water scoop

10:34 p.m. on July 17, 2011 (EDT)
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So I am the brand new owner of a SteriPen! And to me, I feel as if the the filter that is removable from the 2 part prefilter (the one that comes with it originally, that only fits large-mouth nalgene like bottles) doesn't fit snug and could easily be popped off while submerged!

So as a child of the digital technology era, I turned to YouTube!

I found this video,(it's at ~46sec (you don't need to watch, but the guy is funny in that quirky way!)) which was not very relevant to the included prefilter! but it did give me a great idea, that I'm sure has been around forever and shows I still have waaaaaaay too much to learn, for such a simple concept!

So! when all you have for a water source is a small puddle, the guy from youtube said he used a cut off water bottle base for a scoop (this is about when angels started singing the Hallelujah chorus!)

So those of you who have known about this trick, what do you use for your scoop?

I would like to use something other than the other nalgene I carry in order to fill both up to the liter mark. Anyone know of a certain bottle bottom that fits right around a Nalgene... that may be convenient?

side question:

has anybody had a problem with the original prefilter filter popping off?

Thanks in advance yall!

-MikeyBob

9:55 a.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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A 1L soda bottle may do the trick. I have now retired my steripen due to failures encountered on the trail. If I cant trust my gear to perform it will stay at home.

I never used the prefilter, i used a bandana which worked fine for me.

10:54 a.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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MikeyBob

I have used the SteriPen for many years and have never had a problem with the SteriPen or the prefilter assembly. My prefilter fits very snug and takes quite a bit of effort to twist it in place. All the other ones I have seen are the same way. Perhaps you have a defective one.

Whenever I failed to bring my prefilter I used a bandana as TheRambler mentioned, I would triple fold it and drape it around the bottle.

I would suggest however that you carry more than one purification/filtering system because you never know what can happen. I carry my SteriPen, a Bota of Boulder water bottle with a filter in it, and as a last resort chlorine tablets.

10:58 a.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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For a scoop you might try these collapsible measuring cups. Usually just a couple bucks at a dollar store.They weigh next to nothing.


scoop.jpg

11:34 a.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I lost the prefilter once on a hike ( watched it zip away on a fast moving stream) but it was my fault not the filters. After filling the bottle with the filter in place, I removed it to insert the Steri pen. Thats when I fumbled it. For the rest of the trip I used a bandana for a pre filter.

Since I started using the Steri pen I have not had to deal with a water source that I could not drop my bottle into, but in that situation I think I would go with a coffee mug or something like the above mentioned measuring cups. I am not going to carry something specifically for that eventuality, but I am sure that I could figure it out with what I had.

BTW, even though my pen has worked well and given me no problems, I still tuck some water pure tablets down in my first aid kit just in case. 

11:52 a.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I just use my cup, I've only had to do that on a few trips . I use a metal cup that can be washed and heat sterilized very easily while I'm already cooking or heating water.

I personally would not carry something just to dip water with, but I also make sure that my cooking gear contains things that can also be used for such needs. I always carry my metal cup and at least one metal water bottle.

You want an integrated approach to these problems, your gear needs to be multi-purpose and that will cut down on your weight and number of items carried.

12:34 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I always carry Aquamira as a backup. For the added security it provides it is well worth it. I do not use a steri-pen but for prefiltering I have found coffee filters to work very well. If ya lose one who cares.

1:40 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Thank yall for the responses!

Being raised by a doctor and nurse, I have come to fear germs! It used to be pretty bad when I was younger, if I even felt like my hands were dirty, I'd constantly wipe my hands off on my pants until I could get to soap and water!

So I was curious, will a wipe of a handkerchief really take care of contaminants around the lid of a cup, granted that it is dry?

Does beaver fever die when the handkerchief, or the inside of a mug like trouthunter used to scoop, has completely dried?

trouthunter, you said,

"I always carry my metal cup and at least one metal water bottle."

I under stand the metal cup for warm drinks and what not.. but I'm just curious of your set up, is the metal water bottle a back up? cause i've seen things online to always bring an extra metal one just in case...

Steven, thanks for the tip! It always feels like when things are going well, BAM! I learned I forgot to change the batteries...

2:30 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Yes, all waterborn bacteria and pathogens will die when exposed to uv light and completely dry out. The type of bacteria that are waterborn arn't like salmonella/ecoli, you can wash your body/face etc with your bandanna that was used in contaminated water and be just fine. Your pot will also be fine when it is dry, or the next time you boil water in it.

If your really paranoid then just lay your bandanna out in the sun during rest stops. UV light kills them, just like your steripen. Completely dry + a little sunlight for good measure=perfectly safe

Metal single wall bottles can be used to boil water in if the need arises, that is typically why people bring one.

