Coffee Latest?

4:45 a.m. on April 6, 2012 (EDT)
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Hello

Reading one of the Haikus got me thinking: where are we at with the backcountry coffee technology? I tried SB's Via, even though it is a total shakedown, and was disappointed: tasted like over-roasted fine ground Robusta mixed with instant.

I have tried nearly everything - coffee bags, aeropress, french press, mini-boiler espresso thing, press-bot, mugmate, drip, freeze dried instant, cowboy coffee etc - so I was wondering if anyone knew of something recent or unmentiioned.

The only thing I haven't tried, due to cost and some reviews mentioning leakage, is the GSI thing that strains the top of a Nalgene. But that would just taste like a large mugmate with a plastic finish, surely?

I am looking for lightweight and simplicity. I admit that the Via sachets are a bit better than instant but I would have to go back to shoplifting for more than a few day's supply.

Cheers, Jon

PS: I even tried those instant cappuccino sachets, which tasted like dog shampoo.

PPS: I'm not a coffee snob, I just can't stand what the plebs drink.

5:40 a.m. on April 6, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

There was extensive online discussion here ... about a year ago (?) I reckon.    A couple rather loooong-ish threads.    Do a search.

I probably AM a 'cawfee' (my Nu Yawk accent) snob.

I now add Yerba-Mate and Teeccino to my daily selection for some welcome variety.

Having a strong and robust cup of Yerba-Mate right now, as I am posting this.

Mmmmmm ....   Ahhhhhh ....

                                ~ r2 ~

9:08 a.m. on April 6, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

State of the art for the diehard coffee lover.
2000008430_500.jpg

It's heavy but if you just gotta have that fresh brewed cup.

Coleman 10 cup portable propane coffeemaker with stainless steel carafe

This is an interesting one also.  Runs on esbit.

esbit-stainless-steel-coffee-maker-8-floz

Found this entry in a blog also.

Top 10 backcountry coffee makers

GSI makes a plethora of coffee related stuff.

http://www.gsioutdoors.com/products/cat/coffee/P0/

PS. I am not a coffee drinker.

11:43 a.m. on April 6, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

ocalacomputerguy said:

State of the art for the diehard coffee lover.
2000008430_500.jpg

 No, this is the state of the art system.


coffee.jpg

As for me I use a single cup drip. I know purists claim the filter traps the essential oils, and all that.  But it is good enough in my muddy cup.

Ed

11:51 a.m. on April 6, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

Nice, I will look into all those.

I am drinking one of the Grower's Cup things, brew (500ml) in the bag and very expensive. Slightly better than the quality coffee bag singles but it is just a coarse grind that is brewed longer and the weight of paper and plastic makes it impractical.

I picked up some Nestle and Kenco versions of the micro-grind/instant Via type sachets, just to see (much cheaper as well).

You would think with a man on the moon there would be a coffee extract (s/he could take into outerspace) worth drinking.

12:12 p.m. on April 6, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

Rob, Yerba-mate is new to me. I think I know the Teechino, based on the ingredients. I saw some Camp chicory and coffee syrup in the supermarket, now that would be nostalgic.

I remember that thread. I just can't get the search function to return forum-only results. (I only just discovered the click on latest post thing will take you to the bottom of the page - been scrolling down the long posts like a madman for years.)

Coleman thing looks good for car camping. Esbit solid fuel, haven't used solid fuel in a long time.

GSI h2jo is looking ok if the lid fits. It is half the weight of the more complicated pressbot thing. There are a few foldable drips out there I will likely try, though drip isn't my favourite method.

I better call it a day on the caffeine. Though it is only 5pm. Maybe one more espresso then some loud music.

12:34 p.m. on April 6, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

Whomeworry said

No, this is the state of the art system.


coffee.jpg

Bit flavorless that way isn't it? About the only way I would "drink" it though.  I do like the chocolate covered beans though.  They would make a good substitute.

4:24 p.m. on April 6, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

ocalacomputerguy said:

Whomeworry said

No, this is the state of the art system.


coffee.jpg

Bit flavorless that way isn't it? About the only way I would "drink" it though.  I do like the chocolate covered beans though.  They would make a good substitute.

