Stove pad material for snow camping?

2:18 p.m. on November 9, 2013 (EST)
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Tired of using a small piece of plywood to set my stove on in the snow, if I remember to bring it.  What is light that you use?  I have an old blue ccf pad, but it has too good of a memory, so I don't know if I could ever get a pad made from it to work very good.  Thinking of corrugated plastic similar to cardboard, not sure if it would take the heat coming off any of my old stoves.  Foil bubble wrap might not take the heat also, if it could, I could use my GG cozie.

Off I go to hit a few miles of the PCT north of Sierra City for a overnighter, from A Tree to Nelson Creek up north here in CA.  Lows in the mid 20's at home.  I can drive to A Tree to save hiking out so far on Sunday.

Duane

4:29 p.m. on November 9, 2013 (EST)
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I used to set my Svea 123 stove on my Ensolite pad when I used ir in Yosemite winter camping the high Sierra in Jan-May 1980, thats the last time I snow camped in winter. I have been a SW camper since the mid 1980's and wintered either in the Grand Canyon where below the rim it rarely snows or down around the mountains of Tucson country where it rarely does as well. And I now use a propane/butane mix stove the Pocket Rocket of which the canister never gets hot at all but I still set it on my Ensolite pad (had the pad 35 years now).

Maybe once outdoors you could find a natural object to set it on like bark or tree twigs. 

1:51 p.m. on November 10, 2013 (EST)
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I agree with Gary. Found natural materials work fine. I don't like to carry plastic, foam or other man-made materials except when necessary.

2:36 p.m. on November 10, 2013 (EST)
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Duane

What kind of stove is it, or are they?  The reflective bubble wrap would work with a canister stove.  Probably not on a white gas stove, and would depend on the stove for a Alcohol stove.   Some get much hotter then others.  If you can touch the bottom of the stove base then this would work.  If it is to hot to touch then something more heat resistance will be needed. 

Same with the corrugated plastic, although with that you could cover the top with foil tape (make sure it is metal tape) to give a reflective surface and it should be able to handle the hotter stoves. 

3:31 p.m. on November 10, 2013 (EST)
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Thank you for the suggestions.  I've used bark now and then, usually if the snow isn't too deep.  Twigs a couple times, not the best.  Some will use the blade off of a snow shovel.  I like a stable setting. I may bring some model of a MSR, brassies like a Primus/Optimus 00, 96, 210 etc.  Or a Optimus 111.  My 8/8R's seem to like warmer weather, have not tried them in the snow with the external pump.   Those,you need to get them away from the snow or the snow will cool the tank, thus reducing pressure in the tank which is needed to push the fuel out since they are self pressurizing.

This morning I set my Optimus 99 on a fallen snag and it was pretty high, partially surrounded by the aluminum windscreen.  Last night I ran my old MSR model 9 on a chunk of bark on the ground, fixing some pasta that needed to be boiled for 15 minutes.  Quality time with my stoves. :)  Only snow was on the trail in places.

Duane

4:36 p.m. on November 10, 2013 (EST)
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I remember in Yosemite in 1980 when I last snow camped, having to line a hole in the snow with ponderosa bark in order to build a fire as the snow was too deep to dig down to the ground. Eventually the fire burned all the way down to the ground it self. Making a 6 foot crater as the fire melted all the way around it.

I am not a snow camper anymore and haven't in 33 years since that winter in Yosemite. I head south in winter where the snow is high on top of the highest peaks around the warm Tshirt and shorts weather Desert like in Tucson. Thats where I am headed to this winter for 5 months.

9:26 p.m. on November 10, 2013 (EST)
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Gary, In about another six years, I can do that, but I'll probably stay closer to home here in the northern Sierra, maybe some trips to the coast or the desert down 395.  For about 3 months maybe, but close enough to pop in at home once a month maybe.  We'll see how home sick I get and being away from some of my stoves that long. :)  Arizoner sounds good.  Need to get a camper or shell for a newer pickup by then.

Duane

2:07 p.m. on November 11, 2013 (EST)
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Duane, I use snow shoes or my skis, depending on what I have. Sometimes, I use a space blanket over those. The main thing is insulate the stove from the cold. SVEA 123, Optimus 111 b or c are fine this way. Ensolite under the skis or snow shoes if using a canister stove.

9:07 p.m. on November 11, 2013 (EST)
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Yeah, I could use my 'shoes.   I never had a Ensolite pad, never knew where I could find one or even knew such a thing existed in my early days of snow camping.  Just made it thru the night, usually about late Feb. or into March for the warmer nights.  My MSR stoves do fine in the snow, just the others start melting into the snow.  The cold is a no-no for the kero brassies.


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10:01 p.m. on November 18, 2013 (EST)
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I used to use a piece of ccfoam cut to fit my stove. easy to pack and effective.

7:17 p.m. on November 20, 2013 (EST)
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I'm going to try some aerosol can foam, Great Stuff and make a mold for it, then line with foil and fill the hole.  I have some scrap lumber and plywood, something to do this weekend.  Hoping it works so I'll have a very light stove pad.

Duane

12:19 a.m. on November 21, 2013 (EST)
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Interesting idea Duane, let us know how it goes. 

Wolfman

9:00 p.m. on November 26, 2013 (EST)
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I changed my mind, returned the Great Stuff and will try a square piece of Styrofoam from the craft store, wrapped with foil.  Still not ideal.


Duane

9:33 p.m. on December 16, 2013 (EST)
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Got a round TOIT and made my stove pad, 2.6 oz.  Could have been lighter without paint and more trimming.   Real Styrofoam, acrylic paint, hot pad fabric, Auto Goop.  Did not remember to take measurements, you may have to guesstimate by the stove in comparison.  A Coleman Peak 1 400A, Optimus Nova, MSR GK.  Should work for my old kero stoves, 96, 00 210, etc.


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9:58 p.m. on December 24, 2013 (EST)
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looks like you've got it solved. I'm done with the white stuff.

6:04 p.m. on December 26, 2013 (EST)
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Nice looking stove pad, enjoyed the photos too Hikerduane.

7:23 p.m. on December 26, 2013 (EST)
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I'm waiting for a good snow year, have not had one for a while now.  Most of my neighbors do not know what a heavy snow year looks like up in Plumas County, CA and we are only at just under 4,000'.  I did not use the pad this last weekend, I camped on frozen mud.  I was able to get my tent stakes in a little.  Luckily, that was all they went as on Christmas morning, they were a bugger to get out the few inches they were pounded in.  I guess it is nicer further up the road, too far for a overnighter.

Duane

1:03 a.m. on December 30, 2013 (EST)
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I learned decades ago the most effective plus inexpensive thermo-insulations are layers of aluminum foil and cardboard!  In snow camping, I use a cardboard covered with two layers of aluminum.  (See Note)  Cut the cardboard box the size you want.  Make it fit any size you need.   The aluminum foil can be taped to the back of the cardboard.  I use two layers of foil just in case one layer gets torn or punctured.  Spilled fuel that penetrates the aluminum foil could set afire the cardboard.  It is flat, uses virtually no room and, can be made to fit any size one needs.

I have used this inexpensive device at Kingvail, Badger Pass and, Frog Lake (east of Kirkwood).

This has worked great with my MSR Model “G” stove -from 1977, of which I still use!!

Note;

Cardboard is a poor conductor of heat/cold.  Aluminum foil is great to reflect any RF energy that tries to travel through the insulation.

1:15 p.m. on December 30, 2013 (EST)
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I'll try that next, first time I spent anything to get a decent set up.   Always got by, like many other things that are not priorities.

Duane

July 28, 2014
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