The First Evenings Meal In The Bush

9:33 p.m. on February 6, 2013 (EST)
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For the last several hikes I've been on, I've ended up packing and cooking the same thing. For the main reason that when I first decided to do it... it came out slamming. And once I came back from the trail and told my buddys what they missed out on. Everytime I head back out with the guy that missed the last trip, thats what they say to bring.

Well first of all... Its kind of a two dish meal I guess you could say with out the dish. I pack a few ears of fresh corn (taken from my Latino friend Shroomy while hiking in Northern Cali). Enough for at least one per person. And I bring a pack of Chicken Sausage stuffed with mozz cheese and spinach. I freeze them in the package over a night or two, and by the time we stop to brake camp; they are almost thawed. And thats in Mississippi weather. It's called Bistro Sensations. It's packaged like a fat pack of hot dogs. They cost about $4 at WalMart. You don't have to do anything but cook it. Anyway, cook them right over a hot bed of coals, and throw the corn on top of the coals (Yes, right in the firebed) flipping them every few minutes. They'll be done when the sausage starts oozing cheese, and the corn starts to pop some. I always throw a lil can of butter buds in the pack for the corn. Other than that it's simple as hell. And even tastier.

You get 4 to a pack. And we eat em on hand (no bread). Anyway... Enjoy!

BE COOL!
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11:20 a.m. on February 7, 2013 (EST)
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Welcome to TrailSpace, Shenora1116!

That meal sounds fantastic! I usually do much the same on my first night out: sausages, potatoes, and a sweet onion roasted on and in the fire. Can't be beat! 

7:00 p.m. on February 7, 2013 (EST)
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A long time ago my father and I went backpacking. We brought a few cheap cuts of frozen steak and some backing potatoes. A few AT thru-hikers stared at their ramen noodles while we devoured steak.  We couldn't finish it and the two gentleman we not at all inconvenienced by helping us dispose of all the extra meat!

9:38 a.m. on February 9, 2013 (EST)
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Welcome Shenora1116!

Are you throwing the corn in the fire with the shuck or naked?

This is the way I like to eat when I can!

I'm simply not a 'noodle & oats only' kind of guy. I find that I can travel lightweight & still eat good with a little prep work.

Mike G.

 

4:39 p.m. on February 9, 2013 (EST)
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Seth said:

A long time ago my father and I went backpacking. We brought a few cheap cuts of frozen steak and some backing potatoes. A few AT thru-hikers stared at their ramen noodles while we devoured steak.  We couldn't finish it and the two gentleman we not at all inconvenienced by helping us dispose of all the extra meat!

 A group of fathers in my town rent the Zealand hut each fall take our daughters camping and make ourselves a fancy steak dinner.  There was a late season thru-hiker who was finishing his last supplies before restocking.  He had a bit of cheese, a fist full of pasta and a few veggies, we always over buy so we feed him.  twenty ounce steak, plate of roasted potatoes and a ton of asparagus.  For dessert  we gave him a huge bowl of apple cobbler.  He ate it all without breathing and then finish the left overs of those sitting next to him.  Trail magic can be fun.

5:30 p.m. on February 9, 2013 (EST)
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In scouts we used to roast our corn on the cob left in the husk, when it was comepletely black on the outside it was nicely steamed on the insdie. We used to do the same for baked potatoes. And even an egg. First you have to poke a hole in both ends and run a green stick thru, bending the poked out end to keep it on the stick and when the egg was black it was like a fried egg. And we cooked eggs,bacon and toast on a flat rock/stone. And used homemade reflector ovens to make pies and cobbler's.

And bake bread on a green stick with the bark peeled off and the Bisquik brand dough wrapped around the end in a fist with the end covered of the stick and slowly turned it over the fire, then filled the inside with honey or jam/jelly. I have done those over my camp stove too.

7:08 p.m. on February 9, 2013 (EST)
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I always cook my corn in the husk, on the grill at home even. I soak it in water for an hour plus , when I can, its much more tender and cooks quicker.

11:18 a.m. on February 10, 2013 (EST)
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This reminds me of a trip to Crater Lake, Oregon on Labor Day a few years ago.  The weather was unseasonably cool with snow flurries in early Sept.  We were car camping and the campground was empty except for us and one other party.  We got a fire going and looked forward to a breakfast of cold yogurt, bagels and little else.  Fine for warm weather but disappointing in a snow storm.  Meanwhile, our neighbors were cooking bacon and eggs and lots of it.  We became friends and learned the value of the right food at the right time.

