Outdoor mindset

5:28 p.m. on October 9, 2009 (EDT)
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I’ve noticed that the more time that I spend in the woods (hiking or otherwise), the more my worldview tends to move away from the fast paced lifestyle of “modern” society. I enjoy things at a slower, more relaxed, pace. I’ve always wondered what type of effect getting more people to enjoy the benefits of the outdoors would have on society in general, and I’m curious what everbody else thinks …

6:36 p.m. on October 9, 2009 (EDT)
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coyotepacker,

Everyone encounters the world and adversity differently. You were slowed and thoughtful as a result of your experiences, but others will treat the wilderness as something to be conquered. The type A personality so revered in business may tend to rush through the woods, peak-bagging, trail-running, and, IMO, missing everything of value.Some will say every response is valid; perhaps, but not every response is edifying.

This is the backcountry forum, so your answers may be different than those from a trail forum. I hope that your experience may be a model for others.

7:22 p.m. on October 9, 2009 (EDT)
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I find that the more I get out in the wilderness, the more I want to be there. My wife and I are structuring our lives around getting out as often as possible, and eventually, when the kids are grown, on a more permanant basis. We find backpacking in particular makes us feel closer to one another, more relaxed and more healthy than any other activity in our lives.

8:28 p.m. on October 9, 2009 (EDT)
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Rita and I are thinking of living in a Yurt in the long run. :)

9:11 p.m. on October 9, 2009 (EDT)
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After my entire lifetime as an adult, living between working a few months of the year and going adventure hiking,biking and camping the rest, I have also discovered that now in my mid 50s I live at a very relaxed pace. I know the wilderness is always out there waiting for me to come back to its peace and nuturing.

In the immortal words of my favorite writer on wilderness:

Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature's peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop off like autumn leaves...John Muir

Or from my second favorite:

I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived....Henry David Thoreau

8:41 a.m. on October 10, 2009 (EDT)
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Rita and I are thinking of living in a Yurt in the long run. :)

If you're serious, and you have a woman willing to try, DO IT!!

 

I'd say the call of the wild is in all of us, but it shouldn't be a mystery as we've sported in the wild for about the last 200,000 years as modern humans, and the old neanderthal rush we feel when stepping outside and getting our bag nights shouldn't come as a surprise. Especially now that Fall is here and that old October "first-cold-swirling-leaves" headrush welcomes us back.

9:40 a.m. on October 10, 2009 (EDT)
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Tipi Walter said

I'd say the call of the wild is in all of us, but it shouldn't be a mystery as we've sported in the wild for about the last 200,000 years as modern humans, and the old neanderthal rush we feel when stepping outside and getting our bag nights shouldn't come as a surprise. Especially now that Fall is here and that old October "first-cold-swirling-leaves" headrush welcomes us back.

Fall and Winter are when I tend to feel the most powerful effects of being in the backcountry.

8:22 a.m. on October 11, 2009 (EDT)
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It's easy to notice the difference when you travel between eastern and western Canada. Go to a ski town in the Rockies where most of the folks are hunting, backcountry skiing and snowboarding, kayaking, fishing, climbing... the relaxed attitude and easy-going approach of the locals is a sharp contrast with the stressed-out, fast-paced mentality of the east coast cities.

Next spring school is done and my wife and I are going to settle down in BC, you get hooked on the "no-worries-it's-all-good" mentality!

6:08 a.m. on October 23, 2009 (EDT)
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I find that the more I get out in the wilderness, the more I want to be there. My wife and I are structuring our lives around getting out as often as possible, and eventually, when the kids are grown, on a more permanant basis. We find backpacking in particular makes us feel closer to one another, more relaxed and more healthy than any other activity in our lives.

I agree. The more we are out there the more we want to be there. We do get out as often as we can, almost every weekend. It makes me feel calm, relaxed and at peace. We do feel closer to one another as well; I think it is good for couples and their relationship. We want to thru-hike the AT but have to wait...... Dreaming, of course, but....I could and would live out there in the wildernes..... :-)

Gretchin

12:55 a.m. on November 13, 2009 (EST)
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It's nice to hear that I am not the only one who breathes a sigh of relief to "get outta town" and slow down! Forced to focus on the trial, stopping to breathe, enjoying watching the critters, listening to the birds, the sound of a rill dancing over rocks...yep yep yep. Why I sitting here just typing about it???.....

November 21, 2014
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