Waterbottles

5:31 p.m. on August 22, 2010 (EDT)
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Stainless steel? Nalgene plastic? Thermos? Camel Pack? Those like "bags" of water?"


I can't decide. I'm thinking Nalgene sounds good but I'm wondering if I have a blind spot.

8:28 p.m. on August 22, 2010 (EDT)
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I prefer the Camelbak hard plastic bottles. The straw sipper is nice, you don't get soaked and can sip on the go. They do start leak after a while. I have been experimenting lately with just putting on a "classic" Camelbak cap, its been working well so far. The mouth of the bottle is smaller than that of the Nalgene, and I prefer that. I hardly ever out ice in mine so the opening isn't as important for me.

8:28 p.m. on August 22, 2010 (EDT)
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Well that is a very common question with alot of differnet answers based on your needs. I typically carry a camelbak 3L bladder, and a 1L nalgene. Now I carry the nalgene because it will screw onto my MSR miniworks filter. A nalgene weighs in at 6.5oz which is fairly heavy for a watter bottle empty.

I like stainless as well because if it is single wall you can boil water in it(some people like this some don't care). There are other types of nalgenes that are lighter than the hard sided ones. A thermos...not really needed. I make a hot drink in camp and then finish it before I hit the trail. I might stop and make one at a rest stop if it's cold out.

I like using my bladder because I like the convienance of being able to easily drink on the move without having to pull out a water bottle. The downside is a bladder is a little more tedius to fill than a simple water bottle.

A added bonus for my nalgene is that it makes a great vessel for washing clothes. Stuff in a pair or two of socks or whatever, fill halfway or so with water, add in a few drops of Dr. B soap, shake up well and put it in the pack. The hiking during the day will act like a washing machine and all the bounceing will thoroughly clean your clothes. Then you just rinse.

12:03 a.m. on August 23, 2010 (EDT)
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Same here with the 3Liter Camelbak along with the single Nalgene. Its more of a necessity since I use the steriPEN adventurer when treating water by liters from the nalgene and transferring to the Camelbak. its a pain in the rear using the S-Pen in the Camelbak itself. And as for filtering, most attachments fit prefectly snug when inserted in the nalgene top.

Also, with a full bladder in my pack hydration sleeve, I can use energy drink mixes or whatever in the Nalgene when breaking or at camp.

4:02 a.m. on August 23, 2010 (EDT)
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Nalagene. It's simple, easier to clean, more durable, and can be passed around. (Something wierd about passing around a sippy tube.) Nalagene is generally cheaper too.
Ed

8:46 a.m. on August 23, 2010 (EDT)
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I carry a 3L Camelbak resevior and one or more unlined stainless bottles. I used to carry nalgenes, but switched over to Kleen Kanteens since I can heat water in them over an open flame. Just be sure the stanless bottles you buy don't have any plastic coating if you plan on boiling water in them. I also like the lids better on most stainless bottles. The plastic lid loop on my Nalgenes would always slip off if they were filled wth water.

1:02 p.m. on August 23, 2010 (EDT)
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I'm interested in switching over from Nalgean to something I can boil water in.....

http://www.kleankanteen.com/products/wide/klean-kanteen-64oz-wide.html

I think the 64oz is calling my name...


Well maybe the 32 oz...

1:02 p.m. on August 23, 2010 (EDT)
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Although could you possibly get rust in there? Just a little bit of rust would ruin everything...

3:15 p.m. on August 23, 2010 (EDT)
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I love both bladders and bottles,nalgene are my favorite.The ease of drinking on the go is what a bladder is all about.Also haveing 3 liters on hand in camp is a good thing.I carry the nalgene just incase the bladder explodes on itself as a backup,strange thing is i have never had a bladder leak.I prefer the camelbak due to its large opening but also use the platypus bladders.SAince switching to bladders i stay hydrated much more than when i was useing just bottles.ymmv

3:24 p.m. on August 23, 2010 (EDT)
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remind me to avoid the sock-water coming out of that nalgene....

the camelbak and nalgene non-bpa (tritan) bottles are both pretty solid, and about the same price for a liter bottle. the camelback top is much better suited for a clip but isn't attached to the bottle like nalgene.

note that tritan appears to react with ingredients in sun block. i have two tritan bottles that look fairly cloudy today - combination of dirt, sand and sunblock did it. i don't mind that the bottles no longer look so shiny, but it makes you wonder. my bpa-laden lexan bottles never did that.

camelbak 'bags of water' are my primary choice if it's appreciably above freezing outside. the water stays cooler because it's inside your pack, and it's much easier to hydrate and keep moving. because the bag is inside your pack, they last quite well - i have two camelbaks, both over three years old. the main downside for me is the need to occasionally clean the drinking tube with a pipe-cleaner, the tubes tend to accumulate some crud.

