Have you ever experienced a malfunction with compressed gas stoves?

7:18 p.m. on February 20, 2013 (EST)
RETAILER
27 reviewer rep
103 forum posts

Im talking about you , Snowpeak, MSR, Jet Boil, Bruton etcc ISO/Butane) stoves and not coleman propane stoves. I would like to hear any stories about these stoves or canisters malfunctioning so that I can "learn from others mistakes". I recently experienced a busted seal on a snow peak canister and I believe it is because I tightened the stove head too much. It put me in a very dangerous situation if there was an ignition source for the canister. 

What went wrong with your stove/canister?

If you fixed it,, how did you do it?

What course of action would you recommend to avoid this scenario in the future?


Any experiences and info on this can help out for future campers.

- mg

8:41 p.m. on February 20, 2013 (EST)
102 reviewer rep
2,280 forum posts

I personally experience several canister incidents where they leaked after detaching the stove from the tank.  I have also seen others experience this problem too.  In each instance the canisters were the (blue) Camping Gaz brand.  Sometimes I could relive the problem by reinstalling the stove, then decouple it a second or third time.  Can say what caused the problem, the stove have relatively few hours of use to its life, the port was cleared of debris prior to coupling, and the condition happened in both warm and cold weather.  It should be noted I do not over tighten my stove to the tank.

I switch to the MSR brand of fuel and have not had this problem since, but that may just be coincidental.

PS:  Just one reason why I don’t cook in my tent or vestibule.

Ed.   

1:44 p.m. on February 25, 2013 (EST)
200 reviewer rep
4,085 forum posts

I have been using canister stoves since 1978 but have not had any bad experiences with them. I have used a few different brands of fuel and stoves. My first stove in 1978 was one (Can't remember the brand name) that the stoves screwed directly into the canister and could not be removed till the fuel was gone. Only thing I hated was when I would go on a trip and not use the whole canister of fuel and then put it away for a while then go on another trip, I could not remember the amount of fuel in the canister.

There is a method I learned tho that will tel you. Take the canister and put it in a container of water, it will float with the level of liquid fuel inside at the water line. 

Also I camp year round with just a canister (MSR,Pocket Rocket) and when its cold out especially in the morning and evenings, I either cup my hands around the canister to warm the fuel making the stove work better or wrap a shirt or other material around it.

My first stoves were the old fashioned SVEA 123 and other Optimus gasoline stoves. They were great for winter camping, but spilled fuel could create instant frostbite or ruin nylon materials. I had my stove flare up once and singe my beard,eyelashes and eye brows as I lit it! But your'e not talking about those stoves.

3:46 p.m. on February 25, 2013 (EST)
12 reviewer rep
836 forum posts

I've only had one incidence of a canister leaking, I think it was a brunton. I unscrewed it from the stove and it just kept going. I stuck a fork inside and poked the valve and it stopped. that was the only time I ever had a problem. needless to say I don't use brunton canisters anymore. I've never had a problem with the snowpeak canisters.

10:10 a.m. on February 26, 2013 (EST)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
658 reviewer rep
2,148 forum posts

I also had a brunon canister leak. Granted, it had been used on a prior outing many months before, so the seal could have been weakened and getting old. 

Same as Trailjester, it kept spewing after being unscrewed. I've had inexpensive colman propare bottles do that, which was always remedied by a quick depress and release of the valve as well. That time with the brunton nothing worked. We tried screweing and unscrewing it, deressing the valve with the small tool, etc. We finally just had to let it exhaust its contents, which wasted a lot of time we didn't have before hiking on. 

2:29 p.m. on February 26, 2013 (EST)
TOP 10 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
2,329 reviewer rep
5,258 forum posts

To answer the OP's topic question - not personally, but I have witnessed a number of other folks' malfunctions.

1. The O-ring seals harden with age. You have to replace them from time to time. The biggest offender was the no-longer made Camping Gaz Bleuet puncture-type canisters.

2. The seals on the screw-on Lindal-type valves and the similar clamp-on valves do wear with repeated attachment/detachment of the burner heads. If you stick to the single-use practice that is what they were designed for, no problem. But some people practice re-filling the canisters (there are kits sold for this) and just don't realize that the neoprene gasket does wear out over time.

3. Improper windscreens - I have seen a number of improvised windscreens placed around the attached burner-head canister stoves, along with over-sized pots, such that a lot of heat is reflected onto the canister. This heats the canister contents. If you aren't paying attention, this can lead to the canister exploding and the contents igniting. I have seen several shrapnel cum fireball incidents of this type. Generally, the remote canister stoves don't have this problem, though I did see one incident where the "operator" wanted to compensate for the low temperatures (about 4 or 5°F) and deliberately rigged the placement of canister and windscreen (actually some aluminum foil bent and folded to reflect the heat from the burner onto the canister).

4. Other heat-transfer "inventions" made from copper wire or battery braid to convey heat from the burner's flame through the wire or braid and wrapped around the canister, again the overheating problem.

5. removing an "empty" canister to replace it in close proximity to an operating stove - makes a spectacular blowtorch - I have seen this twice, and by the same person.

4:54 p.m. on February 26, 2013 (EST)
12 reviewer rep
836 forum posts

that last one would seem like a no brainer. maybe the guy liked fireworks.

7:46 a.m. on February 27, 2013 (EST)
102 reviewer rep
2,280 forum posts

BillS said:

..removing an "empty" canister to replace it in close proximity to an operating stove - makes a spectacular blowtorch - I have seen this twice, and by the same person.

I have a friend who is just a klutz.  He has fouled a couple of canister stoves spilling pot contents down venturi fuel orifices.  He also has orchestrated a couple of stove fire related incidents.  I forbid him from cooking activities nowadays.  The arrangement works well.  He gains a personal chef, while I am assured gear that remains safe, hygenic, and in working order.

Ed

12:32 a.m. on March 5, 2013 (EST)
81 reviewer rep
422 forum posts

whomeworry said:

I have a friend who is just a klutz.  He has fouled a couple of canister stoves spilling pot contents down venturi fuel orifices.  He also has orchestrated a couple of stove fire related incidents.  I forbid him from cooking activities nowadays.  The arrangement works well.  He gains a personal chef, while I am assured gear that remains safe, hygenic, and in working order.

Ed

 And you gain the benefit of staying alive and in one piece.

 

HJ

Adventures In Stoving

July 31, 2014
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: Optimus Vega Stove Newer: primus stove fuel?
All forums: Older: "The Icy Log" Newer: For Sale: Moutain Laurel Designs Superlight Bivy (5.5oz)