The New MSR MicroRocket -- Completed Review

12:19 p.m. on January 25, 2012 (EST)
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I've been evaluating the new MSR MicroRocket Stove.  It's pretty nice.


P1090092.JPG

My review is now complete and available:  The New MSR MicroRocket -- Completed Review

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

2:07 p.m. on February 18, 2012 (EST)
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I just weighed both.

If the MicroRocket is less the Piezo Lighter, they weight the same in their storage containers.

PR stove 3oz

MR stove 2-5/8oz ,  lighter 1/2oz

PR cont. 7/8oz

MR cont. 1-1/4oz

PR stove in cont. = 3-7/8oz = MR stove in cont. (w/ lighter = 4-3/8oz)

11:56 p.m. on February 20, 2012 (EST)
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Volume of each container, though different in shape is the same at 200cc each.

I just bought another miniature stove and have now crossed over after examining the flame control and distribution and weight and volume of storage.

Snow Peak LiteMax Stove

wt = (in soft case) 0.148lbs

  MR or PR at 3-7/8oz = 0.242lbs (in case w/o lighter)

size = very small

Flame = smooth and quieter and easier to control and more distributed

9:15 p.m. on February 21, 2012 (EST)
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Hi, Callahan,

I just picked up the Kovea Supalite (Camp 56), which is basically just the LiteMax with another name.  I too am generally impressed with the stove although I haven't had a chance to put it through its paces just yet.

I think the MicroRocket may have a little bit better pot stability though.

The first thing to do with the MicroRocket is to leave the storage container at home.  Just stick the stove in your pot; that's plenty of protection.

HJ 

9:22 p.m. on February 21, 2012 (EST)
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hikin_jim said:

The first thing to do with the MicroRocket is to leave the storage container at home.  Just stick the stove in your pot; that's plenty of protection.

HJ 

Also if you are using coated cookwear make sure to keep the stove in something like a sock with the ankle portion cut off.

This will cut down on it possibly beating up the coating of your cookwear as well as cut down on the "clanging" noise coming from your pack. 

I personally like Crown Royal bags.... Then again maybe I just like Crown Royal. ;)

11:37 a.m. on February 22, 2012 (EST)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

I personally like Crown Royal bags.... Then again maybe I just like Crown Royal. ;)

 Dual use gear!  What's not to like?  ;)

HJ

Adventures In Stoving

11:49 a.m. on February 22, 2012 (EST)
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hikin_jim said:

Dual use gear!  What's not to like?  ;)

HJ

Adventures In Stoving

 Exactly. :)

1:52 p.m. on February 22, 2012 (EST)
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hikin_jim said:

Hi, Callahan,

I just picked up the Kovea Supalite (Camp 56), ..............

I think the MicroRocket may have a little bit better pot stability though.

The first thing to do with the MicroRocket is to leave the storage container at home.  .......................................................

HJ 

Hi JIm,

Yep, stability is a consideration.

The MicroRocket 3 peice pot cradle is every so slightly larger than that of the PocketRocket and LiteMax.  This is one point of stability and another is the diameter of the gas canister.  Oh yeah also the ground you put the thing on.

5:05 p.m. on February 23, 2012 (EST)
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Callahan said:

Yep, stability is a consideration.

The MicroRocket 3 peice pot cradle is every so slightly larger than that of the PocketRocket and LiteMax.  This is one point of stability and another is the diameter of the gas canister.  Oh yeah also the ground you put the thing on.

The radius of the pot supports is important, but also the width, type of material, angle, any serrations, and overall design. 

 

I actually think the Snow Peak GigaPower with it's four serrated wire pot supports is about as good as it gets with a small, lightweight canister stove. 

 

HJ

Adventures In Stoving

5:10 p.m. on February 23, 2012 (EST)
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Stability wise I think the MSR WindPro deserves consideration as well. 

Although the design is typical of a liquid fuel stove its still a canister model.  

11:55 p.m. on February 23, 2012 (EST)
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Oh, yeah, absolutely.  Different class of stove though (remote canister vs. upright canister).  No comparison in the stability department.  The WindPro/WindPro II is WAY more stable.

Incidentally, MSR has discontinued the SimmerLite, the liquid fuel version of the WindPro.

HJ

Adventures In Stoving
 

12:32 a.m. on February 24, 2012 (EST)
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hikin_jim said:

Incidentally, MSR has discontinued the SimmerLite, the liquid fuel version of the WindPro.

HJ

Adventures In Stoving
 

Hmmm, any reason why? I kinda like this model. I was actually playing with mine on the deck last night.

