Best defense against the mosquitos?

4:05 a.m. on September 26, 2011 (EDT)
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On a recent trip to the Mammoth Lakes, CA. area we all got eaten alive by the mosquitos... we used Off! and Sawyer Jungle Juice, neither worked. We got to the point where we told the mosquitos, Go ahead and nibble on us. We'll just use After Bite later'... :(

I know the mosquitos have preference for the victims they choose (sugar intake?) so far nothing's seemed to work (clothing and sprays, though I haven't tried ALL the sprays) :(

I've read about vitamins and some natural repellents that work...  is finding the right defense against the annoying mosquitos something that works on an individual basis (perhaps because of the way our body chemicals absorb the repellent)? Is there truly an anti mosquito repellent out there?

Would like to be able to enjoy the outdoors without having to slap ourselves every 5 seconds or having to stay in the tent all day...

8:26 a.m. on September 26, 2011 (EDT)
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DET based products work ok with me, but I also use a head net when they are thick.  Search the archive, there are sure to be many threads on this very subject.

Ed

9:06 a.m. on September 26, 2011 (EDT)
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Don't know about your area, but garlic w/ parsley tablets really make a big difference in the Louisiana/Arkansas area.  It not 100% effective, but it does make a difference.  The parsley keeps the garlic from causing indigestive problems and helps with the taste.  The mosquitoes come in for the landing or just hoover around then leave.  They seldom bite.  The tabs seem to help for about 3-4 hrs.  Doesn't work on flys.  They think its a spice;)

http://www.iherb.com/Source-Naturals-Garlic-Parsley-250-Softgels/1197?at=0

Here's a source if you want to try it.

9:32 a.m. on September 26, 2011 (EDT)
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DEET is it.  Long sleeves, pants and a headnet.  Headnets for kids make trips more fun.  All the other stuff is anecdotal evidence only.  Science says DEET.

10:43 a.m. on September 26, 2011 (EDT)
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In NZ at least it's DIMP (dimethylpthalate) instead of DEET. When I worked for a national park down there, they would just give a brown 1 liter bottle half full of the stuff. I used to keep a rag soaked with it in an old PB jar so I could rub myself down and work bareback if/when the weather was nice. It's oilier then DEET, but equally effective. I really don't like putting any of that stuff on, but will if the mozzies or black flies (sand flies in NZ) get real bad. For kids you might want to try to use something with 20% or less DEET, just to keep from overdosing.

3:06 p.m. on September 26, 2011 (EDT)
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I had "100%" DEET melt a watchband and kill some goretex. 

It has caused two adult and three child deaths by dermal exposure.  In the big scheme, its less dangerous than lightning, honeybees and mosquitoes but do be careful. 

Its still the most effective thing there is.

6:55 p.m. on September 26, 2011 (EDT)
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If you are moving around not much in the way of repellents is going to be effective. The "scent" has to reach a certain concentration in the air around you before it is effective.  I have found the OFF clip-on's work if you are relatively still and it has a chance to "fumigate" the air around you.  The OFF PowerPad lamps are good at reducing mosquitoes in an area.

I have used a combination of citronella torches (I don't know if these work or not but they create an excellent atmosphere) and PowerPad lamps (I had some that came with poles to hang them on) to surround a campsite along with a mild DEET spray in a heavily infested area (next to a river with swampy areas in Florida during the summer) and only got bitten once or twice.

 

7:03 p.m. on September 26, 2011 (EDT)
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ooohfishy,

Here is a previous thread we had going not so long ago in regards to this matter. Breeze through it and take a look. Some of the info may very well be useful to you. Happy hiking.

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/gear-selection/topics/90392.html

9:16 a.m. on September 27, 2011 (EDT)
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FromSagetoSnow said:

I had "100%" DEET melt a watchband and kill some goretex. 

It has caused two adult and three child deaths by dermal exposure.  In the big scheme, its less dangerous than lightning, honeybees and mosquitoes but do be careful. 

Its still the most effective thing there is.

I work with Agricultural chemicals everyday.  You never know how one person's body will react to a chemical.  With any insecticide, a person should try a little on the underside of your wrist.  A LITTLE!  Like a drop! This area tends to be sensitive and should show some results quickly.  Look for rashes or itching.  If you get it, don't use it!  Then go talk to your doctor.  It doesn't hurt to try the test spot even if you have been tolerant.  I developed allergies after years of exposure without symptoms.  Some quite severe.  Allergies generally develop from continued exposure.  Remember, you are just a larger more tolerant version of the target.

12:47 p.m. on September 27, 2011 (EDT)
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here in Florida - forget about it

 

the only defense is to go camping during the drier winter months and even then, you best have a hammock with mosquitto netting.

 

If the mosquitto's don't get you, the no-seeums will.

