how much food

2:43 p.m. on April 7, 2013 (EDT)
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hi well the question that is bothering me is ,what is the correct amount of food and drinks (coffee ,powdered milk chocolate etc) that a person should bring before it becomes to heavy  for say a week or five day hike .Where there are going to be towns or places were you should be able to get  more supplies i usually  bring three days food and snacks  for a 5 day hike .So what is your preference or ideal

4:37 p.m. on April 7, 2013 (EDT)
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Del Gue: Jeremiah, maybe you best go down to a town, get outta these mountains.

Jeremiah Johnson: I've been to a town Del.


This about sums up my feelings about resupplying on a backpacking trip.  Once I step out of a car on a 2 or 3 week trip, my natural preference is to stay in the woods and not come out until my time is up.  The whole point in my mind is to avoid towns and folding money and grocery stores and all the rest.  Heck, I don't much like seeing traffic if I have to cross a road or do a roadwalk to link trails.

Thru careful study and experience I have found a normal human adult can carry up to 21-25 days of food for uninterrupted trekking.  Ten days is no problem.  It helps in this regard to invest in a good home food dehydrator and have at it. 

6:09 p.m. on April 7, 2013 (EDT)
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My best foods are no longer on the market. I loved Stouffer's boiling bag meals which came frozen. All one needed to do was boil 2 bags in water and dump one of the bags in the other bag.

Never a dish to clean, and most of my camps are winter camps so being frozen was a good thing. I didn't mind the water weight, as I am not a good cook and i know it. I don't like cooking and I really don't like doing dishes.

It is a flaw in life we all must deal with, and is why I may be under weight.

But I would carry more food than I could use in the given time i expected to be out not less. I have been pinned down in places not just in winter and that food came in handy and i do supplement with wild foods as I go. That depends on what season it is, what plants there are or maybe fish, frogs, etc. Some mushrooms so long as i can really tell and they are not gone by or too early.

I sometimes find I have a lot more than I will use as sometimes I don't feel so hungry on the trail. Maybe it's other people who like cooking tend to share and so that helps me out.

I share too and have brought bakery made brownies in several tins to share in winter even, sometimes beer, and even lobsters, just to be foolish. It's been awhile since i brought lobsters though.

Walter, yeah I have that dread of coming out of the woods. It's been cold, nice and dry, and you just know out on the road there will be a cutting wind and the stench and noise of a big diesel truck.

Had pretty hard wind on the little hike we did yesterday, and now my wife is learning to just grab and go to get out of parking lots and into the woods for final adjustments or putting crampons on.

8:25 a.m. on April 8, 2013 (EDT)
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thanks for the input guys there is a wet food here in the UK called look what we found i find i bring three of those if water is scarce and the rest of the food is reiters and mountain house . the look what we found food is about 270 grams per meal but it is gourmet cuisine plus it is very well priced about half the price of a single mountain house meal

10:58 a.m. on April 8, 2013 (EDT)
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Interesting posts by Walter and Lodge Pole.  Now that we are older, it seems like people tend to bring a little too much foodon backpacking trips..  On canoe trips and car camping they bring way more than we can eat.

I like Walter's idea of avoiding towns when possible.  Lodge Pole is the kind of person I would like to camp with because he makes up his own rules and doesn't feel the need to stick to them.

2:37 p.m. on April 8, 2013 (EDT)
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ppine I don't do towns much either. Crossed the USA on a motorcycle with my Bride and we saw a little of St Louis and a little of Clovis Ca because i needed to get work done on the bike.  We went back east too, and i did that same thing avoid as many towns as possible. We saw a lot of nation Parks and places...

Why St Louis? well, because the Lewis and Clark museum there. We sort of dubbed this trip as Clueless and Lark Expidishun Duh where West is at the top of the map (serious)

The reason i carry more food than i need is so I might get to play hooky and not come back when i say I will. That is also the reason i will eat wild stuff if doing that will extend my time.

Walter you can carry a hell of lot more than 21/25 days worth of food. Things like pemican, dried peas, rice, corn, jerky, coffee tea sugar if you must have any. I carry maple rocks.