 "Bit flavorless that way isn't it?"  Yea but gives on quite the instant giddy-up and go..............

9:48 p.m. on April 6, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

I had been using paper cone filters attached to the top of my mug with a rubber band and slowly pouring hot water from another pot to make my own drip brewer.

Last month I bought a metal cone filter (fine mesh sold to replace paper cone filters) at my local kitchen & bath store. I bought it fairly impromptu thinking I would find a way to make it work in the backcountry.

There are other similar ones you can find online made for the outdoors. MSR makes a metal filter for around 17.00 USD and snow peak makes an aluminum holder for paper filters that sits on top of your mug for around 25.00 USD. The one I found that is made for home coffee brewers costs less than 4.00 USD.

It fits fairly well on top of my Snow Peak 900 (900ml) pot, and I have used it on three trips so far.

I like it, it brews coffee faster and easier than paper filters which I had been using.  This also makes it much easier to use paper cone filters for pre-filtering  lake or pond water by using the metal cone as a holder / funnel placed on top of a water container.

The metal cone does take up more space than folded paper filters and I am still working out the best way to pack & store it with my kitchen kit.

Other than the metal cone, there is no other item needed that I don't already carry, and this method doesn't require me to buy a coffee "system" like a press or dedicated filtering mug. I don't like being tied down to systems that require special items or limit functionality.

I like keeping my kitchen kit simple, light, easy, and as reconfigurable as possible while in the field.

This is why I have just been using paper filters held on the top of my mug with a rubber band, but I think the metal cone is probably going to stay in my kit, at least for now.

Mike G.

11:37 p.m. on April 6, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

I like the taste and the heat now more then the Caffeine, I can fall a sleep drinking a cup of coffee.  That what I get for drinking pots of coffee a day and then "Discovering" espresso!  I use to drink that like black coffee. 

Has anyone tried one of those "K" packs< the kind for the single cup makers?  Are they a liquid?  I always thought so, but I have never used one.  That may be a way to make a nice cup of Joe in the morning, just add boiling water and mix.  Of course this would weigh a little more then ground or instant and would need some protection in the food kit, I would probably double zip-lock bag them and then put the trash in the outer bag. Might be an option.

Good luck and let us know if you find anything interesting.

Here are some of the other threads that are on coffee.

Coffee making gear

Bandana Coffee & LNT

Of course then their is the dreaded debate over Coffee vs. Tea!

That should keep you reading for a little while! :)

Wolfman

3:46 a.m. on April 7, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

Thanks for the links, Wolfman. Are the "K" packs the plastic filters that you throw away? Or the bags with paper side holders?

There is a debate over Coffee v. Tea? I would have thought it was like having your cake and eating it - just take more cake.

Trout, I have the same Snowpeak pot, I will look at what you said, cheers.

5:11 a.m. on April 7, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

Do people find that using drip filters on cold mornings results in cold coffee? Just wondering. I've used coffee bags (like tea bags but who knows what is in them really ....) which produce a nice hot cup of something resembling coffee, and enough caffeine to get me going... But wondering about what is the most tolerable instant coffee as I hate having to carry the wet, heavy used bags out.

5:12 a.m. on April 7, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

ta.

11:53 a.m. on April 7, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

It is traditional in the UK to open up the used bags, tea or coffee, and scatter them on the ground. Of course, you have to understand that most of what we 'wild camp' on is a type of livestock food in the form of cheap grass, where nothing else is allowed to grow, so it isn't so bad. A few parts of Scotland (see the John Muir Trust for info) would perhaps qualify as 'wild land' and there the practice may be questionable.

Bill could set the record straight on how such a thing would meet LNT principles.

I too am seeking a freeze dried coffee that tastes like the original liquid. So far, so bad.

PS: tea bags are not biodegradable, as I understand it, being made from synthetics mostly; I assume coffee bags are the same, so carry them out.

Edit: sorry, to be clear, tea bag material and coffee bag material is not biodegradable and even if it was, I would not bury it - it is lightweight. Orange peel and banana skins are biodegradable but there is no reason for us to make the outdoors endure our waste, aesthetically and chemically speaking. (Why do people still throw orange peel all over the place outdoors?) I know you know that, just thought it worth reiterating here. Oh, and the cold drip thing: thermal mug is the only way I know to combat that, short of flashing with boiling water.

