newbie, gear and other advice

1:59 a.m. on July 15, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. mikec him, mikechmi

Hey Everyone,

I am completely new to backpacking and hiking and I'm just looking for some advice. I've car camped enough times to have no fears about that and I am also a first aid instructor. I just graduated college and am gonna travel around the US for a couple months to not only look at grad schools but also view the natural beauty that this country has to offer. I figure what better way then camping in the back country. I'm going to be doing everything solo and will be starting soon so I don't see me having the time to take a course or anything. As of now I have a GPS, safewater anywhere in-line filter 90oz hyrdro back, a hammock, hunting knife. I'm looking into back packs right now. I figure most or my trips will be 4 days or so, some more some less. I'd like to spend no more then $150 (did I mention I'm poor and that is a consideration for everything) and am leaning towards the kelty trekker, kelty coyote, Camp trails appollo or velocity, or Kelty Red Cloud 5400 or 5000. I'm also gonna pick up first aid kits, moleskin, etc. I have a coleman two burner stove but it is kind of heavy, anything cheap, light, and good out there? Sorry this is so long. Any other things I can do to prepare, I read trailsides Hiking & Backpacking book, and Walking, and ordered the SAS wilderness surivival guide (I realize books can't compare to the real thing). Also any advice on getting permits on national parks like the Grand Canyon, since It takes 3 months ahead of time and I really have no clue when my travels will take me there (I'm starting east coast and heading west). Anyway any advice, help, etc you can give would be great. If this was all discussed elsewhere feel free to attack me, thanks in advance and hope to see you out there

2:02 a.m. on July 15, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. mikec him, mikechmi
ohh yeah

Just so you don't have to tell me I realize I can't rely on GPS gotta get a compas (any recomendations cheap and good) and a map along with the skills.

12:25 p.m. on July 15, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: ohh yeah

For heaven sake, don't take that colman stove. YIKES! If you want light and dirt cheap, see the last issue of Backpacker Mag. Make a tuna tin stove. I'm not sure how effective it is, but it's light and it's cheap, cheap, cheap.

1:53 p.m. on July 15, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: ohh yeah

I'm sure ANY of the economy prices butane burners would do you very well. Same goes for all the gear. With price being a major issue and that ruling out new high line gear I'd let weight be major factor I'd choosing one particular peice of gear over another. Don't over accessorize. Remember the KISS principle. The cheaper stuff will do you fine but may not hold up as well as the pricy $tuff. Just have enough to be prepared and have fun with a little improvising !

6:15 p.m. on July 15, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: ohh yeah

Being

4:54 p.m. on July 16, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. mikec him, mikechmi
thanks

Thanks for the advice everyone, I think I'm gonna get the markell devil stove, light and only $20. Gonna hit the army surplus for a compass. Borrowing a good sleeping bag so thats set, hopefully leaving soon.

mike

8:48 a.m. on July 17, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Steve
Re: ohh yeah

Kelty is a good company that makes quality gear in almost every department. If you want a pack for (4) day outings...a 4500-5500 cu. in. pack would be ideal. Make sure that the pack is very compressible for some of your shorter outings. When you compress the pack it will sit closer to your body making it more comfortable and easier for you to balance.
A good (relitively) inexpensive stove is Mountain Safety Research(MSR) Pocket Rocket. It has a review in this months Backpacker magazine. It's $30 and uses the canisters...each canister is just under $5 and would probably last you 2-3 days each. I have the MSR Whisperlite, which is the standard in backpacking stoves. It's $50 dollars, runs on white gas(easy to get, and cheap), and will last you for the rest of your backpacking days.
If you still need a sleeping bag, then also look into a synthetic Kelty bag (20

7:17 p.m. on July 17, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. RyanH, RyanhH
Re: ohh yeah

Quote:

Being

9:17 a.m. on July 18, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

A few comments

A few comments:

Sign on to Sierra Trading Post's web site -- www.sierratradingpost.com

9:26 a.m. on July 18, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

A few comments

What has happened to me. First time in two years I double posted. Sorry all.

Anyway, go to www.sierratradingpost.com. They have great deals on a lot of camping equipment. For example, Jansport Haute Route 5000 ci internal frame pack for $99.95. Also good prices on sleeping bags and other equipment.

One person mentioned forgetting the tent and just getting a tarp. Think a bit before you go that route. It depends where you are and how long you are gonna be out. It takes a lot of skill to stay dry all night in the rain if you don't have a tent.

Same goes for running shoes versus boots. Wet feet can mean blisters, which makes life miserable. At the same time, do not get really heavy boots, they are almost never worth the weight (putting aside winter conditions).

For a stove, I would consider something that uses white gas. If you're gonna be out a lot, it's a lot cheaper to use over time. Just make sure you learn how to light the stove properly.

11:17 p.m. on July 18, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Mo' stuff!

There are lighter stoves out there for cheaper - If you can, get hold of a primus yellowstone classic (check Campmoor and STP, I got a peak 1 Solo on sale for $12 (doubt you will find one that cheap), The Markhill is a good stove, just heavy.

Get a Suunto or Silva orienteering compass, the most basic type and it's all you need, much easier to use than the military type, for $8 to $10.

One tent option is not to tent, but to bug screen. Walrus Trekker tarp insert, basically a two man mesh tent with a watertight bathtub floor, made to go under the Walrus Trekker tarp, but can stand alone. Under 2 pounds and under $100, and NO BUGS!!

11:31 p.m. on July 18, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. mikec him, mikechmi
thanks, help with boot choices?

Thanks,

I've checked out sierratradingpost a few days ago and love thier bargain barn section. Boots at 80% can't be beat. I'm considering either the PAMIR HIKING BOOT by TREZETA of Italy, MIDWEIGHT BACKPACKING BOOTS by FIVE TEN, ODYSSEY BACKPACK BOOT by GARMONT any suggestions as to which is best

11:33 p.m. on July 18, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. mikec him, mikechmi
also this boot

WATERPROOF VOYAGEUR PORTAGE BOOT by IRISH SETTER

12:00 p.m. on July 19, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: ohh yeah

A fine example of how people

9:34 p.m. on July 19, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. mikechim, mikechmi
thanks

Thanks, I found the camplite stove for $20 and I think I'm gonna go with that.

Quote:

There are lighter stoves out there for cheaper - If you can, get hold of a primus yellowstone classic (check Campmoor and STP, I got a peak 1 Solo on sale for $12 (doubt you will find one that cheap), The Markhill is a good stove, just heavy.

Get a Suunto or Silva orienteering compass, the most basic type and it's all you need, much easier to use than the military type, for $8 to $10.

One tent option is not to tent, but to bug screen. Walrus Trekker tarp insert, basically a two man mesh tent with a watertight bathtub floor, made to go under the Walrus Trekker tarp, but can stand alone. Under 2 pounds and under $100, and NO BUGS!!

9:35 p.m. on July 19, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

oops meant the Primus Yellowstone Lite Trail Stove (nt)

(nt)

4:48 p.m. on July 20, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Boots by mail

Don't buy boots by mail unless you have experience with that particular boot line or better yet that particular boot. You need something that fits well, and you can really only do that in a store and spending some time with the boots on your feet.

-dave-

7:40 p.m. on July 21, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: thanks, help with boot choices?

you can't fit boots properly through the mail. The stiffer and more heavy duty a boot the greater the need for a proper fit, its not like a pair of sneakers that will flex with your feet. Also be skeptical of 50%+ off boots. It is a good indication that it was probably an unpopular model for a good reason. Buy some hiking socks and liner socks, worth the money, they make a big difference

December 27, 2014
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