About | Blog | Forums | People | Free Newsletter
Trailspace is a product review site for outdoor enthusiasts. Use it to find and share great gear.

Filter vs. Purification

2:41 a.m. on August 30, 2010 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1 forum posts

Just want to see what everyone thinks on the subject of Filtering water (pump) vs. Purification (tablets).

I am making a list of gear that I hope to buy before January 2011 and am stuck on what to get for cleaning water.

6:22 a.m. on August 30, 2010 (EDT)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
1,669 reviewer rep
1,275 forum posts

This is a very common topic, you can find alot of prior posts on it by searching.

But I prefer a filter as my primary means. I use an MSR Miniworks EX and could not be happier with it. I also carry a small bottle of aquamira in my survival kit as a backup.

There alot of semi negative reviews out there on the miniworks, don't let them fool you. They almost all say that it gets hard to pump, and some say it got hard to pump and then broke. Well, if they bothered to read the instructions they would have seen that when it gets hard to pump or takes more than 95 or so pumps to get a liter then it is time to clean the filter element! Cleaning is simple and only takes a min or two.

I like the Miniworks because it is reliable, tough, and easy to use/maintain. It's filter has a charcoal core which is very nice, it takes out any bad tastes out of the water as well as alot of chemicals.

It really comes down to where you are hiking. For me, I have to have a filter because my water sources range from natural springs, to an old muddy puddle from the last rain, to a swampy marsh.

If you are hiking an area with alot of springs and whatnot like the AT, then you can easily get by with a steripen or aquamira. I have friends that use both of those, and I have to say that it does make the water safe, but does not improve the taste. So if the water is from a spring it is fine, but if it is from say a marshy pond, it will still taste like nasty swamp water even though it's safe.

It's a personal choice, for me I will take the extra weight of a filter.(The miniworks is one of the heavier filters, not a big deal though really)

12:06 p.m. on August 30, 2010 (EDT)
TOP 10 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
2,234 reviewer rep
5,182 forum posts

Aaron,

Take a look at my series on water treatment here on Trailspace. There are also a number of reviews of specific water filters in the Trailspace Gear Reviews as well, along with many very long threads by posters arguing the virtues of their favorite methods and devices.

Do not be misled by the frequent misuse of the terms - water needs to be "potable" to be safe to drink. It needs to be "pure" to be used for first aid purposes, and "sterile" for surgical use. Neither chemical treatments (such as halogen pills - iodine and chlorine, including chlorine dioxide) nor backpacking filters purify water in the technically correct meaning of "purify" - they make the water potable, which means safe to drink IF used properly. Boiling and UV treatment also make the water potable, with boiling can sterilize the water as far as organisms go. None of these methods will remove chemical contamination (mine, industrial, and agricultural runoff) using backpackable methods.

2:47 p.m. on August 30, 2010 (EDT)
195 reviewer rep
1,158 forum posts

I have an older PUR Hiker filter(now Katadyn)and it's a tried and true standby and popular with the hiking crowd. I don't use purification tablets as I can't see living on iodine or chlorine for most of my life. Some people swear by the UV light, Steripen?, which I've heard has some problemos in the winter and at 0F. Then again, in those temps you can just boil up a couple liters every day(carry a lot of fuel). You'll have to anyway since the filter is probably frozen. A frozen Hiker filter can be thawed and used though I'm not sure on the reliability of a filter after it's been frozen, etc. I've done it and never got sick . . . . . or did I? What about those large piles of pancake batter turtleheads I left thruout NC and TN? Hmmm . . . . . . . .

The paper cartridge in the Hiker filter can be silted up pretty fast in a mud seep but on my last trip after this happened I found a fast flowing creek and took it apart and cleaned the mud out between the paper folds, and it worked 50% better. Filter cartridges aren't cheap, now around $30, so I go thru about 2 a year. Much less though for the weekend crowd.

12:43 a.m. on September 16, 2010 (EDT)
23 reviewer rep
7 forum posts

Aaron,

I have used all kinds of pump filters and purifiers. My personal experience has led to:

1. Purifying kills most of the harmful stuff, is light, but doesnt improve color, taste, or particles.

2. Filters usually are heavy, take a lot of effort to pump, and most I have seen do not filter small contaminates like viruses.