3:34 p.m. on April 7, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

Wolfman, I have now read all those posts. Thanks again. I especially liked the person who found do-it-yourself tea/coffee bags.

I guess the GSI coffee H2jo is next then, for me. Here's hoping it fits my nalgenes.

8:21 p.m. on April 7, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

I may be totally wrong about the "K" packs, like I said I have not actually tried them.  But form what I have seen they look like one of the creamer or coffee flavor packs, those little cups that are in the 7-11's and stores like that.  That is always an option to stock up on creamers and the like.  But I know the stores don't like it.  The AM-PM near my shop started charging .25$ for each you did not use in your coffee, I guess some people were taking a bunch for their home.  The nerve of some people!

I will be stopping at the local store later today/night and will try to get some more info on the "K" packs.

In one of those threads I linked to a site someplace back east that you could buy your own coffee or tea bags and make up your own single use packs.  It seemed like a good way if you did not want to take all the extra gear.  I ended up buying a bunch of Viva from Costco, it's not great, but I can deal with it.  I often take herbal tea in the colder months for a nice warmup at night.

Wolfman

10:42 p.m. on April 7, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

Yeah, the GSI H2JO is one of the better solutions I have seen. Works kinda like a press and fits wide mouth Nalgene bottles.

I have looked at the "K" packs myself but I don't know much about them.

I used to get coffee singles like tea bags at several local stores, can't remember the brand, and now I can't find them. They worked really good for brewing on the trail.

Mike G.

2:09 a.m. on April 8, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

Donna said:

Do people find that using drip filters on cold mornings results in cold coffee?

Not a problem for me, even of frosty mornings.  The water is in the brew filter only a minute, not long enough to get cold.  And my cup is a insulated double wall model; keeps heat well.

Ed

2:45 a.m. on April 8, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

Those k pax are filled with coffee grounds. The machine actually pokes two holes into it to make coffee steaming hot water in top drains through grounds and out bottom hole into cup. I don't see them as being very practical on the trail. They produce alot of waste compared to traditional coffee preparation also. On hot days I will just put a couple of those coffee tea bags into my water bottle and hit the trail. A couple hours later you have nice caffeinated cool refreshing coffee drink. OP. You said you weren't a fan of French press coffee. Were you using fine ground or course ground coffee beans. You need to use corse ground with a fresh press to get a good cup o Joe. Fine ground is a little bitter and chalky.

5:09 a.m. on April 8, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

 You said you weren't a fan of French press coffee. Were you using fine ground or course ground coffee beans. You need to use corse ground with a fresh press to get a good cup o Joe.

Yes, at home we have a grinder that does coarse pretty well (it is a low-end Krupps on the max setting). On the road, the general grind sold everywhere is for cafetiere (FP) or filter, and works ok. I do like FP, especially with a good earthy bean, middle roast, where it shines.

It is the weight of the lexan press (and they are not durable) and the weight/complexity of the press bot, that induced me to fish for comments. I thought, having just tried the Via sachets that have been in the US for so long already, that there would be something new on the horizon by now. Via (haven't used the cheaper imitations yet) is just above instant, in my book, which is just below a quality coffee bag.

I know it is anal but with inflatable air beds and fully breathable clothing, I find myself with nothing to do on camping trips these days. The entire operation has been ratcheted up into the bourgeois stratosphere, where you can probably taste the difference in spring water from different sides of the mountain. All the suffering that used to make cowboy coffee taste marvellous outdoors has been replaced by middle-class coffee angst. It's the princess and the bean.

Oh, the shame.

What kind of sun-dried tomato is everyone using?*

*Sarcasm on/off.

7:41 a.m. on April 8, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

I love the ease of coffee bags.

 

after making a cup, I tear the things open and spread the grounds on the ground.

Makes my load a little lighter and also makes compost

12:31 p.m. on April 8, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

h2jo is quick and simple and for me makes a good cup of coffee. Put a cozy on the bottle and it will stay hot. Its basically cowboy coffee. I put the grounds in the bottle and pour out thru the screen. screwing it on the bottle is a pain sometimes, just push down hard while turning.