 

Always something down here wanting to eat you :)

2:14 p.m. on September 27, 2011 (EDT)
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The west has had a particularly wet year and I'm guessing you were there during a hatch. I spend a lot of time canoeing Canada's North, as well local trips in the PNW for the last 50 years. I have tried many alternatives to DEET containing products. What I can tell you is that the natural products do work to a limited extent. They are better for you than any product containing DEET. However, many of the natural products tell you to reapply frequently, such as every hour or as needed. Products containing DEET do work for repelling mosquitos. DEET also is not good for you. Any product that melts synthetic fabrics can't be good to put on your skin. If the bugs are really bad, use a DEET product, or a better alternative, a bug shirt. This is what we use up north where the bugs can be biblical. Have you ever seen what you thought was a dust devil and it turned out to be a swarm of black flies? Or heard what you THOUGHT was rain on your tent? The bottom line is unless they are really bad, I don't bother with anything.

8:56 a.m. on September 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Ohfishy said:

..Would like to be able to enjoy the outdoors without having to slap ourselves every 5 seconds...

My life's story; I just eventualy go used to getting slapped all the time:)

Erich said:

..Any product that melts synthetic fabrics can't be good to put on your skin...

 Especially if you have a naugahyde...

Ed

10:56 a.m. on September 28, 2011 (EDT)
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If you don't have any problem with the extra weight, (about .8 of a pound) the thermocell  really does work well in this part of the country.  It uses a propane cylinder to activate a scent pad.  I have set out on the back porch during heavy mosquito activity and not get a bite.  Nothing to put on your skin.  The hunters in our area do not go out on their stands without it.  It doesn't work in windy conditions nor while you are moving, unless you're really sloooow.

http://www.amazon.com/ThermaCELL-MR-G-Cordless-Repellent-Appliance/dp/B0031ESIVK/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1317221120&sr=1-2

For information on the unit:

http://www.thermacell.com/mosquito-repellent/appliances/mosquito-repellent-appliance-earth-scent

11:05 a.m. on September 28, 2011 (EDT)
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I've lived in Alaska twice and have plenty of time logged in the woods and on the water there.  Permethrin treated clothes is the only sure-fire way to keep the mosquitos away. With your outer layers treated with permethrin, you can focus on the exposed areas like hands, neck, and face.  As some have said, DEET is not a good thing to put on your skin.  It is effective, though, when used on small areas like hands and such.  I've used natural repelent in Honduras and it was just fine.  In Alaska, DEET is pretty much the only way to go with exposed skin.  The other options are to NOT have exposed skin.  I've seen more than one person treat light-weight gloves with Permethrin.  Nets over the hat and face are another option but I personally don't like them.  I'd rather use DEET or a Permethrin treated wrap like a shemagh.

4:56 p.m. on October 1, 2011 (EDT)
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As said above, permethrin treated outer clothing and DEET and at times a mosquito/fly net that goes over a brim hat for day traveling is about all you need.

If you stay away from water and wet areas and camp or eat lunch on exposed ridges that tend to have a breeze, you may not need a lot of chemical protection.  A tent is a good thing to have in high density and hungry insect areas.

At camp I wear a hooded outer jacket and long heavy socks for the ankles.  They are attracted to the CO2 generated from respiration.  It gives a good indication that there is warm blood near by.  DEET (sparingly - doesn't take much) messes up their CO2 sensing and a wind of 3 mph+ will keep them away from you since they are not strong enough to navigate to land on you in a breeze.

They are most active when you are not - early morning and late evening.  We usually leave early dashing to get packed before being consumed, then eat a breakfast along the trail where there are fewer insects.  The evening meal is usually a bit of a torment for those who use anecdotal chemicals or can't get behind an insect net in a tent.

6:15 a.m. on October 2, 2011 (EDT)
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Exofixio's bug off line usea permethrine coated clothes. Supposed to be pretty good especially when used with moderate amount of deet.

12:15 p.m. on October 2, 2011 (EDT)
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I've got one of their shirts. Seems to work fairly well. They don't seem to bite through it.

1:57 p.m. on October 2, 2011 (EDT)
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Ah yes, mosquitoes! The Sierra and Presidentials ones are the most annoying in swarms. Alaskan mosquitoes were crossbred with B-29s during WWII, so suck out a pint of blood at a time (the Alaska state bird is the mosquito - you can get a T-shirt there that has a huge mosquito with a drop of blood dripping from its needle-like snout and the phrase "I gave!"). In some areas (Africa, much of South America, etc), the mosquitoes carry such diseases as malaria, yellow fever, equine encephalitis, and other, much worse infections.

