what is your greatest experience backpacking?

10:19 p.m. on May 12, 2012 (EDT)
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What is your greatest experience backpacking?Things you have seen or done?

9:01 a.m. on May 14, 2012 (EDT)
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Mine would have to be a trip in the Tetons last year:

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/trip-reports/topics/117445.html

10:50 a.m. on May 14, 2012 (EDT)
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Wow , I want to go there! Thank God for cameras !

10:53 a.m. on May 14, 2012 (EDT)
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Too many to calculate.  Surviving winters in a tipi with a woodstove is sweet.  Being in a good tent during an all-night rainstorm is great.  The first step on a 20 day trip with a heavy pack may be the best feeling of all.

2:58 p.m. on May 14, 2012 (EDT)
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My best experience was a month long hike I did in the Grand Canyon in 1999. I hiked for 28 days and walked 256 miles covering much of the canyons area from the Bass Trail to the Little Colorado, plus side trips to Clear Creek, Ribbon Falls and the North Rim. I had wanted to do something like this for a long time. I hiked the canyon every Fall, Winter and Spring from 1983-03 but just on 2 week average long hikes. I started the trip by caching 4 food caches along the way of a week each so I would not have to carry all the food and water for the whole trip. I hiked an average of 9 miles a day. I did the hike in January when the canyon was the coolest below the rim. My favorite months to hike are Dec/Jan. This is when the tourist hikers are the least and the backcountry is most open. The Grand Canyon see's about 5 million visitors a year with about a quarter of them hiking in on dayhikes and overnighters.


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3:18 p.m. on May 14, 2012 (EDT)
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A late spring ski trip along what is known as Dave Beck’s Haute Route, an east/west traverse of the Sierras.  The weather was perfect, and we had no need to reroute or implement any contingency plans one anticipates for a trip of this order.  Everyone stayed healthy, no gear mal functioned.  The trip lasted over two weeks, allowing for plenty of zero day side trips.  We had three food caches so packs were not too heavy.  Good company, great scenery.  The only reason I did not regret the trip ending was my lips were pretty chap.

Ed

1:30 a.m. on May 15, 2012 (EDT)
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GaryPalmer said:

 

My best experience was a month long hike I did in the Grand Canyon in 1999. I hiked for 28 days and walked 256 miles covering much of the canyons area from the Bass Trail to the Little Colorado, plus side trips to Clear Creek, Ribbon Falls and the North Rim. I had wanted to do something like this for a long time. I hiked the canyon every Fall, Winter and Spring from 1983-03 but just on 2 week average long hikes. I started the trip by caching 4 food caches along the way of a week each so I would not have to carry all the food and water for the whole trip. I hiked an average of 9 miles a day. I did the hike in January when the canyon was the coolest below the rim. My favorite months to hike are Dec/Jan. This is when the tourist hikers are the least and the backcountry is most open. The Grand Canyon see's about 5 million visitors a year with about a quarter of them hiking in on dayhikes and overnighters.


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1:31 a.m. on May 15, 2012 (EDT)
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wow, to go on that long of a hick would be great, gotta do it myself sometime.

11:29 a.m. on May 15, 2012 (EDT)
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One is when the dingo's came into camp.

4:59 p.m. on May 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Don't have a lot of experience, but my favorite hike was when I was in the boyscouts we did a 120 mile section of the Pacific crest trail in 14 days, I remember some of the boys going home at our supply spot that was halfway through...one I had to go back and find him the first day and I carried his pack the last mile and a half...that night I saw him pull out CANNED FOOD, I was so mad at him for being that stupid. He was one of the ones who went home halfway through had blisters everywhere from wearing regular sneakers with no socks. I still laugh about that to this day.

1:34 a.m. on May 19, 2012 (EDT)
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Greatest experience? That's hard to say. I can say the most difficult hike I ever completed was the GR-20. The Grande Randonnee number 20 is considered to be the most difficult of all the Great Routes in France. The Fra La Monti (GR-20) travels about 100 miles across the island of Corsica from North to South. It features 44,000 feet of up and down and resembles a class 3 climb more than a hiking trail in some spots.

8:57 a.m. on May 19, 2012 (EDT)
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Eppo said:


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Greatest experience? That's hard to say. I can say the most difficult hike I ever completed was the GR-20. The Grande Randonnee number 20 is considered to be the most difficult of all the Great Routes in France. The Fra La Monti (GR-20) travels about 100 miles across the island of Corsica from North to South. It features 44,000 feet of up and down and resembles a class 3 climb more than a hiking trail in some spots.

 Good for you!