People thought I was crazy to bring tomatoes, lettuce and avacados backpacking in the Chihuahuan Desert.  We had to carry all of our water, so why not bring hydrated food?  I made some close friends after pulling a salad out of my pack.

6:50 p.m. on February 10, 2013 (EST)
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Always in the husk man. It cooks it very well, right in the fire. Not to mention it keeps the dirt and all off the kernals. Never thought about soaking it though. It always does the job though. A time or two, we had to fight the remainder down. Mainly cause we don't eat like that for the rest of the trip. And the next day your wishing you finished what you didn't the night before.

Never hit Crater Lake. It always seemed I was in a rush when I was out that way. Mainly because I was either heading to or coming from Portland or Seattle. Trust me when I say, "beautiful cities, but a pain in the ass if your in a truck." I did get the chance to day hike part of the Cascades though. Just right off 84. But, that area is mind blowing.

As always

Be Cool ........... U too ppine (LOL)

7:54 p.m. on February 10, 2013 (EST)
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We (wife & I) used to soak our corn in sugar water for a bit before putting it on the grill, after cooking the husk & silk would just fall off with very little effort.

I've thought about taking some corn camping a few times, just never have.

It'd be nice to find some Silver Queen growing in the woods close to camp - probably when pigs fly.

I'm glad to see some foodies on Trailspace!

8:17 p.m. on February 10, 2013 (EST)
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I do all the cooking at home and in the woods. Im def a foodie, I even own a food truck. It would be great to find some corn growin in the woods, I harvest fiddleheads, dandelions and mushrooms every year. Dont pick mushrooms if you dont know what your doing, you cant learn it from a book, get someone to show you. There are too many mushrooms that look alike, that said some are easy to recognize, and delicious.

10:53 p.m. on February 10, 2013 (EST)
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Yeah, I'm the primary cook at home too. Just one of those things I enjoy. I do alot of Italian, Irish, and Creole dishes. And I'm pretty bad ass with the soups. My wife calls me the soup nazi. I do need to start coming up with more stuff on the trail though. But, I never pack a stove, we always cook over a fire.

Cool deal on the food truck man. My brother-in-law runs a hotdog cart up in Prov, RI. Not sure if anyone on here has ever been up that way. But, there is a joint in Onieville called New York System. Best hot dogs on earth man. I swear. And I've never messed around with any wild plants unless I know for sure what they are. Your right about not learning much from books. I've read 4, and might have learned a dozen new edibles from all them.

11:00 p.m. on February 13, 2013 (EST)
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I'm with Seth. On one of my trips in NZ, I carried in steaks, potatoes, some other real food for two of us for a few days trip. We got rained on so couldn't go climbing, so we just sat around the hut and ate pretty well. It was worth the extra weight.

3:09 p.m. on February 18, 2013 (EST)
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the best I've ever eaten on the trail was hamburgers. couldn't have a fire so we cooked them in the pan. a little greasy but good.

8:13 p.m. on February 18, 2013 (EST)
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Looks way better than that freeze dried stuff I eat.

10:28 a.m. on February 19, 2013 (EST)
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Ive got a hotdog cart too. Thats how I started, and where I got my name. I have a college girl who runs the cart for me now. I sell all night near our local college. Its pretty intense, way more income than in the daytime. One of my fav things about winter camping is the ability to take real food without the worry of spoilage. I take everything I cook at home just prepare it a little diff.

9:01 p.m. on February 19, 2013 (EST)
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hotdogman said:

One of my fav things about winter camping is the ability to take real food without the worry of spoilage. I take everything I cook at home just prepare it a little diff.

 Absolutely!

I have always been able to pack light if I had to cover a lot of ground fast, but most times I'm not in such a hurry and can easily bring some really tasty meals with a little planing & prep at home. I just really enjoy eating good.

I have also always liked being able to prepare a couple of fresh caught fish for brunch or supper.

I like to take trout or bluegill and stuff it with cornbread stuffing or rice, and fix some veggies and bread for a meal - then wash it down with a liter of Nestea instant 'Lemon Iced Tea' mix.

I like fresh coffee & blueberry muffins for breakfast.