What I have found over the years is that the only really effective things are (and they have to be in combination):

1. diet - avoid soft fruits like peaches, pears, apricots, and most of all, bananas. Both fresh and dried varieties. When not sucking blood, mosquitoes feed on soft fruits. The esters get into your system and come out through the skin (the human nose can't detect these fruity smells, especially after a week of sweaty backpacking, but the bugs can). Add lots of garlicky and oniony foods. This seems to provide some repellent action. Some people are just naturally "sweet" and attract mosquitoes more than others.

2. Avoid scented soaps and lotions.

3. use time-release DEET. This seems to have less toxic side effect than using high concentrations of DEET. Personally, the 100% DEET seems to just keep the critters hovering about a foot away for a half hour, then they work their way closer and closer, and landing by 45 min. The two time-release DEET products I have been using say they last of 8-10 hours, but seem to work for about 6 hours for me in the Sierra and Alaska.The 3M product seems to work better for me than the Sawyers.

4. Permethrin-impregnated clothing - Several companies make these. I have found Ex Officio's Buzz-off to work well (see photo below, taken in Tanzania - both Barb and I have Ex Officio shirts and Tilley hats on in the photo - permethrin doesn't keep the crocodiles or hippos away!). Tilley and Sea to Summit also have hats and sleeping bag liners with permethrin. You can impregnate your clothing yourself (the bottles are available at REI and EMS), but the do-it-yourself doesn't last as long as the ready-made clothing. You do have to use the time-release DEET on your exposed skin (hands, neck, keep it away from your eyes!!!!!!!!!), even with permethrin clothing. DO NOT WEAR SHORTS in mosquito country. That's just way too much skin exposed to slather on the DEET.


b2-280.jpg

5. Netting - you can get full body suits and hat nets from many companies. Sea to Summit impregnates theirs with permethrin, which seems effective. I have found that the untreated netting just lets the bugs land on the netting, which is, shall we say, ANNOYING!!!. Since one of the attractants for mosquitoes is carbon dioxide (which everyone breathes out), they seem to cluster on the head net right in front of your nose and hence eyes. At night, it is a good idea to sleep in a tent with the netting fully closed, or to use a net tent (even in the hotel room - in some countries, even the cheap hostels provide the netting over the bed, but take it just in case they don't). A real pain is getting into the tent and finding you also invited in a gazillion mosquitoes. Learn the technique for getting in and out of the screening without letting all the bugs into the tent. One of the hazards is that mosquitoes carrying the more dread tropical diseases are in warm climates where you tend to sleep hanging half out of your sleeping bag - which presents very attractive landing spots for the suckers.

My personal experience with Jungle Juice, the popular New England pine tar concoction, and the "natural" repellents is that they just don't work for me for longer than 2 or 3 minutes at best. They might work for you, But I am apparently a mosquito's dream destination. So far, I have gotten none of the dread diseases, despite having spent time in Africa and South America, plus living in Central America and spent time living in the Deep South through several serious outbreaks of equine encephalitis (malaria and yellow fever still occur in the Deep South). I am current on my yellow fever vaccine and for Africa we did take our daily anti-malarial (vile stuff! but we didn't get the disease).

5:59 p.m. on October 2, 2011 (EDT)
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While hiking and bike tourig in Alaska in 2006 and back in the summers of 1978-79 I used garlic. I just added it to almost very meal (doesn't go well with oatmeal or cereal )  I have wondered if I could boil some in water and use the reduced water/oil mixture on my skin?

7:47 p.m. on October 2, 2011 (EDT)
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It looks like I will be going on a trip to Thailand in the comming months.  This will be a major concern, until I make the correct informed decisions,  and I will be basing alot of my clothing and gear choices in respect that fact.  I will employ three different tactics, Barriers, repellants, along with what I might eat do make me taste nasty.  I have informed my travel mates that I will have my own shelter (bivey or tent) and they need to have their own.  As I love garlic with a passion I will be consuming vast amounts on my trip.  Hot peppers and currys may work as well, which is great as I will be in one of the the centers of spicy food land.  If you have any more suggestions that have not been listed in this thread Let them rip (no pun inteded)

One of the inovations used now is pyrethroid insecticides  as Bill S related above . Not toxic to humans or large mammal's do to how it works in the our systems.  Google it if you wish to read about it.  I will most likely buy my treated mosquito netting when I get there.   I'm looking at buying a two-three season tent that is all net with a fly.  If I buy one over here then I will treat the tent with pyrethroid insecticides.  Any thoughts on the subject would be mostly appreciated.

3:11 a.m. on October 3, 2011 (EDT)
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oooo yes thank you for the tips/advice all!!!!

2:09 p.m. on October 3, 2011 (EDT)
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Mosquitos also appear to have some color preference. However, this depends on the genera. Aedes and Ochlerotatus like dark colors(black, navy, and especially red). Anopheles seem to prefer lighter colors. From my experience and research, garlic and Vitamin B seem to have no difference, except as garlic may inhibit eating the fruits that mosquitos are attracted to. The females will often feed on flower nectar to increase energy. Hence their attraction to sweet scented things.