The hard part is carrying beer ;-)

Once i saw a guy sitting in his sleeping bag  in a adirondack shelter, and he was watching a tv. he had a pack I could see and 2 cases of beer, 48 cans less what he had used so far.

His pants appeared to still have legs and boots in them and i made some off the wall comment about that and in fact his legs and boots were still in his pants!

I had him then I did.. I told him I wanted a beer or I was going to move his pants legs and boots and he said he would just shoot me if I tried but i could have a beer anyway.

After that i took woods pirate lessons. I just figure when you stick your own foot in mouth you may as well eat the rest of that leg too. I am expert at making a fool of myself. My sister in law claims i am not totally useless,  that I can be used as a bad example.

3:13 p.m. on April 8, 2013 (EDT)
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i agree with all the above comments i know American trails ,national parks are the size of Europe so my question is of little relevance  .i mean the cumbria way through the lake district is about 72 miles that would be a walk in the park ( so to speak!) where Yellowstone national park is enormous  with lots of animals that could do a person harm   but extremely beautiful

3:47 p.m. on April 8, 2013 (EDT)
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john261 said:

here i am European son !

 What does that mean? Don't matter where you are ya still gotta eat..

Not being able to tell to whom you are addressing it is debatable if you should be calling me son... I am 61 and that is me in that avatar.

I am just part beast, mostly wild cat. :-)

3:54 p.m. on April 8, 2013 (EDT)
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i think there are some very beautiful national parks in america you are very very lucky

4:36 p.m. on April 8, 2013 (EDT)
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john621,

For what it's worth my packing is based roughly on calorie count. I'm very active (fitness lifestyle so to speak) and I work out 6 days a week generally. Based on some nutritional research and personal observation I aim for 2500-3000 calories per day, every day, at home or on the trail.

My challenge is to pack that many calories in the form of foods I like and can carry. Like Bill (Lodge), I don’t like to cook and I don’t like to wash dishes so I can often be seen unloading a large wad of plastic bags and wrappers at the end of my trips.

I’ve read where others make basic correlations like “two pounds (.91 kg) of food per day” and such but I’ve never really looked at it that way or found myself saying “hmmm, I need to add 10 more ounces to this food load”.

For emergency purposes it’s wise to pack some extra in case of the unknown (or “to play hooky” as Bill says).

 

edit:

Sorry I didn't speak to your actual question of "when is it too heavy?". Obviously that's quite subjective. Some folks (like Tipi Walter) will carry a 75-100 lbs (34-45 kilogram) pack without a second thought. To them the weight is simply part of an extended trip and they just deal with it. Then you have the extreme other end of the spectrum with the ultra-light crowd to whom a 34 kilogram pack is not in the realm of rational thought and not a real possibility.

To me that's one of things that I love about such pursuits: it can be whatever you want it to be. If you want to carry 21 days of food, go for it. If you want to fly along the trail and cover big miles with minimal weight, again, go for it. In all cases try to be safe of course.

 

5:54 p.m. on April 8, 2013 (EDT)
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patman, I stuff any and all wrappers into one for so long as i can. If i can dump coffee or tea grinds somewhere i think it will be come soil i will. If i don't think that is a very good idea these go into a wrapper too.

10 days in dead winter i come out with 2 swiss miss cocoa packets stuffed. I strip down excess packing before i head out. That cam make cooking interesting because in a 2 part bag item I get them mixed up. Don't much care since i don't care much about eating either. It's just something a body must do.

Shell fish I will get excited about but I mostly don't bring that hiking. The other food i get excited about is maple sugar, but i make that so it isn't that big a deal. I don't count calories a bit but burn them off with ease.. (maybe i worry too much LOL)

When i was younger I used to pack a dinner jacket of light blue velvet and wear that with hiking shorts and boots as a gag, and would have fancy cloths and glass ware (plastic) for wine.  Used to bring kites to fly too, but most of them never flew very long and would simply break up. I packed lobster more than once, and more than enough for just me so i could share.

AMC Hutmasters are known to have a weakness for lobster too ;-) Not to mention are usually up for a gag.. This can work real well at Lakes in the Clouds AMC hut and over to Carter Notch. I don't know if it will work on the summit of washington anymore but once it did.

john I live almost in the White Mountains National Forest. For me life doesn't get a better location to live. But then maple sugar is important.