7:58 p.m. on August 23, 2010 (EDT)
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HydraPak 3L bladder (the opening makes it much easier to fill/empty/clean than a Camelback imo) + a sigg 1L bottle.

9:36 a.m. on August 25, 2010 (EDT)
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I have never been accused of being ultra-light, preferring to shave weight off myself rather than my gear.

However I am often accused of being cheap. Sometimes it is because of my affinity for hiking with plastic beverage/water bottles that I reuse from the store. They are extremely light, pretty much free since I am basically reusing what I already bought and when they are old or dirty I simply throw them away.

My favorite is the apple juice bottles I get for my kids. They have a wider mouth, are fairly rigid and have a flatter profile which helps them fit in my pack. Oh yes, did I mention that they are free?

A $63 Kleen canteen? No way! Thats a tank of gas for me which would get me to my next hike and back.

10:24 a.m. on August 25, 2010 (EDT)
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I have several kleen kanteens, of various capicities, and have not paid more than $15 for any of them- You just gotta keep your eyes out for sales and good deals.

1:54 p.m. on August 25, 2010 (EDT)
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...plastic beverage/water bottles that I reuse from the store. .....when they are old or dirty I simply throw them away....

I hope you recycle them and don't just "throw them away." The plastic used does not decay or "compost", but lasts for an estimated century or longer. Out here on the Left Coast, they aren't free - there is a "beverage container tax" that you can get refunded when you take them to a recycling center (take a couple bags full, since they weigh them and don't like to give you the money for singles).

5:55 p.m. on August 25, 2010 (EDT)
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I like the larger Nalgene bottles for storing water in camp, and to use while cooking. I like at least one metal water bottle. I prefer the Camelback water bladder, and for cheap water bottles I like the smaller plastic Gatorade bottles, very sturdy and the wide mouth makes them easy to refill.

2:42 a.m. on August 26, 2010 (EDT)
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I take an empty nalgene, which fits directly onto the water filter. But I use a recycled water bottle that takes a squirt lid. I put a premade rubber ring/carabiner outfit on the top, and hang it from the D ring on my back so I have instant access. I don't even have to take it off the pack to get a drink. I hate using bladders as I feel like I have to suck so hard I will drink my toenails.

I have thought about getting a stainless steel bottle, esp for winter as I can heat water directly in the bottle if necessary.

7:27 p.m. on August 26, 2010 (EDT)
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I do just throw them away. I also live on the Left Coast but up in rural Eastern Washington.

In my defence, and a weak one at that, our state doesn't have the beverage container deposit like Oregon and Cali. and the nearest place to recycle the bottles is in a different county. It takes a long time to wear out an empty gatorade or apple juice bottle though so I don't throw away many.

10:49 p.m. on August 26, 2010 (EDT)
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My routine lately, when backpacking, is to carry my 3L MSR bladder in my pack, full for a day's hiking (+ reserve for whatever I might need, up to and including a dry camp that evening)... and an empty 1.5L Nalgene for "around camp". That has worked out pretty well.

I recently bought a 48oz "Nalgene canteen" which I am going to try out as a potential replacement for the heavy 1.5L Nalgene (2 oz instead of 5 oz). We'll see how that works out. It's nice to save unnecessary weight, though sometimes it's convenient to tuck the hard Nalgene under straps on the pack to carry it full on the trail (e.g. if I know I am headed to a dry campsite)...

3:21 a.m. on August 27, 2010 (EDT)
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I do just throw them away. I also live on the Left Coast but up in rural Eastern Washington.

In my defence, and a weak one at that, our state doesn't have the beverage container deposit like Oregon and Cali. and the nearest place to recycle the bottles is in a different county. It takes a long time to wear out an empty gatorade or apple juice bottle though so I don't throw away many.