FYI, my personal experience has been limited to genera in the PNW and further north, Alaska, NWT and Yukon.

11:07 p.m. on October 3, 2011 (EDT)
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In the Barrens, the black flies and mosquitos require the use of bug suits and bug tents.
IMG_4539.jpg

1:04 p.m. on October 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Body chemistry has something to do with mosquito attraction. They never seemed to bother my mom, but no idea why.  I used DEET in NZ, but it might also have been Dimp as Big Red says. It was a long time ago, so my bet is on DEET. I remember the warnings.  It works well, but use sparingly.  It has adverse reactions, as already mentioned and will eat synthetics like Goretex.

Supposedly, Skin So Soft, an Avon product works, but that is more anecdotal than anything. But worth a try. The worst that will happen is that you have soft skin. :)

 

10:17 p.m. on October 4, 2011 (EDT)
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1. Clothes that are not skin-tight covering your skin from neck to wrist to ankle.

2. Soak those clothes (including bandana and socks) with Permethrin.  Permethrin apparently doesn't repel, but kills; ticks and chiggers, too.  Seems like a bonus.

3. Then, 30% Deet on exposed skin.

But then, I have never had to test my cocktail agains the clouding as seen in Erich's photo.

About Avon Skin So Soft:  we used to use that in the Marine Corps in the late '80s/early '90s.  Still got bit, but assumed (incorrectly) that I'da been more bit without it.  I will never forget the smell mixed with my own been-in-the-field-for-two-weeks funk.  

More recently, Avon has produced a variety that is called Skin So Soft Bug Guard which contains Picaridin.  Anybody have luck with that?  Supposedly doesn't melt your gear.

Then there's waiting for this stuff: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21555561

12:15 p.m. on October 5, 2011 (EDT)
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I have never had any luck with Skin So Soft, nor Vitamin B. Permethrin does work. However, as I am often in the bush for weeks, I am cautious about such products. I do use concentrated DEET on hands when the bugs are really bad. Fully netted bug shirts and pants are hot and mosquitos can bite through places where the netting is against the skin. Go for bug clothing that is loose and is made from a tightly woven fabric. Elastic around the wrists and ankles.

12:26 a.m. on October 10, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/gear-selection/topics/90392.html

 

As some of you may (?) recall ... I was the author of that post-topic.

Since that time, I have been "on a mission from God"  (to quote Dan Akroyd, in "The Blues Brothers") to get to the bottom of insect (not just mosquitoes) repellency.

I have several shirts from Ex-Officio and some from LL Bean -- the "Buzz-Off" branded fabrics.

I have a "Sea-To-Summit" Cool-Max "Adaptor" sleeping-bag liner with "insect+shield" ... a $55 expenditure.

I began to read everything I could find on the subject.

[Disrespectful comments and name-calling are in violation of Trailspace policy, hence have been edited out - moderator]

I did.

I tried about a dozen insect repellants.  The best is "ULTRA-Thon" by 3M.   It is made with something identified as N,N-Diethyl-m-Toluamide (31.58%)       Others worked to some degree, but not as well.

In my opinion, one should use just about everything (treated clothing, nets, etc.)  mentioned in the posts above, in combination with this 3M "ULTRA-Thon".

Bathe with Jewelweed soap, before and after hiking / backpacking.   This stuff is primarily for poison ivy and oak ... but, it does aid in preventing bug bites to some degree.  There  is a companion product -- Jewelweed Salve, that helps quell the itch  from any insect bites or stings that do occur.

Email: poisonivystop@yahoo.com

I bought about $20 worth of their products (several cakes of soap and containers of the salve).

The female mosquito is the culprit.   She seeks out a good blood host.

I happen to be one of those.

If friends are having a cook-out, deck party or pool party, guests are always pleased to know when Robert (me) will be attending..   They know they will NOT be bitten by mosquitoes.

That was THEN; this is NOW.   Using this stuff I mentioned keeps mosquitoes at bay.

Not 100% effective or perfect.   But, not bad ... not bad.

~ r2 ~

2:03 p.m. on October 10, 2011 (EDT)
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Sounds like you found a solution that works, Robert. I'll bring you on every trip to act as the sacrificial lamb. N, N-Diethyl-m-Tolumide = DEET, still the most effective.

