Mors Pot

8:03 p.m. on January 11, 2012 (EST)
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I am considering getting a Mors Pot and was wondering if anyone here had one that could comment on them. It's an 8 cup hard anodized alluminum pot, with a 3(5) position bail handle, as well as butterfly handles, pour spout, lid. It's 5.75in wide, 5.75-6in tall(6in at center of lid), weight 11.5oz, made in USA.

It has all of the features i like in a pot, and is a easy to take price tag as well($29).

I like to do some real cooking on the trail, especially things like stews and chilis etc. So a larger pot is nice for that. I have some smaller Ti mugs/pots and they are great for just boiling but not so great for cooking.

I am gaining about 5 ounces by going with this pot but think It will be worth it. I wish more pots had a bail and butteryfly handles. I like to cook on a fire alot of the year, and having a bail is very nice.

Anyways, thoughts?

10:43 a.m. on January 12, 2012 (EST)
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The general design fits your intentions, but do note the butterflies often get too hot to handle with bare hands.  Bring along a hooked section of metal coat hanger to hoist the pot by the butterflies when pouring pot contents.  For what it is worth I find pots that are at least as wide as they are high heat more efficiently, but when they are wider than high they with heat faster still, but cool quicker too.

If you can find a similar product with a pour spout formed into the lip you'll be in wilderness cooking heaven!

Ed

9:17 a.m. on January 13, 2012 (EST)
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Ed, what did you mean by find a similar product with a pour spot, this does have a pour spout.

Here is a link to the pot i am looking at

http://www.bensbackwoods.com/servlet/Detail?no=686

5:18 p.m. on January 13, 2012 (EST)
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Sorry for the confusion.  I googled your pot before I replied; the image I viewed was from the butterfly handle side and did not reveal the spout.  Go for it!

Ed

5:42 p.m. on January 13, 2012 (EST)
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That is pretty nice. I'm with Ed. Go for it!

7:03 a.m. on January 14, 2012 (EST)
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Ok so I ordered the pot and I recieved it yesterday.(that was some fast shipping, i only ordered it on Wed).

I like it. Initial impressions are it is solidly built and looks like it will hold up to some good hard use. Handles are pretty stiff and stay in position, the locking bail handle is NICE!. It's only a notch that catches the bail, so there is nothing special you have to do to release it other than move the handle. But, it will be nice when cooking on a fire, because you can position it to be largely away from the hottest part of the fire. You can lock it straight up, or 90 deg left or right. The lid fits nice and tight, and the lid also has a notch in the D ring and when you have it laying to the right it is flat, but when you have it to the left it is raised up and gives room to get a stick etc in there to lift the lid off. and on the bottom of the pot is is stamped MADE  IN USA. I think I will be very happy with the Mors pot

Can't wait to get it out in the field here in a few weeks. Will be able to give it a good work out on my feb 3-10th trip.

8:14 p.m. on January 14, 2012 (EST)
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Dang....now you have me wanting one.

I have an old MSR Alpine set (stainless) that I take if I plan on cooking much on a fire, my only complaint is that it does not have a bail handle, it came with an MSR pot gripper which is okay for cooking on a stove.

Let us know how it cooks!

9:15 p.m. on January 14, 2012 (EST)
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Trouthunter, this is replacing my msr alpine stainless steel pot as well. Will definitely be posting a review after my feb trip.

1:24 p.m. on January 20, 2012 (EST)
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When I got started in this, I considered options. From that, I am experimenting with Freezerbag Cooking and purchased a Jetboil. Are there advantages to this, carrying pots and stoves and such, that I did not factor in? There are some recipes in the freezer bag cooking that would call for a separate pot but for the vast majority, I seem to be doing well with the Jetboil and freezer bags......so are there advantages to this form of cooking over that?  I looked at the pot also from your link and a few others....it seems like a great item at a light weight, to have in the pack or, even hanging from it. 

7:48 a.m. on January 21, 2012 (EST)
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@Braveheart

I also do a fair amount of FBC. I dehydrate my own meals. I however also like to cook fresh food often as well. If you are ONLY boiling water for a hot drink or a FBC meal then you do not 'need' a large pot.