Google that name, and if you like i could give you more names to google. Try 'The Kanc' select images at google

Another might be 'cog railway'. For all I know you have been here before.

8:33 p.m. on April 8, 2013 (EDT)
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there is no real correct amount, it all boils down to how much weight you're willing to carry and how much you like to eat. the rule of thumb is always bring an extra one or two days' worth. three day's worth if winter packing.

4:58 a.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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John:

What do you mean, you bring 3 days food for five days?  Are you not eating for two days, or do you mean three days food for the average person lasts you five days?

Ed

6:44 a.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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hi ed good point no what i mean is that on the walks in the UK for five days there should or will be a village or small town in between were i could resupply ,i must admit its good  to get reply s  from people that are not into the ultralight weight gear thing for a change

7:43 a.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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I also prefer that if I am out for under two weeks I will just carry all of my food. Over two weeks it depends on the exact length, but a resupply or food cache is probably needed.

Weight of food for me is usually 1 1/2 - 2 lbs a day.

8:10 a.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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thanks the rambler i would guess that mine is about that weight i have just half packed my rucksack as i am going up to the lake district to do  the cumbria way my food menu is breakfast : porridge oats with powdered milk /a peanut breakfast bar or two a mug  of loose leaf tea  and a mug  of coffee(both using the MSR  mug ,coffee mate ) then maybe a sports drink 500 mil made with a nuun tablet LUNCH will be a slice of buttered soreen loaf and a a coffee (and maybe another peanut breakfast bar ) DINNER either mountain house Or a wet meal from look what we found) plus drinks desert will be mountain house

10:33 a.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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Bringing 2500-3000 calories a day is way to little.  Especially for strenuous traveling or cooler weather.

Food is always a challenge for backpacking.  I don't like freeze-dried food much but it can be improved by adding fresh ingredients to it.  I rely on increased appetite and exertion to make it palatable.

Most of my long trips, say a week or more have been with packstock or paddle.  Weight is less of an issue and we have had some unbelievable meals in the middle of nowhere.

I was working one fall on my Dad's ranch in Arizona 30 years ago.  I told the local guy Chuck that I thought he was a good cook after about a week.  He said, "I'm not a very good cook, you just got your appetitie back from working outside." I have been using real maple syrup for 45 years after hanging around some logging camps.

 

11:30 a.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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ppine,

that number works for me and my metabolism.

I'm not a big person: 5'7 155lbs

Surprising but true: Last summer when I did that 90 mile solo hike on the AT, I was eating about 3500 calories per day thinking I needed to compensate for the strenuous route and I gained just under 4 pounds in less than a week.

 

11:57 a.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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im about 5ft 10 ish i might through in tree more mountain house meals

12:39 p.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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When I hike I tend to snack non stop. Beef jerky gets along pretty well with me and it keeps my mouth wet.

I will buy many kinds in different flavors and use a baggie and mix and match. This way I get a surprise since i don't know by eye which is which except for the heavy peppered types.

I am still waiting for someone to perfect jerked clams.

1:28 p.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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Food needs when backpacking varies from individual to individual.  Some like me are prisoners to the Tongue and therefore need an ungodly amount (and variety) to satisfy the palate and to act as a sort of security blanket.  Others can get by with chewing raw ramens and Snicker bars.

Then there are those who bring big cans of Dinty Moore.

As previously already probably noted, I organize my food into two category bags---Snackables and Cookables.  Like Lodge Pole I can munch all day and usually start the day with hot tea and some whole grain bread---snackables. 

Snacking on the trail is important too and so the need for shorts with two front pockets to hold the food (and the camera).

What hasn't been discussed is FASTING when out on a trip and how very difficult it is to do.  Why?  Because most of us hate hauling alot of food weight and not eating it and just staring at it in the tent vestibule. But occasionally fasting is necessary for people who like to eat.  A basecamp next to a creek is a good place to stay put and fast for a couple days. 

DEHYDRATORS---Any backpacker who wants to get lighter, save money and take better food should go the home dehydration route.  It changes everything.