I use the k-cups at home, ground coffee in a plastic cup. The machine punches 2 holes and forces the hot water thru. Its nice for single servings but is absolutly the most expensive single cup of coffee you can make at home, short of the Civet poop, but does anyone really drink that stuff?.

6:39 p.m. on April 8, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

Thanks for the info on the K coffee, for some reason I always thought that they were a liquid.  And yea they are not cheep. 

Wolfman

12:36 a.m. on April 9, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

I am sort of a coffee snob.  Whether I am back packing at 10,000 feet or car camping with my wife and 2 kids, I like really good coffee.  I roast my own before I leave.  But that is only half of the equation.

When I am car camping, I really enjoy brewing with a Moka Pot.   It's like making coffee in a small pressure cooker.  Call it poor man's espresso.  Whatever.  It sure makes a great cup of joe!


mokapot.jpg

Another method is to use a really fine tea strainer.  These really work fantastic and are light weight.  It brews a cup as good as any French press without fear of breaking the carafe!


meshteastrainer.jpg

12:39 a.m. on April 9, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

What is the brand name of the metal cone filter.  Sounds great!

12:40 a.m. on April 9, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

trouthunter said:

I had been using paper cone filters attached to the top of my mug with a rubber band and slowly pouring hot water from another pot to make my own drip brewer.

Last month I bought a metal cone filter (fine mesh sold to replace paper cone filters) at my local kitchen & bath store. I bought it fairly impromptu thinking I would find a way to make it work in the backcountry.


This is why I have just been using paper filters held on the top of my mug with a rubber band, but I think the metal cone is probably going to stay in my kit, at least for now.

Mike G.

 What is the brand name?

9:21 a.m. on April 9, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

I use a cheap little Bodum travel press. It is light wieght, and makes 16 oz of great coffee. Just set my grider to coarse and go. 


100_0658.jpg
 

9:31 a.m. on April 9, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

A word to / for the "K"-cups, "K"-packs  ("K", for Keurig brand-name) fans, enthusiasts ....

They work out to cost about $60 per lb. for the coffee.

Some very 'well-heeled' coffee aficionados about, methinks.

Please remember me in your wills.

                           

                                     ~ r2 ~

                                  frugal dude

10:48 a.m. on April 9, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

My money goes to any Sherpa, anywhere...but until then, I will bask in expensive coffee goodness! I am a true coffee snob but did find the VIA good on this trek. Fast, no product waste except the pouch to carry out. If it were flammable, that would solve that a swell...but sorta weird plasticy pack.

9:17 p.m. on April 9, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

cool feet said:

What is the brand name of the metal cone filter.  Sounds great!

 Welcome to Trailspace!

I'm trying to remember the brand...it seems like it was an off brand. My wife has a better memory than me, I will ask her.

I'll get back to you ASAP.

Mike G.

11:19 a.m. on April 10, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

Thanks for looking into this matter.  I can remember leaving for camping trips and remembering that I did not pack my coffee brewing equipment.  I have returned home just to get my brewing stuff.  Sure makes me feel like an addict...but a happy addict!

 

Cheers!

11:21 a.m. on April 10, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

Robert Rowe said:

A word to / for the "K"-cups, "K"-packs  ("K", for Keurig brand-name) fans, enthusiasts ....

They work out to cost about $60 per lb. for the coffee.

Some very 'well-heeled' coffee aficionados about, methinks.

Please remember me in your wills.

                           

                                     ~ r2 ~

                                  frugal dude

 Talk about expensive coffee!  I spend about $8/pound for green beans that I roast myself.  I can buy a lot of coffee compared to the K stuff!

12:12 p.m. on April 10, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

Not quite as bad as the Palm Civet coffee.  A quick search yielded the extraordinarily low price of $44.95 for 4 oz on Amazon.  4 x 45 = 180 per pound. 

1:04 a.m. on April 19, 2012 (EDT)
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On my High Sierra Trail trip a couple of summers ago, my buddy carried an aero-press and a hand grinder, and insisted on grinding the beans fresh every morning. It was ok with me, since he was carrying it all and doing all the work.  And of course, he buys the beans green and roasts them himself.

When I go solo, the VIA packets work ok, though I usually add cocoa mix in with it for a nice fauxcha in the morning.  Car camping it's always the GSI french press.