I stumbled across a system from Europe that exhibited at the Summer OR show a couple years ago and I was very impressed. They were off in the corner on the mezzanine so they had practically zero traffic the whole time, but had an amazing product: http://www.lifesaversystems.com/ which filters even viruses which is very impressive.

I ultimately bought 2 later on through their US distribution website (I think it is HTI, but not sure if they are the distributor anymore: http://www.htiops.com/)

The bottle is bigger and heavier than I would like, but not much different than other filters. The nice thing is it also holds the water that is filtered, so has a 2 in 1 purpose, so in some cases it can replace the need for me to carry a hydration bladder full of water constantly.

9:36 a.m. on September 16, 2010 (EDT)
21 reviewer rep
148 forum posts

When in the slightest doubt, use liquid Aqua-Mira. When there is no doubt, drink heartily.

1:53 p.m. on September 16, 2010 (EDT)
21 reviewer rep
148 forum posts

Just an observation. I hike a great deal on the A.T. as I live relatively close in Pa. I have the oppurtunity to meet a lot of long distance and through hikers and I also managed a hostel that sat right on the trail. I saw a lot of intestinal problems over the years and although I never compiled any stats. I can say unequivacably that the majority of those that had debilitating problems were using filters. In fact I can`t remember one that used the Aqua-Mira saying they had a problem. I truely think more honest study needs to go into this scenario.

2:19 p.m. on September 16, 2010 (EDT)
TOP 10 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
2,234 reviewer rep
5,182 forum posts

BDO,

Did you ask the ones with problems about their sanitary practices? That is, did they and their companions (the food preparers) diligently wash their hands and/or use hand sanitizer before touching any food? In the studies in the Sierra and Rockies, the vast majority of people with problems who were surveyed had not been careful with personal hygiene practices.

9:22 p.m. on September 16, 2010 (EDT)
52 reviewer rep
2 forum posts

I use the Katahdyn Hiker Pro. I clean the filter regularly with regular to heavy use. It packs small and is easy to use. Ive never had any sickness problems with it and I have used it for months at a time. It will freeze up in very cold winter conditions on long hikes if you dont layer it with something in your pack. Overall...Im happy with it. I would use purification tablets for short hikes but I just dont feel comfortable ingesting them for multi week/month hiking. Thats not based on whats in the tablets..its just my personal preference.

9:57 p.m. on September 16, 2010 (EDT)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
1,018 reviewer rep
1,208 forum posts

BDO,

Did you ask the ones with problems about their sanitary practices? That is, did they and their companions (the food preparers) diligently wash their hands and/or use hand sanitizer before touching any food? In the studies in the Sierra and Rockies, the vast majority of people with problems who were surveyed had not been careful with personal hygiene practices.

Ohhhh, Ohhhhh!!!! I've been thinking about this for a long time and just waiting for the topic to re-appear so I could ask you about this, OGBO!

I've seen you comment on this several times. Each time (and then again when I'm out on the trail), I think about this, and wonder ... "how do 'they' know this?"

I'm curious about these studies. I'm asking not in a confrontational "no, this can't be right" kind of way. I'm just curious to know more about studies that asked people whether they washed their hands after they ... well, you know..." :) (shouldn't the typical answer be "yes, of course I did"?)

Meanwhile I carry my Campsuds, and look for a fragrance-free hand sanitizer to mitigate water usage :). The fact that I'm in the woods doesn't mean I'm willing to risk, ... ummm, ... "contaminants" getting into my food and drink any more than if I were at home.

1:54 p.m. on September 17, 2010 (EDT)
21 reviewer rep
148 forum posts

Is it true, I`ve heard that certain pathogens can enter the body and settle in their perspective places i.e. giardia in the guts just from bathing in contaminated water? If thats the case then it would explain some of the illnesses. Also I`ve heard that immunity is a factor, some people are just more susceptable to the problem. Also those that choose to use the Aqua-Mira drops such as my self do so only as a last resort when good spring water can1t be found instead of using a filter at all times and in all types of water so we are not as exposed to the bugs and we are more careful. If that makes any sense to anyone.