2:12 p.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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With the loss of the freezer bag meals I am going to have to dive into the dehydration route. I have owned 2 cheap light bulb and trays dehydrators, but the key word is cheap, and with 'our' cooking skills such as they are we didn't much like what we got..

My wife is much better  now at cooking but that was because before everything we ate was carbon. I still like carbon toast bacon but not eggs..

What I hate most is washing dishes and at -20 and colder it is damned near impossible. 

DEHYDRATORS could be a topic where i would learn. I will still be me and BS around so long as you guys don't toss me... But i would still learn.

I never fasted on purpose, and never ever plan too. But you don't learn to eat weeds with out first getting hungry.

3:35 p.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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a very good point lodge poll  ill have to get myself a dehydrator ( maybe for my birthday)

5:22 p.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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john261 said:

a very good point lodge poll  ill have to get myself a dehydrator ( maybe for my birthday)

 That point belong to Tipi Walter. My cooking would probably kill most anyone but me :-)

I gave up on birthdays long ago. These days if i want something i can't make, and i have the cash I just go buy it.

I wouldn't know a good dehydrator from a bad one which is one reason to create a new thread on that topic.

Really, I am kitchen clumsy, but i can boil water just fine. The other things i do good in the kitchen are boil either lobsters or clams, and or make maple syrup or candies. The candies are debatable as to if they are any good though. It depends on if you have teeth made of diamond hard materials ....

5:52 p.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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Smoked salmon is my favorite trail food.  Lately I have been smoking trout which work well also.  If you want to have energy and be able to make smart decisions when no one else is around, I would not plan on any fasting.

6:50 p.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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Tipi Walter said:

DEHYDRATORS---Any backpacker who wants to get lighter, save money and take better food should go the home dehydration route.  It changes everything.

I have not gone the DYI dehydrated food route, mostly out of laziness.  But you have been working on me over the years with this advice, Tipi, and I recon you have finally got my goat - I'll have to give your advise a try, if for no other reason I have several long hikes planned for the summer, and would like to NOT be stuck again consoling myself that the cardboard flavored stuff in the boil bag is food.

So have you got a dehydrator you'd recommend?

Ed

10:04 p.m. on April 9, 2013 (EDT)
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Personally, I believe the little round-tray plastic dehydrators are NOT an incentive to home dehydrating.  Nesco, etc.  Why?  Because they are too small for any realistic trip prep, ease of use, cleaning and efficiency. 

I got so tired with the little things that I've given a couple away over the years.  The reason why people get them is because they are available most anywhere---Walmart, Bed Breakfast and Beyond, etc.

Once I decided to really get into preparing my own lighter foods, I went ahead and got something more serious---see links.  Expensive but it's transformed the way I go about planning my meals.  I'm a drying fool.

http://www.sausagemaker.com/32765d-5fooddehydratorwithchromeshelvesformerly32700.aspx

http://coolshinystuff.com/food-dehydrators/excalibur-food-dehydrators/excalibur-paraflexx-ultra-silicone-drying-sheets.html?gclid=CP6khLCAv7YCFQgFnQodY3cAOg

The silicone sheets fit the TSM trays just right and the five trays are ample for a week's worth of drying for a 3 week trip, etc.  The silicone sheets are necessary if you want to dry soups, chilis, fruit leathers, etc, and they are easy to clean.

1:27 a.m. on April 10, 2013 (EDT)
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Calorie consumption depends on your metabolism, amount of work and temperature(you burn a number of calories in cold weather). When I backpack, I am usually not out long enough to worry if I lose a bit of weight. On my canoe trips, I often burn far more calories a day then I would backpacking. In a month, I might lose 15-20 pounds, even with highly caloric foods. Cheese is often in the menu as it keeps well. Dinners are usually freeze dried, or a combination of dehydrated and freeze dried. Backpacking, weight and bulk are issues. Canoeing, the same issues apply, although the difficulty is getting a month or more of food into a 17 foot boat.

I have several rules.