Ironic that Wa municipalities don't have a waste recycling program, considering the PCW is the birthplace of the modern ecology movement. Even remote hamlets in many other states have the means to separate garbage in to recyclable and non-recyclable waste streams. Sounds like your city council needs a prodding.

Those using disposable bottles should sterilize these containers regularly, since they were not designed for re-use, and often aspects of their design provides nook and cranny growth sites for bacteria. This is a significant enough problem most health department do not allow restaurants to reuse disposable containers.
Ed

12:11 p.m. on August 27, 2010 (EDT)
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Yes I agree that we are rather lacking in progressiveness here. I am sure that mandatory trash separation is on its way soon and my little town (7,000 souls) used to do this years ago, before I lived here. I am not sure why it was stopped.

Eastern Washington is an agriculture-based semi-arid shrub-steppe. The land and especially the people are completely different attitude-wise from the rain-soaked urban and suburban dwellers on the Western slope of the state. Its like a different state all together.

Back to the bottles: A trip through the dishwasher usually does the trick for my reused bottles. I also use them as water bottles for the kids' rabbits. As I said, once they get to krinkly, or crack I simply use another and humanely dispose of the failing ones. REI probably hates me for writing this but I truely believe that reusing beverage bottles is superior to buying them because of the reduced cost and weight.

I think that re-using things, next to never buying them in the first place, is the best thing to do. To me though, its all just a side benefit to them being cheap and light.

You could even boil water in one but I dont reccommend trying it; leaching chemicals and such.

http://www.trails.com/how_775_boil-water-plastic-bottle.html

12:15 p.m. on August 27, 2010 (EDT)
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...I recently bought a 48oz "Nalgene canteen" which I am going to try out as a potential replacement for the heavy 1.5L Nalgene (2 oz instead of 5 oz). We'll see how that works out. It's nice to save unnecessary weight, though sometimes it's convenient to tuck the hard Nalgene under straps on the pack to carry it full on the trail (e.g. if I know I am headed to a dry campsite)...

The Nalgene, Platypus, and a couple of other flexible "Kantene" containers will eventually crack along the folds, especially in really cold weather. I have had it happen to me. Worse was one of my partners on Denali who had taken one to use as a pee bottle. Well, it was easy to differentiate it from his water bottles in the tent at night. Maybe if you use it in warm weather, the plastic won't crack. Just watch the creases of the folds when you shove it in your pack. The material for the hydration bladders is different and remains flexible at low temperatures.

1:58 p.m. on August 27, 2010 (EDT)
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I like to drink gin and tonics and seltzer water with a splash of juice. This leaves me with two containers of different materials (and re-use opportunities). As far as this topic goes I re-use the 1L tonic and seltzer (PET #1) water bottles for hiking, since as SagetoSnow said:

They are extremely light, pretty much free since I am basically reusing what I already bought and when they are old or dirty I simply throw them away.

However, unlike SagetoSnow I drop these bottles in the recycling bins in town when they are absolutely done for. Often times the caps -which unfortunately my town does not recycle- need replacing before the bottles begin to puncture. This can be as simple as asking someone else to give you their bottle cap, or getting a new bottle of tonic or seltzer water for roughly $0.67. It is not advised to put boiling water in these bottles, since they are a thinner plastic; they don't flatten down when not in use; and the mouth opening is a bit small, but these bottles should not be overlooked. For hourly water re-fills and lots of abuse these bottles can be considered a true "work horse" of bottles. So what if they get banged up, dented, scratched, or dirty? The water is still clean and oh so refreshing!


P.S. Glass tastes best, but when it comes to weight and "break-ability", plastic wins hands down.

9:02 p.m. on August 27, 2010 (EDT)
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Easy, Sage...not all of us who live on the west side grew up here :) Coming from the REAL Eastern Washington (deep in the Palouse!) we had to recycle because and be creative since it was so far from any big towns...

10:31 p.m. on August 27, 2010 (EDT)
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The city I live in does not have a curbside recycling program, but we do have a recycling center you drive to that has large dumpster sized bins for various plastics, paper / cardboard, motor oil, batteries, etc.

One trip a month takes care of our household recycling needs, and it is an affordable alternative for the city (taxpayers).

I run my reused water bottles through the dishwasher also.

12:57 p.m. on August 28, 2010 (EDT)
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I have come almost full circle on water bottles, although I won't be going back to the old aluminum canteens that I used as a scout in the '70s.

