Home made cozy for a backpacking pot

10:27 p.m. on March 29, 2012 (EDT)
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I wanted to ask the extensive knowledge base here at Trailspace: would just plain aluminum foil work? I want to make a lightweight, easy to use cozy for my pot. It would make eating a whole lot easier. 
Thanks in advance for the info :) 

5:46 a.m. on March 30, 2012 (EDT)
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Try it for yourself, it shouldn't take much effort to test at home.  But I doubt foil covering a hot pot will allow you to handle it, or provide significant insulation to keep it warm.  Corigated card board is a better material in both instances.  But why bother? I bring two of those double walled plastic drinking cups; one for beverages, one for solid food.  My grub and drink is always hot.

Ed

8:46 a.m. on March 30, 2012 (EDT)
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Well, if you are that ambitious purchase a blue foam pad from Wally World, etc and cut a short section off of it(not like ya need it all.)

I am pretty sure aluminum foil would transfer too much heat to your hands. Size it to your requirements then use some type of bonding adhesive to get it to stay together or maybe even stitch it(better yet both.) Just don't make it super tight so ya don't have a failure and you should be good to go.

I'm personally pretty lazy to take on this type of endeavor. Either way good luck on your "cozy crusade" Latitude918.

9:48 a.m. on March 30, 2012 (EDT)
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Wouldn't a mitten or hat do the trick?

10:15 a.m. on March 30, 2012 (EDT)
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Or an old stretched out sock(dependent upon size of pot of course.)

Come to think of it, a headband may work as well. For a smaller sized pot just get a kids sized one... or 2.

12:33 p.m. on March 30, 2012 (EDT)
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I use a Tshirt or a towel or some clothing item to wrap around my cook pot after I take it off the stove. Even a bandana works quite well.

1:11 p.m. on March 30, 2012 (EDT)
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There is a type of thin reflective bubble wrap sold at Home Depot and similar stores called Reflectix.

It’s sorta like a combination of space blanket material and bubble wrap, about 5/16th inch thick and it has an R value of about 3.7

This stuff and a little tape is said to make the very best and lightest pot cozy’s

The only trouble is that it comes in rather big rolls – You’ll have enough to wrap every pot and cup you own!

Not a problem really, as you can probably make good use of it insulating pipes and what-not around the home.

In the Complete Walker IV, Chip Rawlins comments on using this stuff as a sleeping pad. He wrote that it isn’t very durable and unless one is very careful with it you wind up popping  bubbles and reducing its insulating efficiency, however he took to using a sheet of it under his regular pad when sleeping on snow, and that worked out very well and prevented him from melting out his usual-slight body-shaped-hollow in the snow under his tent, for very little extra weight.

9:31 p.m. on March 30, 2012 (EDT)
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As mentioned a sock, jacket, or bandanna can be very useful!

EtdBob is correct about Reflectix too,

Many people make cozies out of Reflectix (like the bubble wrap sun shades for your car) and Duct tape. I have made three and they work extremely well. Most people even make a lid as well. With a lid you can turn a stove off, place your pot into the cozy, cover with the cozy lid and your food will more or less continue to 'cook' without expending any more fuel.

Very lightweight, works excellently, and costs pennies for each one. Great for keeping one pot warm while you cook a second part of a meal.

Reflectix also works in reverse for keeping foods cool or frozen longer as you backpack in.

A wet sock or bandanna wrapped around a metal water bottle will help to cool your drinking water in warmer weather through evaporative cooling if you have a breeze and can place the bottle in the shade. This does work, but don't expect any ice crystals as results will vary depending on the conditions. It does make drink mixes more enjoyable than plain tepid water most times for me.

12:58 p.m. on March 31, 2012 (EDT)
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Many people make cozies out of Reflectix (like the bubble wrap sun shades for your car) and Duct tape. I have made three and they work extremely well. Most people even make a lid as well. With a lid you can turn a stove off, place your pot into the cozy, cover with the cozy lid and your food will more or less continue to 'cook' without expending any more fuel.

I've got a couple of Reflectix type cozies.  They work well.  They really are nice for re-hydrating foods -- and they can save a lot of fuel.  The other plus is that they weigh very little and take up little space if you pack your pot in them.

HJ
Adventures in Stoving

12:14 a.m. on April 1, 2012 (EDT)
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Oh I forgot about that Reflectix stuff even though there's a roll of it in the basement. It's great in the hammock tent although easy to slide on. Hmm maybe I'll cut out a cozy now...

4:56 p.m. on April 1, 2012 (EDT)
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no

5:20 p.m. on April 1, 2012 (EDT)
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Reflectix! Thats the stuff I was thinking of. I saw Shug using it in some of hist trip report videos on his youtube page. I was wondering what it was. I thought it was just aluminum foil. Thanks to all of the constructive responses :) 

5:30 p.m. on April 1, 2012 (EDT)
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A sleeve cut off of an old sweatshirt? I could go on and on with this.

Reflectix would work(oh wait, that was already mentioned.)

7:46 p.m. on April 4, 2012 (EDT)
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It's all about dual purpose when possible. My stocking cap makes a great great cozy.

September 23, 2014
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