All very do-able, and you don't have to carry in fresh caught fish.

Mike G.

10:23 a.m. on February 20, 2013 (EST)
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Where I am its not real easy to catch fish in the winter. I would have to get thru the ice, I havent seen water in a month plus. I sometimes carry a five piece, three weight fly rod during the rest if the year tho. In nh I stumble upon small brooks all the time, sometimes with some nice native trout. They stock the main bodies of water pretty heavily, but I like the natives better than the stockies, dont get me wrong I eat em all. Do you ever use old bay seasoning on you fish?

6:32 p.m. on February 20, 2013 (EST)
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We are able to catch fish and wild game year round. The main reason for freezing stuff and cooking it the first night, is the heat. It gets nuts down here once March rolls in. And we don't really get any slack from it till late October. But, fishing is always year round. I've cooked alot plank style, with just a lil season all. And we've caught and cooked Rattlesnake a few times as well. Had a chance to catch and eat Nutria and Frog as well. I'm always up to catching fish and game. A buddy of mine got a permit and has a few tags for alligator this year. We plan on bagging at least one on or next swamp trip, so we'll see how that goes. I'll post some photos of it as long as it don't jam up anyone.

6:49 p.m. on February 20, 2013 (EST)
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I grew up in nc, one of the reasons I moved north was the heat. Isnt nutria a giant rat? Ive eaten the snake and gator, most of the wild game in the south, some was good some wasnt. My brother in law lives in charleston and hunts a lot, so I have access to all kinds of game during the holidays. Post photos of the food you harvest, I dont think pics of the gator would go over well. I wouldnt mind but some would, I think.

10:31 p.m. on February 20, 2013 (EST)
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Yeah it is man. You can eat them though. They make NYC rats look like mice. LOL. Rattlesnake is good, as long as you got one big enough to do the job. State record for an Eastern Diamondback is 86in. Thats pretty big dude. I've ate a good bit of gator. None that I've harvested myself. Though I used to help a friend of mine tag them when I lived in Houma, LA. It's like chicken with the texture of crawfish, but greasy.

I thought the gator pics might be too much for some. I'll get some good photos of everything though. We're trying to shoot for late March. Should be warm enough for everything to be moving well.

11:32 a.m. on February 21, 2013 (EST)
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hotdogman said:

 Isnt nutria a giant rat?

 Nutria are definitely large rodents, but by that line Squirrels, Woodchucks, and Beavers are all "rats,"  too.

I'm sure some won't argue with that, though :)

6:01 p.m. on February 21, 2013 (EST)
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Agreed gonzan,

it is a popular meat in Southern Louisiana though. It's like a beaver with the tail of a rat. If ever your driving in the bayou areas south of New Orleans you will see an abundant population of them. The area in and around New Orleans actually has a disposal team that drives around at night with high powered .177's & 22's popping them off. The high population has a large effect on the local wetlands. They were brought in from South America for the fur trade. I guess as a substitute to the Beaver pelts being over harvested in the 1800's. The thing is, we didn't realize the impact on the landscape when it came to invasive species back then. The Nutria has a masive effect on the local flora and fauna. So hunting and trapping the animal is actually encouraged. 

11:08 p.m. on February 21, 2013 (EST)
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hotdogman said:

Where I am its not real easy to catch fish in the winter. I would have to get thru the ice, I havent seen water in a month plus. I sometimes carry a five piece, three weight fly rod during the rest if the year tho. In nh I stumble upon small brooks all the time, sometimes with some nice native trout. They stock the main bodies of water pretty heavily, but I like the natives better than the stockies, dont get me wrong I eat em all. Do you ever use old bay seasoning on you fish?

 Where I live Old Bay Seasoning is a religion!

I've had it on fish, crabs, shrimp, chicken, and rice.

When I go island camping it is almost always in my pack.

We can fish through the winter here, but I do understand about the ice, in the time it takes to get through the ice, you could have enjoyed another type of meal.

I have to drive 5 hours to get to trout streams in my state, haven't ben in a while but I hope the future holdsmore trips to the mountains.

Mike G.  

11:57 a.m. on February 28, 2013 (EST)
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Adabo seasoning is a great item to toss in the pack when it comes to flavoring wildgame and fish. Tony's Chachere's Creole is another good one. Both are a season all mix. And have always worked well in the field.

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