When I first started backpacking seriously as an adult, I just used 2L soda bottles. They were cheap (already had them) and tough. Then I got a few nalgene bottles. Then I got a few different size camelback bladders. But the bladders are not the lightest (nor are the nalgene bottles), and they are a pain to clean. So this year I went back to reusing plastic water bottles. My wife usually has a few of them laying around (I never buy bottled water myself, and my wife usually has friends give her a bottle now and then), so I use them. They are tough enough, and much lighter than a nalgene. And if you want larger capacity, the 1L or 2L soda bottles are great options.

I don't have to worry about compatibility with filters or treatment, because I do not filter or treat my drinking water. I am always at high elevation in the sierras, and the risk of contamination there has been seriously overexaggerated.

10:49 p.m. on August 28, 2010 (EDT)
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Thanks, OGBO, that's good to know. I bought the "Cantene" as an experiment. I figured I'd add 2 oz to my pack and carry it in conjunction with my old 1.5L regular Nalgene.


But from the sounds of it I'll be ditching the new-fangled Cantene before long :(

9:21 a.m. on August 31, 2010 (EDT)
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Second gear! Its good to hear from someone from the Palouse. Much respect! I spent a lot of time (maybe too much) down on the breaks of the Snake and around Albion and Almota during college.

My dirty secret is that I grew up in King County but since becomming a Coug I am an East-sider by choice.

10:48 a.m. on October 26, 2010 (EDT)
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I'm going to drive this topic back up to the top... came looking today for this very discussion... and here it was (everytime... TS rocks).

I am on the cusp of ditching the camelbak bladder and returning to Nalgene bottles.  I know I'm not saving a lot of weight (maybe even adding some), but the switch seems to be worth a try.  Two reasons:

1) My bladder evenly eliminates space in some of my bags.  Because it is spread across my back, it cuts down on useable space all the way down.  I lose 2" or so.  With bottles, I can pack around them, or even carry them externally.

2) Water filters...  they all fit a Nalgene (or similar) opening.  None of them fit to a Camelbak omega bladder.  Using the Steripen is obnoxious with a bladder.  So, the weight I may lose on bladder-to-32ozers, I'm going to gain by going back to my Steripen and ditching the full micro-filter pump.

Just my thoughts before we head into snowshoe season...

11:04 a.m. on October 26, 2010 (EDT)
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Some interesting numbers -

Klean Kanteen - 40oz wide - Weight - 7.35oz (w/o cap)

Nalgene "Everyday" Plastic - 32oz wide - Weight 5.28oz

Nalgene Stainless - 38oz wide - Weight - 12.9oz!

Generic Disposable Plastic Bottle - 20oz - Weight - 0.4oz

Camelbak Stowaway - 100oz - Insulated - Weight - 10oz

 

Weight to capacity (where 1 would equal one oz capacity to one oz of weight):

Klean Kanteen - 5.4

Nalgene Plastic - 6.06

Nalgene Stainless - 2.94

Disposable - 50!

Camelbak Stowaway - 10

 

So, by switching back to Nalgene plastic, I'm only dropping four points of weight-to-capacity.  Not horrible, especially considering the increased functionality of the bottles. 

 

I could keep running these all day... but I better get to work.

11:48 a.m. on October 26, 2010 (EDT)
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I didn't see a ton of mention of WHAT you were using it for. I have many water bottles, but use them differently depending on my circumstances. Obviously you can't use a camelpack very well in the winter, at the very least the tube will freeze rendering it useless and then you're carrying around a block of ice. I typically use a 1 liter nalgene bottle, 2 - 1/2 liter squirt bottles that go in either bottle pocket of my pack, and I have a bottle with a 1 micron filter approved by the EPA and used in Haiti during crisis relief. The filter is attached to the straw, so if I was ever in dire straights and needed to just dip into a stream and go, the water gets filtered as I suck it through the straw.

On winter day hikes, I bring a thermos full of boiling hot coco.

12:29 p.m. on October 26, 2010 (EDT)
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Obviously you can't use a camelpack very well in the winter, at the very least the tube will freeze rendering it useless and then you're carrying around a block of ice.