2:29 p.m. on October 10, 2011 (EDT)
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Erich,

The 3M Ultrathon is the 3M timed-release product I mentioned in my post above. It is DEET, but in nano-capsule form so that it releases slowly over time. As I mentioned above (and a number of other posts on insect repellent, including in my article on Barb's and my Alaska trip to get up close and personal with the Big Furry Guys), I have found Ultrathon to work quite well, especially in combination with Permethrin-impregnated clothing like Ex Officio's Buzz-Off. Note that I am NOT "endorsing" any products, just noting that certain ones seem to work well FOR ME. There are other companies that sell permethrin-impregnated clothing and timed-release DEET. Picaridin works for me, though not as well as timed-release DEET. Note that I also posted that there is a genetic aspect - some people are more "sweet" for mosquitos (and black flies, noseeums, gnats, and other critters) than others. Sawyers times-release DEET repellant also seems to work reasonably well. Some people seem to find SkinSoSoft to work for them (just seems to attract more mosquitos to any and all bare skin on me), some find Jungle Juice or that black pine tar stuff that is sold up in Maine to work for them (but not for me).

Timed-release DEET apparently is not as readily absorbed through the skin as straight DEET, which is another advantage in addition to lasting longer. Picaridin is supposed to have the advantage of not being absorbed as readily, as well.

As mentioned above, DEET has the additional disadvantage of interacting with certain plastics (I have had it dissolve watch cases and wrist straps, including the case of a very expensive wrist-mount heart rate monitor), though the timed-release products appear to be less corrosive to plastics.

I have not found any of the combination sunblock-insect repellant lotions to work very well as repellants - I never got more than 10 minutes before the mosquitos were again landing on every available piece of bare skin.

Again, remember - your personal genetics seems to make a difference, as does your diet. Experiment and use what works for YOU, not what works for someone else. And do heed the cautions on use of any insecticide (which is what many of the repellants actually are.

3:58 p.m. on October 10, 2011 (EDT)
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Hmmm ....

I suppose (?) Bill S. is acknowledging tacit validation for my post.

Thanks, Bill S.  

~ r 2 ~

6:22 p.m. on November 10, 2011 (EST)
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Has anyone tried the high frequency "repellant" emmitter apps on smart phones? I've seen them with positive reviews but have no experience using them.

While anecdotal, I can say that I eat copious amounts of Garlicky, oniony, spicy, and pepper infused foods. I am the only one in my family of 4, and I am the only one who gets 1-2 bites on a bad night of skeeters, while the rest of my family gets destroyed, even with repellant. Interestingly enough, neither my 2 children nor my wife eat the aftorementioned food types.

The ExOfficio stuff does work on my kids, who each have a ls crew shirts.

7:25 p.m. on November 10, 2011 (EST)
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GARLIC internally worked for me all across Alaska where they are the worst I have ever seen. Worn around the neck it keeps vampires away too :)

9:44 p.m. on November 10, 2011 (EST)
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+1 to Ultrathon and a daily clove of garlic. Also, if you're gonna be in the area for over a week, let a couple dozen bite you the first day; for likely many reasons, doing this seems to both keep other mosquitoes away (maybe they can sense it's no longer "virgin" blood...) later on, and reduces the severity/duration of future bites. (Maybe you're already conditioned to them, and so your reduced flailing leads to reduced respiration, and thus, reduced CO2 output...)

10:38 p.m. on November 10, 2011 (EST)
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Ned Kelly suit

10:12 a.m. on November 11, 2011 (EST)
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The absolute best surefire all natural way to a mosquito free trip.  

SNOW!!!

10:59 a.m. on November 11, 2011 (EST)
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Robert Rowe said:

Rick-Pittsburgh said:

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/gear-selection/topics/90392.html

 


In my opinion, one should use just about everything (treated clothing, nets, etc.)  mentioned in the posts above, in combination with this 3M "ULTRA-Thon".

 IF anyone takes this portion of the advice, please remember not to mix chemicals together. Some can have reactions to one another that are quite dangerous. IF you are not a chemist, don't do it. The post may well mean one chemical plus all of the non chemical suggestions. Having been victim to people, mixing chemicals and unwittingly creating chlorine gas (not repellant related) I tend to be very cautious when giving anyone advice about a chemical product.

2:12 p.m. on November 11, 2011 (EST)
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giftogab said:

Robert Rowe said:

Rick-Pittsburgh said:

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/gear-selection/topics/90392.html

 

In my opinion, one should use just about everything (treated clothing, nets, etc.)  mentioned in the posts above, in combination with this 3M "ULTRA-Thon".

 IF anyone takes this portion of the advice, please remember not to mix chemicals together. Some can have reactions to one another that are quite dangerous. IF you are not a chemist, don't do it. The post may well mean one chemical plus all of the non chemical suggestions. Having been victim to people, mixing chemicals and unwittingly creating chlorine gas (not repellant related) I tend to be very cautious when giving anyone advice about a chemical product.