11:40 a.m. on April 19, 2012 (EDT)
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after all this I am now off to the cafe

5:49 p.m. on April 19, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

mikemorrow said:

I use a cheap little Bodum travel press. It is light wieght, and makes 16 oz of great coffee. Just set my grider to coarse and go. 


100_0658.jpg
 

 mikemorrow,

What is that stove/windshield that you are using with your Trangia burner?

As to this thread - I carry a small french press for coffee.

2:40 p.m. on April 20, 2012 (EDT)
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I just ordered 2 infusers to test out before my next camping trip.  I ordered the Teavana and


finumteainfuser.jpg.

MSR sells the same thing and calls it the MSR Mug Mate.  All you have to do is spend $5 more to get their name on it.  By the Finum and save some money.

I read about the Teavana infuser on coffee forums.  The reviews were great.  I drink tea and am in need of new infusers, so I have nothing to loose by trying out these 2 infusers for coffee.


teavanateainfuser.jpg


7:57 a.m. on April 21, 2012 (EDT)
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I have the MSR MugMate.   Using it right now, here at home.

We reviewed these various infusers about a year ago, here.

Also, have a different Teavana infuser than the one you show.   Mine is part of a system with a stainless steel water bottle; although, the infuser can be separated and used over a mug.    It is my fav for brewing Yerba-Mate.   Use it as such even when traveling by car.  Stays hot for hours.   I like the multi-purpose versatility.

                              ~ r2 ~

8:12 p.m. on May 4, 2012 (EDT)
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One could try the ancient Asian art of betel-nut chewing, substitute a coffee bean.  No muss; no fuss?!  ...Sorry, bad taste.

11:58 a.m. on May 5, 2012 (EDT)
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I just had some TERRIBLE cawfee.

Local library was hosting an "open-house", following an 18-month renovation.   I live a block away.

Free hors-d'oveuvres, and verrry abominable cawfee.   Interesting, that when one is accustomed to excellent cawfee, it is easy to know when it is NOT.

Here's something for a little levity ... saw this 'ditty' somewhere, thought of this post-topic:

Drink cawfee -- Do stupid things faster, with more energy.

______________________________________ 

                                   ~ r2 ~

                     

12:42 p.m. on May 5, 2012 (EDT)
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Bunion, have you every tried Star Bucks chocolate coated coffee beans?  It's the only way I like coffee.

1:44 p.m. on May 5, 2012 (EDT)
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they are good

2:10 p.m. on May 5, 2012 (EDT)
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Trader Joe's and Whole Foods have 'em, also.   Trader Joe's about 1/2 the price ... as usual.

                               ~ r2 ~

                          frugal dude

1:37 p.m. on May 6, 2012 (EDT)
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Robert Rowe said:

Drink cawfee -- Do stupid things faster, with more energy.

______________________________________ 

                                   ~ r2 ~

                     

 The coffee beans do a great job for this result.  AND send you to the bathroom.

6:14 p.m. on May 8, 2012 (EDT)
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I carry the GSI stainless Glacier Dukjugs as my water bottles and use their H2jo strainer to make coffee. I consider myself a bit of a coffee snob, at least that's what my family & friends say, since I have to grind my own beans, with a conical burr grinder of course, and make my coffee in a french press at home.

Using the H2jo is not unlike a French press as the coffee is free floating in the water, so using the same process makes all the difference. First, as with french press, the coffee needs to be more coarsely ground than for a drip brew. If you use fine ground coffee, ground for a drip brew process it will come out nasty and bitter, guaranteed. Also, don't boil the water, heat it to about 190 or so. You just start to get little bubbles coming off the bottom and are just beginning to hear it. Pour the water in, screw on the strainer with the coffee in it put the cover on and turn it upside down. Shake for several seconds then let it sit, upside down so the coffee is in the water for between 3.5 & 4 minutes, no more. Remove the coffee and enjoy.

One of the reasons I like the stainless Dukjug is that I can put it straight on my stove and heat the water right in it. I wouldn't put hot water in a plastic bottle for any reason. Then again, I won't drink water hot or otherwise from plastic bottles at all so...  I get dam good coffee like this.

