Critters seen on a dayhike

12:42 a.m. on September 7, 2010 (EDT)
TOP 10 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
2,329 reviewer rep
5,295 forum posts

Barb and I went for a bit of a dayhike up one of our usual hills (6.3 miles, 2400 ft elevation gain and descent). The usual crowd of critters were there. This one was part of a gang of about 20 to 25.

I would like to have this guy move into our garden. He and his kind are very friendly for us organic gardeners.

Another view of the Guardian of Vegetation from insect herbivores.

10:10 a.m. on September 7, 2010 (EDT)
200 reviewer rep
4,151 forum posts

Interesting a brown Praying Mantis, all the ones I have ever saw were green. Where did you see him?

10:24 a.m. on September 7, 2010 (EDT)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
658 reviewer rep
2,148 forum posts

I have a beautiful lichen-grey coloured Carolina Mantis in my yard right now. The mantis is one of my favorite insects.

1:28 p.m. on September 7, 2010 (EDT)
TOP 10 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
2,329 reviewer rep
5,295 forum posts

Gary,

Unless you have your monitor calibrated, you are unlikely to see the "true" colors of the image. "True" in this case means the colors that the photographer/editor saw on their calibrated monitor (assuming they have one). I use a Spider 3 for calibration.

Second, the colors seen in a color print, color slide, or electronic image aren't natural colors anyway. The colors in electronic images depend on what "color space" you are working in and the "color space" of the camera. My digital cameras allow 2 different color spaces, plus RAW. I normally use the Adobe version. There are a couple of software packages to use with PhotoShop that provide color spaces that match a number of the "classic" color films that many professional photographers prefer.

Third, mantises and many other critters tend to adopt the color of their surroundings. The California Academy of Sciences had an interesting exhibit on this. Right now, Bay Area hillsides have brown or "golden" grasses, so you would expect the mantis' color to be a close match.

Plus, the color of anything shifts with the color of the light source. Which is why most people prefer photos taken during the "magic hours" of the day.

11:43 p.m. on September 7, 2010 (EDT)
REVIEW CORPS
1,245 reviewer rep
1,270 forum posts

Cool, OGBO, what lens did you use for these? And are these with the D300s?

12:20 a.m. on September 8, 2010 (EDT)
TOP 10 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
2,329 reviewer rep
5,295 forum posts

This was the D40x and Tamron 28-300 VC lens - I was traveling light.

At the OR Show, I saw a Pentax "credit card" camera that the Pentax guy claimed was waterproof to 30 ft, shockproof to a 4 foot drop onto concrete, and would work down to 14F. That sounds good for a winter backcountry ski tour or rock climbing. I would like to see the quality of the images, though. Still, it is the photographer, not the gear, just like any other art or craft - Ansel Adams would have produced great images with a Diana, and a number of excellent photographers have. (The Diana is a plastic toy camera that uses film.)

7:46 a.m. on September 8, 2010 (EDT)
110 reviewer rep
762 forum posts

..I saw a Pentax "credit card" camera that the Pentax guy claimed was waterproof to 30 ft, shockproof to a 4 foot drop onto concrete, and would work down to 14F.

Give the credit card style cameras a try. They do have a place in your pack or camera bag. My wife got me this one a couple of years ago, and I love it. After a short retraining period, I can now take some pretty nice pics w/ it. After an unintentional 1/4 mile river swim, I can attest that this camera is indeed waterproof. Shock resistant? I have dropped it on the ground a time or two as well. I really like that I can pack it or pocket it, and it doesn't take up that much room.

Additionally, this camera has a selectable tap feature that allows certain controls to be used with heavy-gloved hands. Great for winter travel!

Click on the pic for more info.

9:06 a.m. on September 8, 2010 (EDT)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
658 reviewer rep
2,148 forum posts

There are many pro photogs that use and love holga lenses that are modded to fit their DSLRs. The optical inconsistency of the plastic lenses adds a certain interest and spice to their bag of tools.

(The Holga was/is another cheap plastic lens camera)

9:18 p.m. on September 8, 2010 (EDT)
14 reviewer rep
318 forum posts


I thought you saw critters. Scary little suckers aren't they.

1:42 a.m. on September 13, 2010 (EDT)
REVIEW CORPS
1,245 reviewer rep
1,270 forum posts

Still, it is the photographer, not the gear, just like any other art or craft - Ansel Adams would have produced great images with a Diana, and a number of excellent photographers have. (The Diana is a plastic toy camera that uses film.)

Yeah, I see that all the time in the photography forums... the forums where people discuss all their expensive new cameras, lenses, and other gear :).

7:16 p.m. on September 20, 2010 (EDT)
284 reviewer rep
141 forum posts

This was early in the morning and it didn't moved, I had no effect of me being in his area. I was told they can live for 20 years (Females) and males live for 10 years or after they mate the male will be dead in 1 year.

1:19 a.m. on September 21, 2010 (EDT)
200 reviewer rep
4,151 forum posts

Dead a year after mating? ow, spider guys have all the luck! So the females get everything including thier mates life in the divorce...

September 16, 2014
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: Ho-made stove Newer: Who Needs Bear Spray?
All forums: Older: 2 Ensolite pads for sale Newer: Now what? After the big climb/hike/adventure