3:24 p.m. on September 18, 2010 (EDT)
121 reviewer rep
291 forum posts

I primarily use an MSR Miniworks filter, with the level of contaminants it removes, it could easily be referred to as a purifier. I researched the issue heavily about ten years ago when I first bought it. It passed Mil. Spec. testing for the Marine Recon. and I've not had an issue ever. As Rambler does, I carry potable aqua iodine tablets as a backup, in case the filter should break or if I'm left with no choice but to draw water from a really nasty source, I may filter then treat it just to make sure, but having just spent two years recovering from severe health issues relating to destruction of beneficial gut flora, I would not in any way want to drink Iodine or Chlorine laden water any more than absolutely necessary.

I just recently bought a Sweet Water pre-filter to add to the end of the hose that goes in the stream/water source. I like it a lot, it screens the water before it goes into the hose, thereby sparing the primary filter of the large stuff and even if laying on the bottom draws from the top surface to keep sediment out.

4:59 p.m. on September 18, 2010 (EDT)
MODERATOR TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
884 reviewer rep
3,432 forum posts

I use a Katadyn Hiker and follow up with chemical treatment, if I'm in a hurry I filter and pasteurize a liter to get me going.

I've never considered the weight of a filter a problem, although I can understand why thru-hikers do.

This fall I am trying the Micropur tablets for the first time, I have always used the liquid, but that just about forces you to take the whole bottle.

The tablets are lighter.

10:33 a.m. on September 21, 2010 (EDT)
21 reviewer rep
148 forum posts

Yes Trout, lighter but at what cost? Again a big issue with a long distance hiker. THe liquid is much less expensive. And it is easily meted out into smaller eye dropper like containers.

1:50 p.m. on September 21, 2010 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
67 forum posts

Filters are your best bet and if properly used you will not get a water-borne illness even though someone mentioned that most of the people he saw with intestinal issues were using filters. I have to disagree with that statement and say that's probably more of a coincidence and that the likely culprits were food-borne illness or problems to do with poor hygiene/handwashing.

We carry a Katadyn filter that filters 2 micron or something like that. I forget the exact specs. We also carry Pristine drops as an emergency backup. Our third backup... boiling. We chose the Katadyn because it was a lighter version of what my friend who works in Africa for the Red Cross was using overseas.

I see no need to use both the filter and Pristine simultaneously as we don't have the viral water issues that you would find in the Eastern countries such as Nepal, India, and such.

2:23 p.m. on September 25, 2010 (EDT)
MODERATOR TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
884 reviewer rep
3,432 forum posts

Yes Trout, lighter but at what cost? Again a big issue with a long distance hiker. THe liquid is much less expensive. And it is easily meted out into smaller eye dropper like containers.

Yes you are right Brad,

I have not gone to the trouble to divide up the liquid; I should have said that most people I know carry the whole bottle of liquid.

It is true that thru hikers go to extra lengths to be efficient with both weight and expense.

7:14 p.m. on September 26, 2010 (EDT)
REVIEW CORPS
1,040 reviewer rep
1,006 forum posts

I carry a First Need XL filter on all but the most volume-conscious hikes. The way I figure it, the filter weighs less, is less dense, and is smaller in volume, than the half-liter or liter of water I'm otherwise waiting to drink (if using iodine/ chlorine dioxide). As long as I can find water at regular intervals, I like the hassle-free nature of the First Need over the purify-and-wait methods. Sure, I'm forced to sleep with the filter--inside a plastic zip-lock--sometimes, but the pure-tasting water it effortlessly produces is worth it 95% of the time.

2:00 p.m. on September 27, 2010 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
50 forum posts
I'm with LaurieAnn!

I also carry the Katadyn filter "Pocket". Yes, heavy . . . but like to finish a trip, not cut short with "the runs" from under-filtered water. If good enough for the American & International Red Cross, good enough for me.


BUT . . . .