I understand your reluctance of using some of these chemicals together and it is well founded. For me I'm off to Thailand and have started my round of shots for skeeter born diseases. The fact that I'm getting shots and oral immunizations does not mean I'm 100% protected. The idea over there is, regardless of inoculations, to still take every precaution as to not get bit period. It's not just an annoyance as it is here it's more a matter of life and death, or at least much suffering. I will be soaking all my own (outer) clothing and netting including the tent netting in with pyrethrum treating outer clothing. I’m trying to determine if treating the tent body itself  with pyrethrum will harm the tent (I don’t believe it will).  I will be wearing neoprene fingerless gloves for fishing and bring neoprene full finger gloves as well. I have a shemagh that I will soak in pyrethrum as well to be worn when netting is not the appropriate attire. I have purchased an army head net to be worn over a hat that has the sun flaps in back as netting needs to needs to be kept away from the skin. I will be using the time released DEET. I truly believe that DEET is really bad for you but the alternative is getting things like malaria and hemorrhagic fever. This will be a trying time as I will be in a warm tropical wonderland in which one would rather reduce ones clothing rather than increasing ones clothing. Should be interesting, to say the least, as I'm walking around rural Thailand all netted up amongst all the native peoples.

2:40 p.m. on November 11, 2011 (EST)
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MoZee said:

The absolute best surefire all natural way to a mosquito free trip.  

SNOW!!!

 +1 !


DSCN2819.jpg

6:18 p.m. on November 15, 2011 (EST)
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XterroBrando said:

MoZee said:

The absolute best surefire all natural way to a mosquito free trip.  

SNOW!!!

 +1 !


DSCN2819.jpg

 and + another,   but it must be full snow

9:44 p.m. on November 15, 2011 (EST)
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As soon as I figure out how to get full snow in Florida I'll try it out.  

10:03 p.m. on November 15, 2011 (EST)
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ocalacomputerguy said:

As soon as I figure out how to get full snow in Florida I'll try it out.  

Here, I have found a way to make, get, have snow in FL on the cheap. If you want a lot of snow you'll have to contact any of the ski areas who are upgrading their snow making abilities and selling their used snow making equipment. If you need help finding cheap institutionalized snow making equipment designed for ski areas I can most likely help as for some reason I have this inane ability to find this shtuff.

This equipment may help in the ability to make it so that those of you have snow and or winter withdrawal, due to your addictions, to be able to more easily work your way into the spring summer seasons.

 

 

 

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/American-DJ-SNOW-FLURRY-Snow-Machine-Snow-Machine-/360409829989?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item53ea199265

6:56 a.m. on November 16, 2011 (EST)
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My neighbor has one of those machines. the "snow" smells like coconut tanning oil.

1:08 p.m. on November 16, 2011 (EST)
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ocalacomputerguy said:

My neighbor has one of those machines. the "snow" smells like coconut tanning oil.

Uh, whoda thunki................does it use jsut water to make "snow'  If so what is the process that could make it smell like tanning oil?

8:48 p.m. on November 16, 2011 (EST)
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It's fake snow.  It uses a soap like liquid which has the coconut scent.  It produces a foam that looks realistic from about 25 feet. 

8:51 p.m. on November 16, 2011 (EST)
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Ahhhh, but no cooling effect?

3:10 p.m. on November 28, 2011 (EST)
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My colleague who spent two years in NE Honduras adjacent the large, jungle swamp there, agreed that Naturalpel..a combination of eucalyptus oil and lemon oil, reputed to last four hours per application, worked very well, and for almost exactly four hours!  I have MD friends who have used this repellent with very good results, especially with children.  The doctors strongly advise against any DEET because it is absorbed through the skin and into the blood system. On one outing, one of my MD friends told me to use a very small amount of the DEET around my collar, on my shirt cuffs, and on my hat and hat-brim.  And thereafter to wash of my fingers with which I had applied the DEET.  (Look for the combination of eucalyptus oil and lemon oil; another brand-name is REPEL which has this combination.)

I no longer use any DEET at all, but have continued with the Naturalpel or REPEL products which are sold by my friendly REI stores.  We have had a couple of very wet and late thawing Spring months in the Northwest, and prolonged wetness equates to prolonged bugginess.  Spanish sherry and French Cognac applied to the face and hands and neck/ears has some effective repellent qualities; if some small amounts are ingested and allowed to release the aroma of the beverage and its alcohol content, I have found that there is a rather effective repellent quality, but re-application needs to occur every one or two hours.  No, this is not intended as a humorous comment, but actually works for some 'models and makes' of mosquitoes.  The aroma and evaporating alcohol seems to repel many of the bugs.  I know, the outdoorsman is much more relaxed and happier, too.  I should add that small amounts of the application are effective and do not impair the hiker but do repel many of the bugs.  We are talking about repelling bugs and not about social or festive drinking in this application.  Some social and festive activity may occur around the campfire after one is finished with the hiking for the day.  I said, 'some'; be temperate and responsible.  The best bug is a dead or departing bug!