1. Take a variety, so you don't feel like eating is a hardship.

2. Don't forget snacks. While supper is cooking(or water coming to a boil) a few pastachios or similar are a nice treat.

3. Dried fruits, are light and high energy.

4. Avoid things that are hard to digest.

5. Although tins are heavy, a can of sardines, or mandarin oranges are a nice treat at the end of a week.

7:34 a.m. on April 10, 2013 (EDT)
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I remember a quote from a 1970's Appalachian Trail thruhiker.  He said, to paraphrase, "I am losing weight every week I'm on the trail, maybe around 5 lbs per week.  I figure by the time I get to Maine I will weigh 25 lbs."

One of my food rules is also VARIETY.  Variety is the name of the game when it comes to backpacking foods cuz a boring menu is not what you want day after day.  Variety is easy to achieve if you spend enough time in a large grocery store walking every aisle and using your imagination (and your at-home dehydrator) to choose anything that has promise, whether in a can or frozen, both of which can be dried at home.

I even dried yogurt.  And strawberry jam. 

2:10 p.m. on April 10, 2013 (EDT)
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dried yogurt? how do you rehydrate it? how do you know how much water to put in?

2:43 p.m. on April 10, 2013 (EDT)
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I think I might weigh 25 pounds on the Moon..... I am also very curious about what these answers will be.

I can get water out of any food, but then people call it carbon.

4:39 p.m. on April 10, 2013 (EDT)
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Erich said:

 

4. Avoid things that are hard to digest.

 

 Erich,

I'm curious what that means for you.

What it makes me think of is the fact that I have not eaten much meat in the last four years or so; the last time I did it was not a pleasant digestion experience.

8:23 p.m. on April 10, 2013 (EDT)
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Trailjester---The yogurt can be heated in some water and let sit for 20 minutes and makes a nourishing warm drink, like warm milk. 

Patman---Sadly I have a low or no tolerance to beans in almost all shapes, and this has happened recently over the past 4 years.  If I partake a big pot of beans my guts stall out and go neither up or down, like a lump.  It's uncomfortable sitting in a tent squirming all night waiting for the required time to pass to get relief. Normal people call it "gas", I call it a brush with death.

9:03 p.m. on April 10, 2013 (EDT)
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I know a lot of people to include my wife and i that are having food issues inside of the past 4 years.

In our personal cases this came to be after taking prescription antibiotics for different things each. Of a sudden my wife can't do any dairy, nothing.

I am having problems with any fast rising breads, cookies, candy, and beer. Basically I can't do carbs.. Before i could eat any and all i wanted of anything I liked.

12:49 a.m. on April 11, 2013 (EDT)
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I used to get the kind of "boil in a bag" meals Lodge Pole is talking about when I was in NZ in the 80's. They were great. Nothing like Chow Mein while out hiking. Heavy, yes, but worth the weight.

Lodge Pole - dehydrating is a great way of food prep for camping from everything I have read. I don't have one, but have read a lot about them on various camping sites. I think American Harvest is a popular brand. You can find them on eBay or Amazon.

 

 

1:12 a.m. on April 11, 2013 (EDT)
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Patman, the issue has to do with general rules and your own personal issues. Legumes in large quantities have never done well with me, but I like them. Red meats are OK as they have complex proteins, but they take a lot of energy to digest. The Koreans figured that out with the red peppers in the Ban Chan. The enzymes help break down the meat. The main thing on month long trips( or longer) is to have high caloric meals that are easy to digest. Everyone has a a different gut biology, so some people can eat ten chocolate bars a day and do well, while others simply cant metabolize the calories. I am making an extreme example, but I think you get my point.

1:30 a.m. on April 11, 2013 (EDT)
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soreen malt loaf high hi in carbohydrates and kj of energy and weighs nothing nice with butter (oh and what is it with miles in the country  how does a mile become 4.5 kilometers)

12:16 p.m. on April 11, 2013 (EDT)
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John, I don't think we can get malt loaf here. I'll have to check it out. A friend here loves marmite. 4.5 km equals 1 mile? Many in the US are metrically challenged. But then, we got the imperial system from you guys, though we felt obligated to change it for some reason...US gallons and Imperial gallons. And then Britain two systems, old rods, chains and furlongs and new ones. And why was the North German foot 13.2 inches equalling 4 hands or 12 thumbs? Some canoe portages in Canada are still on maps in rods. It does make some sense. The most common canoe length is 16 feet, roughly 1 rod.