Heat your water to approx. 190˚


P1010778.jpg

Put coffee in H2Jo, screw on to bottle, put cap on, shake, turn upside down.
P1010780.jpg

3.5 minutes, remove coffee & serve.
P1010781.jpg

Then relax.
P1010788.jpg




7:40 a.m. on May 9, 2012 (EDT)
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I do similar (but, not quite).  

Grind my fresh beans with a burr-grinder (NOT blade-grinder) ... coarse ... and use the GSI 'H2Joe' strainer over a mug (instead of a Dukjug).   Water at about 190 degrees (best I can tell ... just about less than a full-boil).

I disagree with the French-press analogy.

This is technically called the POUR-OVER method of brewing.

Preferred by baristas and coffee connoisseurs, as well as "coffee snobs" the world over.   Whether on the trail, at home, or at a coffee-cafe.

Just did the above, prior to sitting down at my Mac and typing this post.

Mmmmm ....    Ahhhhh ....

Life is good ....

                           pax vobiscum

                                ~ r2 ~

9:35 a.m. on May 9, 2012 (EDT)
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Robert Rowe said:

I disagree with the French-press analogy.

This is technically called the POUR-OVER method of brewing. 

It appears you didn't read his post very well; the manner he used the filter is very much like using a french press. The way you state using it is different, and is indeed a pour-over method. 

[pour over is] Preferred by baristas and coffee connoisseurs, as well as "coffee snobs" the world over.

This is highly debatable. Espresso, French Press, Cold Brew, Pour-Over, and Turkish preparations all result in very different properties and cupping. When prepared properly, each has its own distinct flavor profile  that is equally valued and appreciated.  Pour-Over is no more inherently and universally preferred over French Press than "Columbian" bean is over an  Ethiopian Sidamo or Burundi Kayanza Gacokwe.

10:57 a.m. on May 9, 2012 (EDT)
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Hey JerseyWreckDiver, What are you sitting on?

11:22 a.m. on May 9, 2012 (EDT)
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Re: Coffe Latest?

Dornblaser said:

mikemorrow said:

I use a cheap little Bodum travel press. It is light wieght, and makes 16 oz of great coffee. Just set my grider to coarse and go. 


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 mikemorrow,

What is that stove/windshield that you are using with your Trangia burner?

As to this thread - I carry a small french press for coffee.

 Just got back to re-reading this thread. 

The stand is a Mojo by Timbuktu Outfitter. The Windscreen is a BRS 8 panel. The Mojo is very light, holds the Trangia off the ground, allows great airflow, and is very stable. This and the windscreen has cut my fuel cost (usage) by 1/3.

11:39 a.m. on May 9, 2012 (EDT)
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Thanks for the reply.  I happen to use a Clikstand but I am always interested in other alcohol stoves.  

11:51 a.m. on May 9, 2012 (EDT)
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Hey JerseyWreckDiver, What are you sitting on?

It's a homemade (MYOG) hammock chair. You may have seen them before used with the ropes set even on both sides and sitting upright, perpendicular to it. I just prefer it recliner style with one rope set high.

It's basically a sheet of Ripstop Nylon about 24 inches wide x 60 inches long with the ends gathered and tied. Great camp chair. Weighs a few ounces and could fit inside your water bottle.

This is another shot from a different trip.


IMG_4137.jpg



11:57 a.m. on May 9, 2012 (EDT)
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I saw the Clikstand. It is lighter than what I use, but the kicker for me was the ease of use of the simmer ring. The large opening allows me to put on the simmer ring without taking off the pot.

12:17 p.m. on May 9, 2012 (EDT)
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At the risk of thread drift.

This is a video that shows pretty well the hammock chair in one of it's better incarnations. I like the suspension system he is using, I just haven't gotten around the sewing the ends of the fabric I have to accommodate it.

Holy Cow! it worked! I finally embedded a video. And it only took four tries.

12:25 p.m. on May 9, 2012 (EDT)
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JerseyWreckDiver said:

Holy Cow! it worked! I finally embedded a video. And it only took four tries.

Lol, see... Persistence does pay off. :p

So the other day I was at Starbucks...

2012-05-08_14-24-38_73.jpg

:p

12:33 p.m. on May 9, 2012 (EDT)
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Thanks Kyle. It looks nice. I guess I better get to work making one.