I also use my Steripen Opti on day-hikes, if I think the water supply is plentiful, and I'm doing a 18-25 mi day fast-pack.


The Steripen is carried with a spare set of batteries. I use two full-sized Nag bottles, a Steripen pre-filter. Use liquid Hammer Nutrition Sustained Engery & Hammer Gel (Montana Huckleberry & Raspberry). 2-capsules of Electrolytes.

4:35 p.m. on September 27, 2010 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
11 forum posts

Hey Guys, I've not racked up thousands of miles like some of you guys but I have racked up hundreds and I have used a SteriPen for all thouse miles. I can honestly say I am very happy with the results. I have kind of a funky stomach and I have never had any issues. Like previously stated I believe that keeping ones hands as clean as possible when preparing food really helps and just using common sense still has a place on the trails. So, pick your pleasure, plan carefully, and act wisely.

11:49 p.m. on November 22, 2010 (EST)
27 reviewer rep
25 forum posts

I use the MSR miniworks EX filter. MSR brand equipment has been right every time for me.  This water filter pump is very easy to use even for a first timer.  It is easy to clean and continue using  without leaving the water hole.  The pump is bigger and heavier than a bottle of tablets, but it makes a superior product in a fraction of the time.

I  have been to places like the bottom of Grand Canyon, Mt Whitney, Mt Rainier, Buckskin Gulch, Zion Narrows, several fifty milers, backcountry skiing, and always taken at least one MSR filter pump.  Even under a snow field there is running water  somewhere.  It is so much faster to pump a little water than to stop and melt snow.

When packing for a hike/ trip, I consider how much space this item will take, how heavy is it, and how many times will I use it? 

I have tried other brands and styles of pumps that wore me out or clogged up before I filled one water bottle.  I have used bad tasting tablets and added drink powder after the waiting period was over.  What a pain in the neck to wait for the tablets when you're thirsty.

I buy a new filter every year at a local outfitter who has a half price sale on Thanksgiving weekend.

10:42 a.m. on November 24, 2010 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
148 forum posts

I recently purchased a First Need XL and will be taking it out Thursday on a 3 niter.  Since night temps will be around 20 degrees F ( -6 C. ) I will carry a 40 hour Uniheat shipping warmer inside the pouch with the purifier so it doesn't freeze. 

 

2:25 p.m. on December 9, 2010 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
39 forum posts

However some thruhikers feel about the weight of a filter with all due respect and IMHO you're less than smart if you use tablets or other chemicals for more than a day or two. Like has already been mentioned by Rambler I have some stuff in my med kit for emergencies, but not wanting to work my organs so badly on a daily basis I filter just about every time.

I've never heard anything bad about Steripens. My filter just has a long life ahead of it yet.

8:16 p.m. on December 9, 2010 (EST)
MODERATOR TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
884 reviewer rep
3,432 forum posts

However some thruhikers feel about the weight of a filter with all due respect and IMHO you're less than smart if you use tablets or other chemicals for more than a day or two. Like has already been mentioned by Rambler I have some stuff in my med kit for emergencies, but not wanting to work my organs so badly on a daily basis I filter just about every time.

I've never heard anything bad about Steripens. My filter just has a long life ahead of it yet.

Which tablets / chemicals are you worried about?

9:33 a.m. on December 10, 2010 (EST)
26 reviewer rep
56 forum posts

Just want to see what everyone thinks on the subject of Filtering water (pump) vs. Purification (tablets).

I am making a list of gear that I hope to buy before January 2011 and am stuck on what to get for cleaning water.

 

 Before you consider any of these recommendations (as they are all good in their own regard) please tell me what you are going to need it for.

a/ Are you planning an epic backcountry trip in Europe or elsewhere?

b/ Will you be doing multi-day trips in your local area (where is that)?

c/ Perhaps you are a day-tripper right now and can't see yourself doing an overnighters!?

d/ Maybe you are a multi-day tripper but 'car-camp' and use a designated camp spot the entire time as your base camp!