However, if you plan to do backpacking in the snow a large pot is very useful for melting snow for water. It takes alot of snow to make adequate amounts of water, it would just take longer with a smaller mug/pot.

A larger pot can also make steam baking a more viable option.

I like to cook over a fire when possible to save on having to carry as much fuel, and for that a bail handle on a pot proves very useful. In the end it really comes down to personal preference vs your needs. I have a small Ti mug that I bring when just wanting to boil a small amount of water. When just boiling i use a small alcohol stove, or a canister stove.

The jetboil is a good stove system, and if all your wanting to do is FBC or boil water it is an excellent choice. Most of my trips are only 3-4 days in length on average, and this allows me to carry more fresh foods. So when possible i prefer to cook fresh, i just love to cook. It also makes a handy foraging container(having a bail handle makes this an easier to carry container), its also ample size to use to fetch water from a water source to bring back to camp. 

So in a nutshell just compare your needs to any pot or stove system you are considering, and if it meets all your needs then it should work fine for you. Consider things like if your going to be boiling water for several people, what kind of meals do you want to make, if you will be melting snow, will you be cooking on a stove or open fire, among other things i am sure i forgot

 

 

11:21 a.m. on January 24, 2012 (EST)
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Can't wait for the gear report Rambler!  Don't be afraid to post your initial use report.  You can always add to it when you get more hours of use.

5:55 p.m. on January 25, 2012 (EST)
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I will be putting up a review after I return from my trip feb 3-10th. Plan on giving it a good work out.

8:55 a.m. on January 28, 2012 (EST)
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I made some blueberry muffins this morning in the Mors pot with my msr xgk ex stove. The mors pot holds 3 silly feet comfortably, though i ate one before I thought about taking a pic. Let it steam for 15 minutes, and then sit with the stove off for 5 mins. Came out perfect.



IMG_1093.jpg

 

 

2:26 p.m. on January 28, 2012 (EST)
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NIce pot

4:32 p.m. on February 1, 2012 (EST)
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Rambler: Those are great looking muffins!  What mix are you using?

6:33 p.m. on February 1, 2012 (EST)
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Nice....what are your coords? haha

8:06 a.m. on February 2, 2012 (EST)
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it's just Betty Crocker just add water mixes. very simple, I just mix them in a ziplock and cut off the corner and squeeze into the cups

4:05 p.m. on February 3, 2012 (EST)
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Great, thanks!

4:22 p.m. on February 11, 2012 (EST)
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7:33 p.m. on February 11, 2012 (EST)
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I already read it just a few minutes ago, very well done.

I'm glad you like it so much, I am leaning strongly towards getting one myself for when I go to areas where I can do some primitive cooking.

2:45 a.m. on April 7, 2012 (EDT)
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Rambler said:  "I also do a fair amount of FBC. I dehydrate my own meals. I however also like to cook fresh food often as well."

I have been toying with the idea of dehydration but there are so many products that pop up in a search!  Would you mind sharing what the process is that you use?  As far as the "fresh food," how do you manage its freshness?

I appreciate the idea of "good" cooking on the trail--it reinforces the joy (over some of the agonies) of being out there!  Thanks ahead of time.

5:41 p.m. on April 8, 2012 (EDT)
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The Rambler said

"Here is a link to the pot i am looking at

http://www.bensbackwoods.com/servlet/Detail?no=686"

Thanks for the excellent review, Rambler, and I look forward to getting my pot from Ben's.  I like the way annodizing (sp?) seals the metal and makes it kind of "naturally" stick-resistant.  I especially enjoyed the way Ben's treats new customers and the quotes he puts at the end of his messages/order forms (a different and backwoods-relevant one each time).

 

5:52 p.m. on April 8, 2012 (EDT)
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The Rambler said

"Here is a link to the pot i am looking at:

Reminds me of the old Hobo Billy Pot. We (in BSA) used to make them from a ex-soup can with a bail attached and a lid made from a second can cut low and a handle attched to its bottom.

July 24, 2014
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