Coyote: Its what's for lunch at the basecamp...

10:32 a.m. on January 31, 2014 (EST)
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I've dined on horsemeat and enjoyed it.

Nibbled on gator bits, suckled on frog legs, and munched on all sorts of odd sea creatures .

Eaten my fair share of rabbit & snail stews.

But I'm drawing the line at eating Old Yeller or his cousins.

You may feel free to enjoy.

VIDEO at link: http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=siCV3-NstCg&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DsiCV3-NstCg

12:51 p.m. on January 31, 2014 (EST)
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Meat is meat, looks like a nice hunk of meat to last the winter. I have not tried it either but if its legal to hunt and eat, go for it. I like his frozen Squirrel method. This video reminds me to get a fishing license this summer for my Gros Ventre Mountain adventure in NW Wyoming.

12:55 p.m. on January 31, 2014 (EST)
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When it comes to mammals I think I will stick with the ones with four legs and a split hoof.  

1:15 p.m. on January 31, 2014 (EST)
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Horse is quite good. Some years back my wife and I butchered an old gelding we had to put down. More meat on a horse than you'd believe!

Can't say I've ever had dog though. Plenty of squirrel, rabbit, goat, deer, and wild turkey. Fact is, we don't eat much store-bought meat, and haven't for many years. I get sticker shock every time I go into a supermarket, and go away with renewed determination to go shoot something!

I came close to eating a dog once. We had relatives with a young Rottweiler that they didn't want anymore. Perfectly healthy dog, but a bit dangerous. The wife said "I know! We can give it to Bob and Heidi and they can eat him! They eat everything!"

I said "Sure why not?" and my wife was fine with it, but it never came to pass.

 

      

 

 

2:01 p.m. on January 31, 2014 (EST)
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Yeah this is a touchy subject in the US. I’m pretty much a pescatarian these days (only eating fish meat) for health reasons but I wasn’t always.

I used to volunteer teach conversational English during summers, and one year I had an all-Chinese class. One of the methods of stimulating conversation is to intentionally put forth controversial topics. So I asked my class if any of them ate dog. They looked at me sheepishly and every one of them nodded their heads in the affirmative. We were on the University of Tennessee campus and about that time a student came jogging by the window with a big dog and the eldest member of my class points to the dog and says “delicious!” and the room erupts in laughter.

Long story short, later that summer I tried it stir-fried (asking no sourcing questions), and it wasn’t bad. Tasted like any other red meat to me.

I can’t believe I just told this story.

3:58 p.m. on January 31, 2014 (EST)
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I'd rather someone shoot and eat a coyote, then shoot it and leave it to rot. I would try it if it was offered to me.

Reminds me of a cross-cultural class I had to take in college. The professor was telling how one of his students went to southeast Asia and stayed in a poor village. Her host placed a roasted rat on her plate, and she ate it. They gave her a second, and she ate it. Then her host asked surprised, "You're still hungry?" Turns out, in that culture, if you don't place your utensils in a certain manner on the plate, you are asking for more.

5:31 a.m. on February 1, 2014 (EST)
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GOOSE said; I'd rather someone shoot and eat a coyote, then shoot it and leave it to rot.

How many times have I been hiking near ranches where the owners seem to like to go Coyote hunting just to "get rid of the vermin" in their words. 

I think if one is not going to eat an animal they should not kill it. I remember in the late 70's when I lived in Alaska for a couple years waiting to homestead. My brother came and shot a grizzly bear and a Caribou just to hunt them, not for food but for the trophy heads to put on his mantle. He told me this and I asked him, "What did a Grizzly or Caribou, ever do to you?" He did'nt care for my statement. But its still holds true for me, if someone is going to buy a gun,bullets and shoot anything, they should eat it!

I prefer to hunt primitively, with rocks and sticks. I either throw the rocks or build traps from the sticks. I am not talking about making stone tools or bows/arrows and spears. Just pure primitive hunting before the knowledge or need to improve on natural objects came to pass. I have hunted Ptarmigan and Grouse with nothing more than a thrown rock that I found and left after hunting. Sticks work well for this as well as the spin on a curved stick makes more material to hit the birds as some take to flight if they see the object moving at them.

I also build stick basket style fish traps to place in streams where fish are. Works like a lobster trap, they can swim in easily, but can't get out or don't seem to be smart enough to figure out how.

7:54 a.m. on February 1, 2014 (EST)
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I think if one is not going to eat an animal they should not kill it.

 

Gary, I understand your beliefs but I won't live or abide by them as they are not realistic or logical in many cases.

As a land owner and gentleman farmer with animals and crops I can tell you that I have seen some animals that need to be shot and killed. And no, I'm not going to eat them. I'm not in favor of wholesale killing wild animals and wiping them out (except for feral cats) but nor do I feel guilty if I don't eat them!