4:05 p.m. on November 28, 2011 (EST)
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Howard Hayden said:

My colleague who spent two years in NE Honduras adjacent the large, jungle swamp there, agreed that Naturalpel..a combination of eucalyptus oil and lemon oil, reputed to last four hours per application, worked very well, and for almost exactly four hours!  I have MD friends who have used this repellent with very good results, especially with children.  The doctors strongly advise against any DEET because it is absorbed through the skin and into the blood system. On one outing, one of my MD friends told me to use a very small amount of the DEET around my collar, on my shirt cuffs, and on my hat and hat-brim.  And thereafter to wash of my fingers with which I had applied the DEET.  (Look for the combination of eucalyptus oil and lemon oil; another brand-name is REPEL which has this combination.)

I no longer use any DEET at all, but have continued with the Naturalpel or REPEL products which are sold by my friendly REI stores.  We have had a couple of very wet and late thawing Spring months in the Northwest, and prolonged wetness equates to prolonged bugginess.  Spanish sherry and French Cognac applied to the face and hands and neck/ears has some effective repellent qualities; if some small amounts are ingested and allowed to release the aroma of the beverage and its alcohol content, I have found that there is a rather effective repellent quality, but re-application needs to occur every one or two hours.  No, this is not intended as a humorous comment, but actually works for some 'models and makes' of mosquitoes.  The aroma and evaporating alcohol seems to repel many of the bugs.  I know, the outdoorsman is much more relaxed and happier, too.  I should add that small amounts of the application are effective and do not impair the hiker but do repel many of the bugs.  We are talking about repelling bugs and not about social or festive drinking in this application.  Some social and festive activity may occur around the campfire after one is finished with the hiking for the day.  I said, 'some'; be temperate and responsible.  The best bug is a dead or departing bug!

 

Hey Howard, thanks for your timely post. This is very helpful as I will be going as I will be leaving on a 6 week jaunt of Thailand and had not found a alternative to DEET with the exception of Permethrin which again you want to limit getting on your skin. I'm not sure why people think DEET is ok to use, but it's some really terrible stuff and should only be used when nothing else wither works or is available and even then it should be used sparingly. It is interesting to see when people try to trick themselves in thinking something is safe when it obviously is not. It has and does caused, many bad side effects and has even been a contributing factor in the deaths of people, not very many but it's none the less very bad stuff. I will be ordering some one or both of the of the repellants you mentioned in your post. Even though I will try the repellents that you have suggested I will be bringing DEET in the of chance that nothing else works.

 

 

Howard Hayden said:

"I no longer use any DEET at all, but have continued with the Naturalpel or REPEL products which are sold by my friendly REI stores."

All of my investigation reveals so far that some of the REPEL products contain 30%+/- DEET while others contain Permethin.  I willl now check out Naturalpel hopefuly that does not.

Repel (Permanone) Tick & Mosquitoes Repellent Aerosol 6 does nit contain DEET and contians  Permethin and is a clothing spray.

I will be going to Sportsman’s Warehouse today to see what I can find regarding effective products regarding insect repellant’s that do not contain DEET.

 

4:41 p.m. on November 28, 2011 (EST)
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2:13 p.m. on January 4, 2012 (EST)
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I aways use the deep woods off and dont use any soap with perfume in it. My experience has been that the more tender skin seems to be the most attractive to the little creatures.  i work outside and expose myself to the sun even when off work alot.  When i take off my boots my ankles are real vulnerable so i spray them good then im usually good.  I carry a head net but really have had to use it for knats. Camp location is real important as well.  The dry areas without standing water aer better

3:35 p.m. on January 4, 2012 (EST)
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Best defense against mosquitos? Hmmmm... SNOW !!!

7:52 p.m. on January 4, 2012 (EST)
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Don't need snow.  Just a cold snap like the one we just had. 

Gainesville, about 35 miles north of Ocala, set a record last night.  We were within 3 degrees of our record. 

I'm going try soaking strips of cloth with pyrethrin and hanging them around where I'm at this summer.  I'm going to try my back porch first and if it works try a "clothes line" of strips around my tent. 

7:49 p.m. on January 24, 2012 (EST)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

ooohfishy,

Here is a previous thread we had going not so long ago in regards to this matter. Breeze through it and take a look. Some of the info may very well be useful to you. Happy hiking.

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/gear-selection/topics/90392.html

 BINGO !  

Thanks, Rick.

BTW --WHY do the site administrators CLOSE a topic, such as this one?

This was one of the most informative dialogues to which sooo many of us contributed.

    ~ r2 ~

10:43 p.m. on January 24, 2012 (EST)
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While moderators and admins do have the ability to lock a thread if there are problems, topics actually self close after a preset period of posting inactivity. The thread Rick linked to was begun in March of 2011. The last comment was posted just over a year ago.  This particular thread was started in August of last year, but there have been enough sporadic posts to keep it going.