There are a tonne of different scenarios you may be embark on.  As you appear to be a newbie, ( I am assuming cause you are still making a list of gear you need), I find it is very important to build your gear up as time goes on.  In due time, you will start to realize what YOUR specific needs are and fill them.

I find people have great intentions on this forum.  However, everyone is naturally quick to suggest that you use what they bought for themselves or make suggestions without knowing YOUR criterion. 

Just for example, nobody has suggested the oldest/most trusted form of purification!  Read on...

Let me explain, if you are planning on winter camping (hence the January deadline for your gear list) you may NOT NEED A FILTERING WATER PUMP OR PURIFICATION TABLETS.  I never use either.  Regardless of what you use sometimes water will freeze if it isn't insulated properly and make it undrinkable until it is thawed out.  In which case, brings me to the same point.  Not to mention your pump freezing on you...(I learned that lesson years ago.  It was kinda funny that we had two filters amongst us and both froze, became unworkable the first day of our three day trip.)  Now, when we winter camp we never take a filter or tablets we start out with our bladders/bottles full (from home) and then melt snow if we need additional water.  We carry a stove anyways so why not use it in place of a pump or tablets?  It's THE LIGHTEST way to do it hands down!  If you don't plan on getting a stove then chances are you wont need food or water for more than a day anyways and a filter or tablets would be rendered useless...  See what I am saying?  However, that is just one example based on assumed specific criterion and hence why it is important to know YOUR criterion before jumping into suggestions! 

I could go on, however give me some basics about what your intentions are and where you are located.  IMO, this is the only way to get the proper advice you seek =)

Lemeno and we'll go from there.

Reedr

9:41 a.m. on December 10, 2010 (EST)
26 reviewer rep
56 forum posts

I use the Katahdyn Hiker Pro. I clean the filter regularly with regular to heavy use. It packs small and is easy to use. Ive never had any sickness problems with it and I have used it for months at a time. It will freeze up in very cold winter conditions on long hikes if you dont layer it with something in your pack. Overall...Im happy with it. I would use purification tablets for short hikes but I just dont feel comfortable ingesting them for multi week/month hiking. Thats not based on whats in the tablets..its just my personal preference.

 "It will freeze up in very cold winter conditions on long hikes if you dont layer it with something in your pack."

My point exactly...lemeno your criterion before taking any suggestions and running with them. 

just my $.02 worth

Reedr

p.s. sorry bout the double post

5:23 p.m. on December 10, 2010 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1 forum posts

What would y'all suggest if you did not know where you were going to land as in an earthrounder flight across ocean, dessert, mountains, etc., that would seem to fit most situations?  (Weight is an issue versus food, fuel, etc.)

5:44 p.m. on December 10, 2010 (EST)
314 reviewer rep
1,124 forum posts

IMO I would rather play it safe if going all over the globe. It is safety first. Weight second. Filter, pills. boil. If you get sick it would ruin the whole trip. Why take chanches?

6:26 p.m. on December 10, 2010 (EST)
26 reviewer rep
56 forum posts

What would y'all suggest if you did not know where you were going to land as in an earthrounder flight across ocean, dessert, mountains, etc., that would seem to fit most situations?  (Weight is an issue versus food, fuel, etc.)

 Welcome, are you part of any other forums...just curious as to how you happened upon this thread (out of the blue).

mikemorrow is right on based on your wild senario

1.filter

2.drops

3.boil

Note: `...combine boiling with a chemical disinfection method; the boiling is more thorough, but the chemical method will continue to keep the water safe when it's stored.

=)

5:07 a.m. on December 12, 2010 (EST)
87 reviewer rep
2,221 forum posts

However some thruhikers feel about the weight of a filter with all due respect and IMHO you're less than smart if you use tablets or other chemicals for more than a day or two. Like has already been mentioned by Rambler I have some stuff in my med kit for emergencies, but not wanting to work my organs so badly on a daily basis I filter just about every time.

I've never heard anything bad about Steripens. My filter just has a long life ahead of it yet.