When the coyote population explodes the animals become a real threat and some need to be culled. No different for the raccoons or skunks. Do I kill any of these animals on sight, no. 90% of them stay far enough away from the house and buildings to be a non-issue to my animals and none affect the crops. But when they get inside fences by the house or building, inside buildings, etc then they become prey instead of predator. And no, I'm not going to eat a skunk or whatever it happens to be. Nor do I eat the mice that are killed around the property, not even those that have feasted and fattened up on my organic seed stocks. Some things are better left uneaten. Now I've lost 2 small orchards to deer, which literally ate the young trees and killed them, I will gladly eat deer. But it was my mistake to try to plant a small orchard when our deer population had reached record highs without taking some extreme precautions to protect the trees. My third attempt at a small orchard has been far more successful. Rabbits are tasty and do eat up some of our garden, but we plant enough for them, for us, and to donate to others so the rabbits are pretty safe except for when I want some stew.

Coyotes can become a real problem when their populations jump; snarling at the kids while they wait for the school bus, coming into building to feast on your chickens or setting up a den to have a litter and then threatening any human who comes into that building. Scaring and stressing the horses and cattle, which then can easily step on or knock over and injure (or worse) their human keepers.

A large rodent population (gophers, moles, prairie dogs, etc) can destroy a grazing field endanger the cattle. One wrong step and you have a cow with a broken leg that must be put down. Simple economic choice on that one, do protect the cute fuzzy critters in the ground or do you protect the animal that gives you milk, butter, meat and income?

Feral cats, or cats 'released' by city idiots into the country, kill the game birds and song birds that control the insect populations. There are no natural enemies in N.A. for these cats and they often kill for fun, rather than for food. Worse than any native animal gone amuck, feral cats should be shot on sight to protect the natural habitat. In some areas (state of Wisconsin) feral cats have done such damage to natural populations that bounties and hunting has been encouraged and legislation has been considered to control them. Every feral/released cat should be shot on sight in the countryside. And I don't like Tacos or Chinese Stir Fry enough to eat the cats. But they have no place in our ecosystem and can throw nature off balance very easily. You want a barn cat, keep it in your barn. If it is crossing a field or in the trees eating squirrels or birds then it NEEDS to be killed. Eat it if you wish.

8:26 p.m. on February 1, 2014 (EST)
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To the original subject - I've had dog (in the Philippines) and it was similar to pork.  I'd eat it again.  Coyote  could be interesting, depending on their diet the meat could be good or bad.

To the later discussion - I have issues with people who kill animals just for sport and leave them to rot (around here the ground squirrels are a popular "fun" target).  I think this is dead wrong.  However, as has been pointed out, there are circumstances where animal control, to protect ecosystems from non-native species, or to protect crops/livestock, or to protect levee or dam structures, is sometimes necessary.

And I agree with melensdad regarding feral cats.  As a sidebar, there has been a debate raging for years in San Francisco because the feral cat population has wiped out birds in Golden Gate Park.  There are two groups - the cat lovers who feed the cats and defend them, claiming that they are well fed and pose no danger to wildlife, and the bird lovers, who (correctly, in my opinion) say that the cats kill instinctively even when well fed.  When I was growing up my sisters had cats, and the steady stream of dead animals that they brought home dispelled any illusion that a well-fed cat doesn't hunt.

9:19 p.m. on February 1, 2014 (EST)
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Sorry...didn't mean to shift the subject. I really did mean I'd RATHER seen an animal taken for food. That's not to say there aren't times to do otherwise.

3:30 a.m. on February 2, 2014 (EST)
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Melensdad says: When the coyote population explodes the animals become a real threat and some need to be culled.

And when the human population explodes as it has for millenia, we cull ourselves by war and nature fights back with disease. 

Sorry but I just like hunting/eating rather than killing for sport or just to control animal populations. I understand at the same time one would not want to eat many of the things we kill to get rid of but I bet in Asia many see unwanted pet euthanasia as a great waste of a food source by American and other countries that control pet populations by killing and destroying the bodies.

I have seen too many dead coyotes in the field I guess to try not to see the world through our animal brethren's eyes. I am a naturenarian more than a humantarian, I guess? Spelling,my bad!

8:18 a.m. on February 2, 2014 (EST)
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So do I. I hate killing any animal that is not for consumption and I don't enjoy killing those that are for consumption.

But I'm also a realist.

I'm not going to allow wild animals to threaten my kids while they wait for the school bus. Perhaps that is something you will tolerate?

I'm not going to allow a wild animal to set up her den inside my buildings and then attack my family or workers who enter that building. Perhaps that is something you will tolerate?

Nor can I allow cows and horses to be endangered when a colony of rodents sets up their home in my pasture. But again, perhaps you are willing to tolerate that too.

And then there are feral cats, a non-native invasive species that we humans, through carelessness and stupidity have thrown into our habitat that has quite literally altered some of our ecosystems and upset the balance of nature. They kill off the squirrels and the bats and the birds and the chipmunks and the insect populations increase, the plant seeds are not distributed but rather sprout where they fall, the undergrowth of the woods become too dense which helps the insects multiply while other predators begin to starve off. A man made problem, and one that I don't enjoy dealing with, but its a problem the city/suburban folks have given to country residents when they drop their unwanted cats off thinking they are being kind. They make us deal with their problems while creating problems for us.