11:49 p.m. on May 9, 2012 (EDT)
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gonzan said:

Robert Rowe said:

I disagree with the French-press analogy.

This is technically called the POUR-OVER method of brewing. 

It appears you didn't read his post very well; the manner he used the filter is very much like using a french press. The way you state using it is different, and is indeed a pour-over method. 

[pour over is] Preferred by baristas and coffee connoisseurs, as well as "coffee snobs" the world over.

This is highly debatable. Espresso, French Press, Cold Brew, Pour-Over, and Turkish preparations all result in very different properties and cupping. When prepared properly, each has its own distinct flavor profile  that is equally valued and appreciated.  Pour-Over is no more inherently and universally preferred over French Press than "Columbian" bean is over an  Ethiopian Sidamo or Burundi Kayanza Gacokwe.

 Wrong.

I DID read his post well.   Wrong assumption on your part.

French-press involves a plunger.

Could be more-or-less a "steep brew".  

NOT "highly debatable" to me.   Very clear-cut, as-a-matter-of-fact.

Am NOT discussing (or "debating") the semantics of different coffee preparations throughout the world.

BTW -- Are you "stalking" my posts again?

                                ~ r2 ~

12:09 a.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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Robert,

The method I'm talking about is not at all like a "pour over". The coffee grounds are floating freely in the water and continually immersed in the water for the entire brewing time. How could that be similar to pouring water over and through a filter full of coffee?

No it doesn't have a plunger but that is not part of the brewing process, just the way of separating the grounds from the finished coffee when it's done. Has little or nothing to do with the way the coffee is brewed.

3:31 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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As a trained coffee snob, alas a FRENCH PRESS is not a method of brew, it is a device for brewing. The vernacular, however, has come to equate the device with the process. The method of brewing in a French Press IS the same as the op describes here.....free floating grounds in hot water. The plunger is irrelevant. You can pour it off through a strainer or plunge the grounds down or just drink it through a strainer, though the latter would result in the over brew as you drank. Hate to play the expert card.....uh....no I don't. But there ya have it!

9:48 p.m. on May 10, 2012 (EDT)
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Most people don't have the patience to give a French press the time it should get

9:40 a.m. on May 16, 2012 (EDT)
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being in New Orleans, coffee is a serious, and much argued topic.  A local company called Cool Brew sells a cold-drip concentrate in a handy squeeze bottle.  You can pour it into warm milk or water for a great cup of coffee without all of the acids (thanks cold-drip).  I wonder if a small squirt bottle of cool brew wouldn't be an easy alternative to lugging extra equipment?  I'll bring some on my upcoming trip and report back.

10:08 a.m. on May 16, 2012 (EDT)
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Hey Rango, I am going to do the exact same thing on my upcoming trip :) 

I have a friend who is one of the most dedicated, passionate, and excellent roasters to be found. He's going to cold brew a batch as rich as possible for that purpose.

Just watching this guy talk about coffee and seeing how much he invests in his craft is inspiring! http://velocoffee.com/

10:14 a.m. on May 16, 2012 (EDT)
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We have a collapsible silicone coffee filter holder that we got at REI:


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This one's kinda heavy, but it looks there are now other varieties available, i.e. on Amazon. The great thing is you can flick it so it pops open -- it's all in the wrist (like so many things in life...)


5:28 p.m. on May 22, 2012 (EDT)
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To make Turkish coffee (Lebanese, Moroccan, North Africa, western Mediterranean, etc), use a super fine grind coffee powder. Put in small brass pot and cover with water. Boil.

Strain grounds through your teeth, sip a demi-tasse, and vibrate for the rest of the day.

5:41 p.m. on May 22, 2012 (EDT)
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I love Turkish coffee and to add one heaped teaspoon of sugar really helps

10:33 p.m. on May 22, 2012 (EDT)
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Oh, and chew the grounds all day for an extra jolt.

11:03 a.m. on May 23, 2012 (EDT)
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I am still loving the H2Jo!

Light, durable, makes good coffee.
05232012792-1-.jpg

Wrote a review about it, goes a little something like this:

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/gsi/h2jo-coffee-filter/#review24895

 

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