Not entirely true.  My snowshoeing backpack (Gregory Drift) has an insulated sleeve for the camelbak tubing built into the shoulder strap.  Combined with the neoprene sleeve that you can get for a camelback hose, I have never had a frozen hose.  Quite a few winter sports packs are going that route.

1:57 p.m. on October 26, 2010 (EDT)
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I bought one of these in the spring.

 

http://www.gsioutdoors.com/products/pdp/1_l_glacier_stainless_dukjug/bottles_jugs/

 

and I totally love it. Going to buy a couple more soon. (Me, the wife, the kid, the dog...) I use a bladder also, but really prefer bottles.

I'm not fond of the chemicals in plastics (I know... they took the BPA out. Only after enough people made a fuss about it. There are other chemicals nobody is talking about in the main stream yet and Stainless is it for me.) Finally, my water, hot/cold or otherwise, tastes like water. The design is great, the wide mouth/threads match the standard for filters and it's rock solid. Near daily use for over six months now and I just like it more. And it's half the price of the Kleen Kanteen.

4:15 p.m. on October 26, 2010 (EDT)
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...Obviously you can't use a camelpack very well in the winter, at the very least the tube will freeze rendering it useless and then you're carrying around a block of ice....

As Cleric noted, this is not correct. A Nalgene will also freeze in winter, with the stainless freezing faster, since the metal conducts the heat out of the water faster. In all cases, there are techniques for keeping your water (or hydration mix) fluid in winter. I have used my Camelbak in temperatures of -40 to -50 without having it freeze, simply by using the right technique.

It isn't really enough to keep your drinks from freezing. If you are drinking cold fluids in cold weather, you lose some of your body heat to heating that cold water up to body temperature (one of the major reasons for not eating snow as well).

The little bit of foam around the hose is not enough to keep the hose from freezing in really cold temperatures, nor is the little bit of foam in the packs. You have to take other steps.

As a hint (without giving the technique completely away), a couple years ago, Camelbak introduced the ShredBak, a softshell vest that has a mesh liner to hold the bladder inside close to your back. The hose end and bite valve is stored in a small pocket on the vest where you can retrieve it to take a drink. They have also introduced a mesh vest to be worn under your jacket. The bladder used with the ShredBak has an inner baffle to keep the thickness down, so that it is comfortably worn under your pack.

Alicia mentioned the ShredBak and gave an early review on Trailspace a couple years back, and I gave a slightly more extensive evaluation a couple months later after having used one during winter ski tours.

Now, why use a hydration bladder in the first place? The primary reason is that you tend to keep continuously hydrated by taking frequent small sips while moving, rather than larger gulps when you have to stop to retrieve the bottle from inside your pack.

One way to keep the water bottle more handy and slow the freezing (yes, I said "slow the freezing", not "prevent") is to use one of the OR cozies. The cozies do provide some slowing - in a series of tests I did some years back on insulated containers, I found that starting with boiling water (yeah, I know, it speeds the release of BPA in the old Nalgenes) and keeping the containers in a 0 deg F environment, the Nalgene in cozy (1 liter) will drop to 100F in 4 hours. Several Thermos-style bottles extended that to 5 hours (that included a couple of famous name brands). The best containers were the 2 Nissan thermoses (0.5 liter and 1.0 liter) which kept the water above 100F for 24 hours (0.5 liter) and 27 hours (1.0 liter). The chart below shows the cooling of the 1 liter, 0.5 liter, and Nalgene in cozy bottles, with the 32F freeze line indicated:

INSUBOT1.jpg

4:59 p.m. on October 26, 2010 (EDT)
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interesting bill i haven't heard of liners or vests that hold the camelback against your body, but I guess I haven't really explored it either. I've done a fair amount of research on Himalayan expeditions and I haven't heard camelbacks mentioned at all. Is that something used frequently in that environment? Also it seems sort of counter-productive to wear water close to your body when water is a very poor heat retainer. In cold environments, you'd be expending a fair amount of your body heat to keep the water from freezing, rather than retaining it within your layering system.

 

Also I guess it depends on the type of stainless steel being used. I have a stainless thermos that has kept coco hot enough to burn my skin after 8+ hours in 10F weather.