Not all chem. Treatment methods are harmful, for example city tap water is chem. treated for most of the US population.  Chem treatments fall into two broad categories: those known as emergency treatment kits, and those known as potable water treatment kits.  The emergency treatment kits taint the water with residual chemicals, and are considered a last resort to ingesting questionable water.  Potable treatment systems are usually two parts one being the solution that sterilizes the water, and the other generally is an oxidizer that precipitates the sterilizer out of solution, removing it from the water in the form of a gas.  Some potable kits take hours to process, but kits sold in the nautical industry can work almost instantaneously, with any delay determined by how long it takes for the sterilizer to permeate suspended particulates in the water.

I use a potable kit domestically where it is warranted.  I say warranted because contrary to popular belief most backcountry waer out west is fit to drink without any processing.  For instance I have hiked all over the Sierras and Cascades during the past forty years, and have used water treatment only in areas with frequent equestrian traffic, or intensive human usage.  Perhaps it is a different situation in the east or south, but I think the bugs in the water thing is a scare tactic out west to get people to buy this merchandise.  JMO.

Ed

9:06 a.m. on December 12, 2010 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
39 forum posts

Trout Hunter, Whomeworry,

I am not afraid of any particular treatment, just don't want to put stuff in my body when I do not want to. And treatment can take a long time.

I have never hat to add chemical treatment to my water in Greater Yellowstone, but although horses aren't a big issue for us the hundreds of thousands of ungulates in this greatest mammalian habitat/by-way of the Earth's Temperate Zone give me pause. Giardia is apparently our only problem and the only time I do not filter is if it is coming right out of ice or snow on a ridge crest and falling rapidly. I will filter lake water however radiated it has been.

10:56 a.m. on December 12, 2010 (EST)
MODERATOR TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
884 reviewer rep
3,432 forum posts

Krumholz Kid said:

"I am not afraid of any particular treatment, just don't want to put stuff in my body when I do not want to. And treatment can take a long time."

 

I understand, I was just interested in your perspective. I only have experience in the Southern Appalachian Mountains and it is much different here. We do not have large expanses of wilderness without development. Our wilderness areas are heavily forested, with little towns, and larger cities dispersed throughout.

We also have agricultural and coal mine run-off to contend with.

What I generally do is filter first, then treat chemically, or boil if in a hurry and my fuel supply allows. By filtering first I get rid of sediment, Giardia, and Cryptosporidium. That reduces my chemical treatment time to less than an hour. If I'm base camping I often treat a large batch of water at one time because it's easier for me that way.

I have not yet used a gravity filter, but I plan to get one soon and try it out.

1:04 p.m. on December 12, 2010 (EST)
72 reviewer rep
1,045 forum posts

Krumholz Kid said:

"I am not afraid of any particular treatment, just don't want to put stuff in my body when I do not want to. And treatment can take a long time."

 

I understand, I was just interested in your perspective. I only have experience in the Southern Appalachian Mountains and it is much different here. We do not have large expanses of wilderness without development. Our wilderness areas are heavily forested, with little towns, and larger cities dispersed throughout.

We also have agricultural and coal mine run-off to contend with.

What I generally do is filter first, then treat chemically, or boil if in a hurry and my fuel supply allows. By filtering first I get rid of sediment, Giardia, and Cryptosporidium. That reduces my chemical treatment time to less than an hour. If I'm base camping I often treat a large batch of water at one time because it's easier for me that way.

I have not yet used a gravity filter, but I plan to get one soon and try it out.

Trouthunter I refitted my camelback and just bought the filter cartridge and bought a less expensive 100 lt bag to put the contaminated water in and filtered it that way, way cheaper and I needed less weight. But it works well. I think you would like it. I wanted to know what you thought of the pure water cleaner tabs? thanks

1:49 p.m. on December 12, 2010 (EST)
MODERATOR TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
884 reviewer rep
3,432 forum posts

Yes that's definitely something I should consider, I know many people make their own gravity filter.

Do you mean the cleaner tabs for cleaning Camelback bladders & water bottles?

If so, I don't have anything against them except cost, I've used them and they work fine. My preference for cleaning & disinfection of my bladders, water bottles, etc is to just use a solution of household  laundry bleach & water. It is cheap, highly effective, and I can clean everything at one time, including flushing out my Katadyn water filter.