12:33 a.m. on January 25, 2012 (EST)
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Yeah, what f_klock said. :)

7:51 a.m. on January 25, 2012 (EST)
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+3 to snow

5:40 p.m. on January 26, 2012 (EST)
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Another snow vote here ;)

Natrapel and eucalytpus oil have worked pretty well for me in the Cascades so far. I prefer to avoid Deet, partly because it's a nasty chemical and partly because it dissolves plastics. Bug nets work well, and so does a stiff breeze. Mosquitoes aren't particularly strong fliers, so a stiff breeze keeps them away quite nicely.

When the bug season starts up again here, I'm going to experiment with Citronella candles in a UCO candle lantern.

 

9:18 a.m. on January 27, 2012 (EST)
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deet is also flammable and breaks down rubber. I was previously a lineman and we found that deet broke down our rubber gloves. Now they use stuff thats like bug candy

2:12 p.m. on January 28, 2012 (EST)
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A can of Raid and a match

3:32 p.m. on January 29, 2012 (EST)
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Like I said eat a lil garlic. I mix a lil in all my meals except oatmeal. In Alaska it kept the mosquitos from biting and even landing, but not out of my ears buzzing away.  It also works against chiggers and ticks, flies and other insects that land on you. I think it goes out in your sweat pores and keeps them away?

12:03 a.m. on January 30, 2012 (EST)
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How long does the garlic remain effective after you stop eating it ?

~ r2 ~

7:40 a.m. on January 30, 2012 (EST)
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omatty said:

deet is also flammable and breaks down rubber. I was previously a lineman and we found that deet broke down our rubber gloves. Now they use stuff thats like bug candy

 I had a boonie hat that I used to spray up to keep the bugs away at work.  I left it on top of my file cabinet one night, and when I removed it the next day, it peeled the paint of in a nice neat circle, right down to the clean metal. Makes you wonder....

9:44 a.m. on January 30, 2012 (EST)
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Usually about a few hours, enough to go between meals. You can also use the Garlic tablets that are sold in heath food stores as well, that way you don't have to eat the garlic in everything. In Alaska I got to where I just ate a clove of garlic every couple hours. I grew up eating onions raw so garlic is'nt any harder to get used to eating raw.

1:49 p.m. on March 3, 2012 (EST)
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Has anyone used the frequency emitter apps on smart phones? not sure if they work or not...

 

7:09 p.m. on March 3, 2012 (EST)
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Haven't heard of an app for that! I have heard of a mosquito ringtone though. Teachers can't hear it but young kids can.

12:39 a.m. on March 4, 2012 (EST)
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My votes go for 3M Ultrathon, Sawer's Permethrin clothing & gear treatment, plus wearing treated clothing that covers your arms, legs, etc.

I have not found citronella, electronic devices, skin so soft, vitamin supplements, etc. to work very well for me in the areas I frequent.

Mike G.

1:09 a.m. on March 4, 2012 (EST)
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I have found that a ring of citronella torches around a campfire does fairly well. I think the flames overload the mosquitoes senses. 

6:21 a.m. on March 4, 2012 (EST)
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Besides snow, another very effective way to ward off mosquitoes is camping in windy locations, up and away from bodies of water.  Ridgelines, balds, and draws are good candidates.

Ed

11:37 p.m. on March 4, 2012 (EST)
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Garlic is also good for the Bats, u U o OO OOO HAAAA HAAAAA or Dracula

12:58 a.m. on March 5, 2012 (EST)
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Callahan said:

Garlic is also good for the Bats, u U o OO OOO HAAAA HAAAAA or Dracula

 Yes but is it good against the new sparkly ones like Edward?

7:06 a.m. on March 5, 2012 (EST)
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whomeworry said:

Besides snow, another very effective way to ward off mosquitoes is camping in windy locations, up and away from bodies of water.  Ridgelines, balds, and draws are good candidates.

Ed

 

Yes, but draws are NOTORIOUS  for scads and scads of TICKS; especially, deer ticks ... which harbor the Lyme's Disease neurotoxin. 

Deer gravitate to the draws for protection against coyotes and wolves.   Hence; deer ticks in abundance.

                     pax vobiscum

                          ~ r2 ~

3:56 p.m. on March 12, 2012 (EDT)
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For what it's worth (anecdotal only) I saw two hikers in heavy mosquito territory. The one with the black T-shirt was covered in them, while the one in the light shirt just had a few and they weren't biting.

I've definitely found that the first few bites every year are the itchiest and most annoying, and I'll be bombing them with Afterbite, but after that the severity of the reaction fades away and I'm okay for the rest of the summer. Maybe it's possible to acquire a resistance to the venom?

August 1, 2014
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