11:23 p.m. on May 19, 2012 (EDT)
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jchanman33 said:

Don't have a lot of experience, but my favorite hike was when I was in the boyscouts we did a 120 mile section of the Pacific crest trail in 14 days, I remember some of the boys going home at our supply spot that was halfway through...one I had to go back and find him the first day and I carried his pack the last mile and a half...that night I saw him pull out CANNED FOOD, I was so mad at him for being that stupid. He was one of the ones who went home halfway through had blisters everywhere from wearing regular sneakers with no socks. I still laugh about that to this day.

 Yeah normally the fleshly people don't make it on a hick as they have to stop and comfort thereselves every 5 minutes.this is part of the fun ruffing it I thought.

7:18 p.m. on July 26, 2012 (EDT)
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Wow nice list.  My best backpacking trip was the Chiloot Trail, Alaska and BC.  Most of my lifelong best trips have been with a string of mules, a canoe, or a raft.

12:03 p.m. on August 2, 2012 (EDT)
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most enjoyable? on the scale of manageable but challenging....

hiking the high peaks in the adirondacks, meaning the line formed by the wolfjaws, armstrong, gothics, saddleback, haystack, marcy, then diverting to avalanche lake and mt. colden.  really interesting topography - cool open/exposed rock and cables on gothics, and a trap dike and slide that can lead from Avalanche Lake up to the summit of Mt. Colden.

also the southern and northern presidentials in the white mountains, which can be hiked in a line over a few days or the better part of a week.  again, unique landscape for the Northeast.    

i like these hikes because they are do-able - not horrifically difficult - but still plenty to do physically and some pretty amazing views and experiences. 

11:53 a.m. on August 3, 2012 (EDT)
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I have had many great trips in the last 35 years of adventure travel. I spend an average of 275 nights a year backpacking and bicycle touring. I only spend an average of 90 days a year in towns like Jackson and national parks working.

I have done way more trips than I can mention here in the last 35 years. I have traveled in Alaska, California, Wyoming, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Arkansas, New York and have been thru 75% of the US by bicycle and foot (hitchhiking).

12:53 p.m. on August 8, 2012 (EDT)
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ppine said:

Wow nice list.  My best backpacking trip was the Chiloot Trail, Alaska and BC.  Most of my lifelong best trips have been with a string of mules, a canoe, or a raft.

 The Chilkoot Pass Trail is historically significant because of the Gold Rush of 1898.  It spans the US and Canada, over the Coast Range and is home to griz, caribou, moose, wolverine, wolf and lots of other critters.  The weather is a challenge even in summer.  The other hikers were from all over the world.  The trip had everything and I would do it again.

1:32 p.m. on August 8, 2012 (EDT)
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John Muir and High Sierra Trails solo in 1981. Spur of the moment, totally at my own speed, no stove, no tent (tarp, used two nights), eat low-sleep high, hike dawn to sunset, great weather all the way, swim every day, first night on Half Dome, last night out stealth camping in a fire-hollowed giant sequoia. Kinda lonesome at times, though.

7:49 p.m. on November 1, 2012 (EDT)
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My best experience would be an ascent of Mt Taranaki (New Zealand), starting at 8pm on the 31st December 2010 and returning to base camp at 3am on the 1st January 2011.

We raced up that mountain with only the bare basics under an awesome sunset and watched the most awesome fireworks show I've seen in my life at midnight while having a well deserved drink on the summit to celebrate the new year before one of the scariest descents I've ever made.

One day we'll do it in a night again, but in the middle of winter and with a bit more planning.

12:01 p.m. on November 2, 2012 (EDT)
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Like many others have stated, there are way too many to list, ranging over the past 45 years.  But a couple stand out.  One is the first trip I took with my wife, after working to convince her that she actually might like backpacking.  That trip was pleasant, to the Clark Fork in the Carson-Iceberg Wilderness. 

 

But what really sealed the deal was that on the drive home from the trailhead, she admitted that she really loved it, and would welcome another trip like that.

 

The next day we were back in Yosemite, hiking up Illilouette Canyon...

 

And we haven't stopped since.

9:13 p.m. on November 3, 2012 (EDT)
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tam1852 said:

What is your greatest experience backpacking?Things you have seen or done?

A couple things come to mind when I think of my "greatest experience backpacking".

The first was a summer I spent in the White Mountains of New Hampshire in my late teens.  It wasn't just a backpacking trip - I alternated between short backpacking segments and camping with my bike (bicycle) at roadside campgrounds.  Many times I'd ride into towns to pick up supplies, and other times my Dad drove up from Massachusetts to help out.

The second one is my JMT trip this summer.  This was a 30-day trip which, for me, was an "epic" adventure.   Again, I had support, this time from several people who helped in various ways.  I also spent many weeks planning & preparing for the trip and picked up supplies at 5 different points along the way.  Although I had seen some of the segments  of the route before, most of it was new territory for me, making it even more of an "adventure".

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