 

 

 

7:51 p.m. on December 12, 2010 (EST)
72 reviewer rep
1,045 forum posts

Thats good to know Trouthunter.that will save me money in the long run. I was meaning pure has water tablets for purification now.Was wondering If you knew anything about them or used them. But thanks on the cleaning solution. Alot cheaper. Also whats the weather like in your neck during March? Thanks a bunch

4:51 p.m. on December 14, 2010 (EST)
87 reviewer rep
2,221 forum posts

..I.. ..just don't want to put stuff in my body....

Do note two part purification systems oxidize the chemical solutions utilized out of solution, ostensibly leaving no trace behind.  For example treatment systems utilizing chlorine as the sterilizer use hydrogen peroxide to remove the chlorine, converting the two components into gases that bubble out of the water.  These are much like the approaches many municipalities use as part of their water treatment methodologies. 

Ed       

5:12 p.m. on December 14, 2010 (EST)
72 reviewer rep
1,045 forum posts

..I.. ..just don't want to put stuff in my body....

Do note two part purification systems oxidize the chemical solutions utilized out of solution, ostensibly leaving no trace behind.  For example treatment systems utilizing chlorine as the sterilizer use hydrogen peroxide to remove the chlorine, converting the two components into gases that bubble out of the water.  These are much like the approaches many municipalities use as part of their water treatment methodologies. 

Ed       

 Thank you you just answered what I was trying to understand about how the chemicals useing two parts worked. thanx

4:19 p.m. on December 28, 2010 (EST)
3 reviewer rep
3 forum posts

Quick question, how do you know if the cartridge for the Hiker Pro has frozen and cracked?  I ended up with digestive issues following one trip and upon removing the cartridge from the housing, I found the pleated paper filter to be nearly completely brown.  Any correlation, or were the post-trip squirts merely coincidence?  Thanks!

Matt

6:42 p.m. on December 28, 2010 (EST)
87 reviewer rep
2,221 forum posts

Quick question, how do you know if the cartridge for the Hiker Pro has frozen and cracked?  I ended up with digestive issues following one trip and upon removing the cartridge from the housing, I found the pleated paper filter to be nearly completely brown.  Any correlation, or were the post-trip squirts merely coincidence?  Thanks!

Matt

Note: most gut ailments are the result of inadequate personal hygiene.  So even if one had a broken filtration system the wise money bets improper hand or dish washing was the root cause of the ailment.  Thus any conversation about potable water issues should also advise you make equally certain anyone cooking or handling your food washes their hands first, and that you likewise wash your hands on a regular basis throughout the day, but particularly before you handle food and cooking utensils.

Ed

4:16 p.m. on March 17, 2011 (EDT)
245 reviewer rep
1,469 forum posts

Just want to see what everyone thinks on the subject of Filtering water (pump) vs. Purification (tablets).

I am making a list of gear that I hope to buy before January 2011 and am stuck on what to get for cleaning water.

SteriPEN Adventurer Opti Water Purifier

and

SteriPEN FitsAll Filter

This is what I use as it is small, light, durable and does the job with out adding chemicals to the water to treat it.

11:30 p.m. on March 22, 2011 (EDT)
126 reviewer rep
18 forum posts

Some really great advice here.  One of the most important pieces of advice is to consider the situation when selecting and using any outdoor gear.  I will add a couple of notes from my personal experience.  Like many here I have had good experiences with the First Need filter.

Many of the glacier fed rivers in Alaska contain so much suspended silt that they will upset a sensetive stomach if that silt is not removed.  An easy way to remove that silt without clogging a purification filter is to pre-filter with a coffee filter in a funnel.  This will remove much of that silt and extend the life of the purification water filter such as the First Need or MSR.  If there is much turbidity that passes through the coffee filter and there is some extra time you can let that particulate matter settle overnight before running it through the First Need.

April 18, 2014
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: places to backpack in california with fishing Newer: Taking gear on a plane
All forums: Older: For Sale:Vintage Black & Edgington 'Alaskan' 2-person Newer: Backcountry Banff