9:26 p.m. on October 26, 2010 (EDT)
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Actually, water has one of the highest specific heats of any common substance. Once warm (putting hot water in your water bottle or Camelbak), it will cool more slowly than almost anything else with the same insulation. That's one reason people put a water bottle full of hot water in their sleeping bags on backcountry ski trips or on Arctic or Antarctic expeditions. Typically, you are generating a lot of body heat when doing activities where you would wear the bladder inside your jacket. Many expedition-level hard shells and down parkas have a water bottle pocket inside them.

I intentionally left out a number of the details, among them that you start with warm water in your Camelbak (not boiling hot, since that could burn your skin). My main reason for not describing the techniques involved is that you have to follow the procedures religiously - I don't want anyone coming back at me and claiming that it doesn't work, then arguing that they did exactly what I told them when actually they didn't. So I will leave it at "it is possible to use a CamelBak-type hydration bladder at temperatures of -40F/C and below, IF you follow the correct procedures". (actually, if you dig around on Trailspace, you can find a description of how to do it).

Generally, that method is not used on Himalayan expeditions for the simple reason that the vast majority of clients have no idea how to keep their water liquid and have to be required to bring a thermos (the Nissan 1 liter is frequently specified). Seems to me I just saw a certain Trailspace poster making note of people setting out on winter hikes in the Presidentials not taking the most basic steps. When the majority of people hire onto an expedition to "conquer Everest", they actually have little experience at all with climbing. They have to have their hands held all the way. And under the stress of that sort of climb, the guide services want to minimize the possibility of problems.

What brand and model is your thermos? Are both the inner and outer shells stainless, or is the inner a glass bottle? Not all stainless thermoses are the same. One I tested (not on the chart) performed worse than the Nalgene with cozy. That one was too hot to touch the outside after pouring the boiling water into it, so obviously the inner bottle was poorly isolated from the outer shell. Another was ok for an 8-hour day of 0F weather (lukewarm at the 8-hour point). You have to take a close look at the inner construction - is there a thermal barrier between the inner and outer shells, or as in too many "insulated" bottles, are the inner and outer steel shells welded together at the mouth of the container? The Nissans have a thick, low conductivity separator between the inner and outer steel containers.

11:09 p.m. on October 26, 2010 (EDT)
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Great post Bill... incredible bit of info (as always).

I should also add that my usage during winter rarely dumps below -20*.  I have little cause to be out on those temps and plan accordingly.  So, my lack-o-freezing-camelbak is within those parameters. 

11:21 p.m. on October 26, 2010 (EDT)
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"When the majority of people hire onto an expedition to "conquer Everest", they actually have little experience at all with climbing. They have to have their hands held all the way."

 

scary....

 

 

not sure the brand of the thermos...I got it at EMS, I believe it claims to have some kind of vacuum in it.

 

I love the nalgene full of boiling water in the sleeping bag trick. Did that myself last weekend and it feels great - along with also having a sleeping bag full of fuel, boots, extra clothes, and drying socks haha.

1:38 a.m. on October 30, 2010 (EDT)
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Excellent post BillS

 

I use the Kleen Kanteen - 40oz wide - Weight - 7.35oz (w/o cap) 

The reason I use this, well they looked really cool one night after a few pints at Gritty's during a shopping spree in Freeport.  One aspect that attracted me was that you can boil water in the canteen if necessary, and the stainless lends itself to being easy to clean in the field (sometimes I like to hydrate dried beans and or rice on the trail).

4:09 p.m. on November 7, 2010 (EST)
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Mainly, I use a 3L Osprey bladder and a 1.5L Nalgene to replenish it. I freak out about dehydration so I always carry extra water. When I was working in the field it was not uncommon for me to roll through over 6 liters of water so I would supplement this set up with a 2 quart canteen.

If I am going on a short day hike and/or know I will be close to a water source, I have a 2L Camelbak with a 1L smartwater bottle stuffed into the pack. My Camelbak Rogue pack is very small so I found the thin smartwater bottle works great.

 

11:29 p.m. on November 7, 2010 (EST)
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100 Oz. Camelbak Unbottle is always my first choice. I've had it function perfectly down into the teens (neoprene wrap on hose) and chilled with ice to last for hours in the low 100's, and it has never failed me. I typically carry one (sometimes 2) Cyclone BPA free 1L bottles with Guyot Designs Gription lids w/ handles (If I'm not concerned about overall pack weight-they're heavy). The Griptions make life easy and I've never had a leak.

The 1L bottles allow me to use my Steripen and then pour into the unbottle.