9:10 p.m. on April 12, 2013 (EDT)
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What s this mean? Loss of Freezer bag meals???

Lodge Pole said:

With the loss of the freezer bag meals I am going to have to dive into the dehydration route.

9:29 a.m. on April 13, 2013 (EDT)
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My kids grew up on carbon toast and bacon and they can't believe I can cook better on a 3 ounce stove than on a regular stove. My longest trips are only 5 days now due to work issues and I always bring something fresh, peppers, cucumber, celery, carrots, apples, Yogurt, You go out heavy and the load lightens with every main meal. I can no longer eat the Mountain House/Ramen type of foods, too salty for my system. I like to come home with one meal left in my pack as a just in case. Everyone has different food needs in the wilderness, based on trip type, hiking style, mileage and climate. I use the 3500/6000 calorie standards when planning a trip with boys and men and about 1000 calories less for girls and women and it seems to work out very well.

4:02 p.m. on April 13, 2013 (EDT)
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Tom D said:

I used to get the kind of "boil in a bag" meals Lodge Pole is talking about when I was in NZ in the 80's. They were great. Nothing like Chow Mein while out hiking. Heavy, yes, but worth the weight.

Lodge Pole - dehydrating is a great way of food prep for camping from everything I have read. I don't have one, but have read a lot about them on various camping sites. I think American Harvest is a popular brand. You can find them on eBay or Amazon.

 

 

 No big deal I just need a solar powered microwave ;-)

Yeah I miss those meals in winter camp. Other people wondered how i knew what packets went with which packets as there were always 2 per meal. I didn't and i didn't care. Only some one who eats for energy will do that. i wouldn't eat at all if i could figure out any other way. 

I can go a long time with either coffee or green tea and a few saltines.

I still eat a breakfast of 2 packets of combined hot cereal adding my own maple sugar nuggets. I am one of those people that likes hot coffee and tea of i can get both to wake up... Give me that and no complaints.

4:09 p.m. on April 13, 2013 (EDT)
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Huh what? 1 click = 0.62 miles 1 mile to 1.6 clicks.

Never heard of malt loaf, took is as a typo for meat loaf.

Can't do black beans, they won't go even go down.... Can't do black tea either, same thing.

4:40 a.m. on April 14, 2013 (EDT)
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Hi lodgepole it is malt loaf it is made by a company xalled SOREEN. which is also the surname of the man who invented it

11:11 a.m. on April 14, 2013 (EDT)
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Must be a western Euro thing.... What is that stuff like? I can't even guess.

3:19 p.m. on April 14, 2013 (EDT)
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Lodgepole, it is apparently a nomenclature thing. They call it malt loaf in the UK and companies like Soreen(from Sorensen) and Harvo make it. It is like our sweet fruit loaf that I had as a kid around Christmas. With my German and Scottish background, we had lots of Northern European sweet bread(not sweetbreads) and other sweet baked goods with fruit. High energy food and it keeps well, at least some do. My sister used a half pint of brandy in the ones she made and that would kill anything. They are very heavy. Not unlike our fruit bars we have here, though bigger of course.

3:43 p.m. on April 14, 2013 (EDT)
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the soreen malt loaf  was invented by a  jewish guy called soreen after world war 2 it is high carb and high energy it very light in weight for what it is i mean a buttered slice with a slice on top weighs very little indeed it is like a  moist fruit cake  with a slight bitter taste

9:14 p.m. on April 14, 2013 (EDT)
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Erich, I think I remember something like hat with green and red bits in the brown bread/cake. I didn't like it.

I come from a Scottish back ground and hate any of their foods so far....

1:26 a.m. on April 15, 2013 (EDT)
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John, I don't dispute your claim, except that this comes from Soreen's website.

"The uniquely soft & sticky recipe was created by a family whose surname was Sorenson".

Malt loaf is very similar to some Scots recipes.

Lodgepole, yes, I wasn't so keen on it as a child. But now if I don't have a haggis, neeps and tatties, at least once  a year, I feel deprived. In fact, I cook neeps all through the winter months.

2:25 p.m. on April 15, 2013 (EDT)
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what the heck are neeps?

