make mistakes. Mountains are dangerous!"

"But outside in the wild areas, mountaineering must be dangerous so that we can learn. Danger is a filter, which stops people from going where, perhaps, they should not go. Danger has to do with managing fear, gaining experience, and learning hard-won lessons."

"To be out there in dangerous places, and trying to come back, was everything. I learned that the great moment is not reaching the summit, the coming back is the climax."

"What is success in the mountains? To return! I tried to climb 8,000 meter peaks on 30 occasions, and I failed 12 times. Without failing, I would perhaps have become not only complacent and self important, but I also would have died."

And finally, here's one of my favorite:

"And I will never carry a telephone or have a handset with me in the wilderness. To do so would mean destroying the sense of isolation and exposure that I seek. If I can call out, I am no longer on the edge. These are my self-imposed rules. Now, getting older, I simply dream of climbing lower mountains and skiing across smaller ice caps or deserts. I try to do so with less and less support. After my political life as a nomad, I will spend half a year or more in the wilderness with only a rucksack--and nobody will know where I am going."

Good stuff. Thanks.

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