 

 

2:32 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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MikeyBob365 said:

trouthunter, you said,

"I always carry my metal cup and at least one metal water bottle."

I under stand the metal cup for warm drinks and what not.. but I'm just curious of your set up, is the metal water bottle a back up? cause i've seen things online to always bring an extra metal one just in case...

I use a metal cup / mug for drinks, eating soups or stews, or sometimes making noodles or rice, etc. The reason I use metal is because the mug is not only a drinking cup, but also does double duty as a small cooking pot and works well on an alcohol stove, gas stove, or a small fire.

Of course you can sterilize a plastic cup by various means but I prefer metal because it can be used on a stove & sterilized that way as well.

 I don't have to wonder if the Dr. Bronners soap got rid of all the germs / viruses or whatever, (or if it has been exposed to the air or UV long enough). I just place the cup on my stove or small fire (with a little water or enough to make tea) and it will be sterile, no guessing about cleanliness or cross contamination like you can get by putting clean (treated or filtered) water into a dirty container although fresh chemical treated water usually has some residual effect on a container.

I also carry two or three water bottles, two are plastic or Nalgene, but at least one is metal.

I use a metal water bottle for many of the same reasons I use a metal cup. The metal water bottle is also part of my 10 Essentials Kit. If I go hiking away from camp without my backpack I carry a minimal kit which contains emergency items, extra food, compass etc. The metal water bottle is part of this kit and is used as a water bottle for drinking water while hiking, but also as a way to sterilize drinking water over a fire in an emergency.

This way I have a lot of milti-purpose use, and redundancy built into my backpacking gear choices. This is just my own approach and certainly not the only way to do things.

You may enjoy reading The 10 Essentials or Backcountry Water Treatment Parts 1-4

Both very important reads for any backcountry traveler.

2:37 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Thank you Rambler for putting my paranoia to rest!!

and thanks trouthunter for tips and tricks!

3:07 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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For prefilter of water I use a bandana or coffee filter.  To scoop small amounts of water out of "puddles" I use a collapsible dog watering bowl or my new stainless metal water bottle.  I've just gone from using old style heavy glass bottles with Lock tops to 304 stainless bottles.

1:34 p.m. on July 21, 2011 (EDT)
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I use the SteriPen Adventurer Opti and the SteriPen Fits All Filter with filtering and sterilizing water in a Nalgenen 32oz Ultralite Wide Mouth w/ ATB Closure.  I do not use the thinner part of the funnel (leave it at home) and find that the little white Filter with the pop cap to relieve the escaping air fits the Nalgene very well and the little white filter part fits the green fill part of the funnel very well.  Then a quick flash with the SteriPen AO and I am drunk on water.

9:20 p.m. on July 21, 2011 (EDT)
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We live in a world of germs, they are a part of our everyday lives. Many of the bacteria we specifically guard against in hospitals such as the Oxycillin and Methacillin resistant staph. Aurus are no real threat to persons in good health and are not immune-compromised (or very young children). E. Coli lives in the gut and Clostridium Deficil can usually be handled by an intact immune system. Having said that, clean habits when hiking and a healthy respect for what could be ingested should cause us all to take precautions. Any person that  double and triple filters their water after sterilizing their bottles and cups is of course being prudent. I would never criticize that. Someone who is less careful may never have a problem but they should at least be aware of the risk they are taking.  When I started hiking in the early seventies, we never filtered the water we collected and had no problems. Looking back I know that I was lucky. One final note, the germs that might contaminate your water could be coming from you. I always bring hand sanitizer (alcohol based) and use it before (and after) any trail ritual such as water collecting or calls of nature. When I collect water I do not create a sterile field (sarcasm) but I follow the same steps and try not to vary them.

9:00 p.m. on July 22, 2011 (EDT)
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Hafford Said:

"I always bring hand sanitizer (alcohol based) and use it before (and after) any trail ritual such as water collecting or calls of nature."

Absolutely......Your hands may well be the dirtiest part of your body during / after a hike (dirt, fungus, bird poop, poison ivy, etc.) and I always wash my hands before heeding the call of nature, filtering water, doctoring scratches, or whatever.

I'm not scared of being dirty, but according to what I read poor personal hygiene can make you sick just as easy as drinking bad water can, as Hafford notes in his post.

9:56 p.m. on July 22, 2011 (EDT)
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Oh, yes! I bring along handsanitizer - enough for my fellow hikers to use, cause nothing makes me more mad, then someone putting their hands in the trail mix! Not to mention many don't share the same sanitary concerns as my self and regularly don't wash their hands after a whizz to begin with! So i always have some sanitier prepared!

My dad said he's gonna bring me home some of the hand sanitized they have at work.. It's strong enough to kill bird flu and swine flu! I know there isn't much of a risk, but needless to say I'm stoked!

September 30, 2014
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