4:37 p.m. on April 15, 2013 (EDT)
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A neep is also called a rutabaga(from the swedish word for them) a yellow turnip(different from the wee white things), swedes(because they came originally from Sweden) and a yellow turnip. Bashed neeps(mashed yellow turnips) are traditionally served with mashed potatoes and haggis at a Burns Supper.

6:57 p.m. on April 15, 2013 (EDT)
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Trailjester i didn't know that either.

10:45 a.m. on April 18, 2013 (EDT)
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Lodge Pole said:

With the loss of the freezer bag meals......

Still curious about this. I have no idea what loss of them means. You can still make them, no?

10:56 a.m. on April 18, 2013 (EDT)
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PackerFever said:

Lodge Pole said:

With the loss of the freezer bag meals......

Still curious about this. I have no idea what loss of them means. You can still make them, no?

  I don't make them and never did. I bought them frozen. These were sealed and frozen boiling bag meals, as 2 parts and 2 bags per meal.

So far I find bags you can make a meal in somehow that are perforated.

This was not dehydrated.

10:17 a.m. on April 19, 2013 (EDT)
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Lodgepole, I have seen in a store called Cost Plus, as well as some local grocery stores, Indian foods in bags. They aren't frozen, they are already cooked. I have not tried them, but some saag or eggplant bharta would be pretty good on a cold evening.

12:01 p.m. on April 19, 2013 (EDT)
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I have never heard of or seen any Cost Plus stores. NH is limited in what stores we have, at least north of Concord.

In the other 3 seasons I carry regular food for camping and tend to cook over coals from wood fires. If a tent isn't canvass, it gets set up far from any open fire or flames.

The frozen food was good for no dishes, little trash to pack, and no worry about keeping it frozen in winter. I could carry a microwave, but not the wire. ;-)

5:56 p.m. on April 19, 2013 (EDT)
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Well I found this site for example http://www.trailcooking.com/ has some recipes that would make you feel like Julia Friggen Childs in camp. Mostly simple, some good, some bad. Add in your Maple Sugar Rocks and you are already 5-Star on the trail.

BTW, You got a recipe / method for making those rocks? :)

6:19 p.m. on April 19, 2013 (EDT)
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PackerFever said:

Well I found this site for example http://www.trailcooking.com/ has some recipes that would make you feel like Julia Friggen Childs in camp. Mostly simple, some good, some bad. Add in your Maple Sugar Rocks and you are already 5-Star on the trail.

BTW, You got a recipe / method for making those rocks? :)

 Which rocks?  For carbon, or maple sugar rocks?

For carbon cook past well done. This method works best if you fall asleep while cooking, which passes the time best. I mean cook anything and everything until you have pure carbon, but stop before you have ash.

For maple rocks you start with syrup unless like me you start with a tree and get sap.

With syrup you place it is a bigger pot that you think you need to expose surface area, AND have a place if you get it to hot to fast, as it will foam right out of a pot if you don't pay attention.

Syrup is created at 219 degrees F. At that point it is legal syrup, and after that just low heat is all it takes for the temps to rise fast.

At 237 degrees you have the heat you needed to make rock. At that point you need a baking sheet covered with wax paper, and you let the pot off the heat and stir fast. As soon as the air mixes and the syrup turns to tan crystals quick as a wink get the pot dumped out on the wax paper.

Get all you can as fast as you can because what ever is left in the pot will be stuck in the pot and you will need to pry it off the pot or add water..... 

Work out the pot first....  If you happen to have more syrup on hand you can add that to the pot and use that to assist in cleaning the pot too, losing less crystal sugar.

If you had a helper to spread the sugar paste on the waxed paper you stand a chance of creating something that looks like fudge, but I would try to spread that at 1/4 to 1/2 inch and then let that stand to cool.

Don't get burned 237 degrees of hot sticky is a little dangerous. If you drag a knuckle and quick lick it off,  you will burn your knuckles, lips and tongue....

After it cools you can just break it up on a cutting board anyway you want. I use a clean ball peen hammer that is polished for working silver.

Probably this is for sale on line ...... I used to buy it that way in stores.

August 27, 2014
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