I just read the above contained in the link. I wonder how collectible it will become. I think its safe to assume that there are quite a few out there. 

Will replacement parts still be available such as pumps, rebuild kits, etc?

7:46 a.m. on February 24, 2012 (EST)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Will replacement parts still be available such as pumps, rebuild kits, etc?

Probably for a year or maybe two, but inevitably MSR will stop stocking them.  I'm going to buy another Expedition Maintenance Kit for the Simmerlite while they're still available.

And I'm with you.  I actually like the Simmerlite.  For winter, I think it's a great stove.  It's not only light; it's very packable.  The Simmerlite is the most compact of the MSR liquid fueled stoves.  I'm hanging on to mine.

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

3:08 a.m. on February 25, 2012 (EST)
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I must have it ciovered then as of reading these last few.

1 x MSR Simmerlite

and

1x Snow Peak LiteMax

2:38 p.m. on February 25, 2012 (EST)
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Hj, I've still got the old msr rapid fire remote canister stove, are there still parts available for it? It still works great. Never had a problem with it, but what if I may need parts in the future?

I've also crossed over from the msr pr to the optimus crux (not the lite). It folds to allow the stove to fit under the concave bottom of the canister & all of it drops into my msr Titan kettle. So far it really works great. The flame pattern spreads out much better than the pr & the arms for pot holder are more stable & lower profile than my pr. My only gripe is that for some reason you need to run the flame adjustment pretty high for a while or it will go out. Once it warms up, it will simmer pretty well. So far I really like it. I'm going to give it a good work out before I write a review.

12:45 a.m. on February 26, 2012 (EST)
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Hi, Guyz,

There's not much to go wrong on a RapidFire, but you could call MSR and see what is available.  You might need a new jet or an "O" ring, but that's about it.  A lot of the parts from a pre-shaker jet Whisperlite should work on the RapidFire.  The "O" ring, if not available from MSR is probably a standard size, and you could probably get it from a hydraulics supply or similar store if it were not available from MSR.

I've also got a Crux, and it is the most compact of all the small gas stoves I own.  It's got a nice well distributed flame for even cooking.  To me, it's pot stability isn't as good as a MicroRocket's or a GigaPower's, but it's not horrible either.  I've been pretty happy with my Crux.  I have however seen reports stating that the Crux's carbon monoxide emissions are high, so watch out if you ever use it in an enclosed area.

HJ

Adventures In Stoving

9:14 a.m. on February 26, 2012 (EST)
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Thanks Jim, I'll keep that in mind when cooking. I haven't noticed any excessive fumes yet, but I usually cook in the open any way. Thanks for the info.

1:17 a.m. on February 27, 2012 (EST)
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The problem with carbon monoxide is that there is no way to notice it.  You can't see it, smell it, or taste it.

HJ

 Adventures In Stoving

10:55 p.m. on March 7, 2012 (EST)
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get a sensor

6:05 p.m. on March 8, 2012 (EST)
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For a backpacking trip?  Do they make such a thing?

 

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

 

6:32 p.m. on March 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Callahan said:

get a sensor

 Didn't miners use a canary ?

                             pax vobiscum

                                  ~ r2 ~

11:17 a.m. on March 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Yes, but I don't want to be "cheep."  ;)

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

3:01 p.m. on March 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Nice stove.  I wonder how this would compare to the Monatuk Gnat?  I had one but now use a Jetboil Ti (yes - I have read your concerns over that stove).  I am so tired when I get to camp that I like the ease of use of the Jetboil.

8:53 p.m. on March 17, 2012 (EDT)
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Family Guy said:

Nice stove.  I wonder how this would compare to the Monatuk Gnat? 

The Gnat is lighter and has a more dispersed flame, but the MicroRocket is more compact and has better pot stability.

 

Family Guy said:

 ...now use a Jetboil Ti (yes - I have read your concerns over that stove).  I am so tired when I get to camp that I like the ease of use of the Jetboil.

I really like the aluminum Jetboil Sol, but I haven't made my mind up about the Ti version of the Jetboil Sol.  I'd like to get my hands on one for testing, but my testing might destroy the cup, so I'm not sure anyone is going to provide me with one.

There's nothing wrong at all with the Jetboil, and now that they've really brought the weight down, they're quite competitive with "regular" upright canister stoves.

The obvious advantages of the Jetboil include higher efficiency (more liters boiled per canister), speed, and ease of use.  The danged things are freaking  convenient.  The "hidden" advantage of the Jetboil is that it has some wind resistance whereas a regular upright stove does not.  Wind can eat you alive in terms of fuel efficiency on a regular canister stove.

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

July 24, 2014
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