11:03 p.m. on November 22, 2010 (EST)
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just read a recent review of the shredbak from someone who tested it in the winter for hours of cold weather activities, and it looks like my initial thoughts on it were correct. The water acting as a heat conductor actually pulled heat away from his core.

 

From his review:

 

"All that said, my initial test of the ShredBak was not a positive experience. On a recent ski day, I wore the ShredBak over a thin wool base layer (and under an eVent shell jacket). It was about 20 degrees and overcast. The hydration reservoir, sitting in the mesh vest against my upper back, quickly made me cold via conductive cooling. The container of cool water on my back was draining my core heat. I used the company’s provided thermal pad between the water reservoir and my body, but to no avail.

On the third chairlift ride, shivering, I began draining all of the water from the hose, spraying a stream from the bite valve into the air until it was gone.

I tried the system with warm water, and it was indeed cozy. However, after a couple hours the container of water got cold again, and then I was back to where I’d began with squirting water from the chairlift."

 

While I'm sure we could get into discussions about specific heat and retention, it would seem from actual experience, the shredbak does little to help the hiker retain heat, and actually sucks it from the body as the water temp drops, which was my initial concern upon hearing about this bladder.

 

The inner pockets of jackets which can hold water bottles are generally made for one reason - to prevent the freezing of water. The purpose of those pockets is not to provide the hiker/climber with a reliable heat source, because once the temperature of the water drops, as I said before, it sucks the heat from your body.

 

It's like getting into a hot bath in a room that is freezing cold. Even if the water has a high specific heat and stays warm for a while, once it cools, your body becomes the heat source. The water then sucks the heat from your body in a simple display of equilibrium.

 

9:21 a.m. on November 23, 2010 (EST)
TRAILSPACE STAFF
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iClimb, I've got a Shredbak review here too, in case you haven't seen it: http://www.trailspace.com/articles/2009/07/06/review-camelbak-shredbak.html

For some reason I never put it on the actual product page, but I'll add it: http://www.trailspace.com/gear/camelbak/shredbak/

4:11 p.m. on November 23, 2010 (EST)
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582 forum posts

thanks for the link Alicia.

 

I guess I had a fair amount of info on the Shredbak from other reviews too...I mainly posted the other review because I am competitive and was glad to see I was right about the temperature loss even though I was told I was wrong hahaha

 

It's a guilty pleasure I guess.

2:25 a.m. on December 1, 2010 (EST)
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I generally use a combination of free bottles for mine. Planning on carrying 6-8 L in the desert portions of the PCT this Spring, w/ two 2L plastic soda bottles, and two 1L soda bottles. They collapse down well, are light, leakproof, and free. Easily replaceable in any twon spot. I also have two modified cuben fiber slings/holders for the 2L on my pack. Works out well! :)

Dug

http://thf2.wordpress.com

12:35 p.m. on December 2, 2010 (EST)
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235 forum posts

Personal habits play a large role in selecting your hydration process also. I use a 3L cammelback and a 1L nalgene to even things out. Refilling the bladder is a pain and if anything goes wrong you could be in a crunch.

However, I usually go with groups with lotsa newbies and I am the fix it guy and help make adjustments. When the group stops, I don't get time to hydrate as I should and have paid for it. The bladder lets me hydrate as I go (even in 100F + weather).

11:24 p.m. on December 7, 2010 (EST)
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184 forum posts

It was a few months ago, but I found a couple of Lifeline green 18/8 stainless steel bottles (27oz) at Big Five Sporting goods here in Denver for twenty dollars.  I have bought the Kleen Kateen but they are so expensive.

11:45 p.m. on December 7, 2010 (EST)
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4,069 forum posts

I like my 3 litre camelbak because it comes in handy for other purposes. Other than holding water to drink, it can be used as a fire extinguisher when putting out the campfire ashes in the morning. I also use it for a pillow when blown up with air thru the mouth piece.  And it can also be used like a solar shower if hung upside down and allowed to warm in the sun and then just pinch the bite valve. And like the extinguisher idea, I saw a couple kids use them one summer like ultra-squirt guns dousing each other.

7:35 a.m. on December 8, 2010 (EST)
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I carry a 3L Osprey bladder that fits both my backpacks and my day pack.  I'll carry a 1L Nalgene to attach to my purifier when backpacking.

July 23, 2014
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