12:17 p.m. on February 2, 2014 (EST)
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Like I said I understand our reasoning. mine is just different. I have no kids ,I have no buildings, I live in a tent most of the year and use bear spray to deter porcupines  and rodents like squirrels. I ahve not ever shot anything I did not eat soon after. I don't see feral cats where I hike, rodents I could handle if I saw them.

Man has introduced and brought unknowingly many species around the planet. Had we never left the tree's to become the most dominate species on the planet we would'nt be having this discussion. We are the true invaders of the planet, the animals we have brought with us for food or as stowaways have just done what organisms have always done, procreate and move around the planet.

Can we stop not making any sense of this now?

2:19 p.m. on February 2, 2014 (EST)
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Just the other night, I saw part of a PBS show the other day about coyotes in urban areas.   Researchers were tracking them to see how they lived.  A couple things that I didn't know were that the coyotes really do a number on the rodent populations.  And then they are the main predators of those damn canadian geese - both of the eggs and actually of the geese.  There doesn't seem to be any other way to keeps the populations down on those geese.

2:37 p.m. on February 2, 2014 (EST)
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And then they are the main predators of those damn canadian geese - both of the eggs and actually of the geese. There doesn't seem to be any other way to keeps the populations down on those geese.

 

Those Canadian geese are a federally protected species working their way back from near extinction along the entire Eastern seaboard. While populations in some areas may seem high, overall the species still requires protection.

If you have geese on your property and you don't want them, let some tall grass grow (or plant some tufting grasses) in spots near where the geese congregate. They like open areas near the water, they can see predators if the grass is mowed. But if the grasses and allowed to grow up in some areas near where the geese hang out they will move away to an area where they have longer sight lines and open areas.

3:48 a.m. on February 3, 2014 (EST)
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Coyotes can become a real problem when their populations jump; snarling at the kids while they wait for the school bus, coming into building to feast on your chickens or setting up a den to have a litter and then threatening any human who comes into that building.  Scaring and stressing the horses and cattle, which then can easily step on or knock over and injure (or worse) their human keepers.

I saw the same Documentary on PBS as DR Phun..I find it strange that all the agriculture Industry claims against the coyote about going after  lifestock.. I just think they want to hunt them..Theres no proof they go after Cattle maybe the occassional chicken coop or Turkey coop. In a whole its just sport..I can actually lay these claims because I live in front of 150 acre cattle operation and across the street from another 150 acre cattle operation..Never once have I seen coyotes in my 2 acres or around where I live Yet people still claim that coyotes are a problem? Where's the proof..

9:10 a.m. on February 3, 2014 (EST)
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I've never seen a coyote go after a cow. Doubt I ever will. But they do destroy the chicken coops and eat the chickens, and the eggs. You are welcome to come watch them pace the fence at night.

But as I said, 90% of them never become an issue.

And you are correct, some people just want to kill them. I'm obviously not one of those folks. But nor will I tolerate them, or other dangerous animals, inside my buildings, threatening my stuff, inside my fenced 'yard' areas, etc.

11:20 a.m. on February 3, 2014 (EST)
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מענטש ווס נאַטורע וועט שטענדיק זיין אַן אַרויסגעבן!

11:47 a.m. on February 3, 2014 (EST)
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Hi Gary, I"ll admit to having to google that. It's been a while since my bar mitzvah. It reads "Man vs. Nature will always be an issue!"

11:57 a.m. on February 3, 2014 (EST)
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Yeah, sorry the Coyote issue was just getting outa hand, I thought I would throw in a phrase in a different language!

 

7:41 p.m. on February 3, 2014 (EST)
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OKAY, SO HOW MANY PEOPLE WATCHED THE VIDEO? haha.

If I was really hungry I would have no problem eating a whole lot of things that I wouldn't ordinarily eat.

8:45 p.m. on February 3, 2014 (EST)
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What about eating feral cat?

9:04 p.m. on February 3, 2014 (EST)
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G00SE said:

What about eating feral cat?

 I think PETA would be on you like 'white on rice'.

4:06 p.m. on February 4, 2014 (EST)
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Why is eating the "ultimate use for an animal against which all other usage is compared? One could easily argue that if you kill a coyote and leave that awesome hide to rot, you are being wasteful. 

Then again, with this line of reasoning you risk sliding down the slope that tells you that you must use every ounce of an animal to be considered "just" in someone's eyes.

Therefore I fall back to the idea that, aside from following all state and federal laws, ethics are very personal.  The most you might say after hearing someone's use/non-use of an animal part is, "That's not how I do it."  

Your ethics are your own. 

4:24 p.m. on February 4, 2014 (EST)
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I was staying away from this topic because I am a hunter and I have strong feelings/opinions about the subject, but I must say, well stated Jeff.  Your ethics are indeed your own.  

Oh, and in a survival situation I think pretty much everything is on the menu as Mike stated.

Goose, clever joke.  I got a good laugh out of that.

5:55 p.m. on February 4, 2014 (EST)
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Jason Ruff said:

Goose, clever joke.  I got a good laugh out of that.

 Actually, I was kind of serious. I don't hunt, but I definitely have a bunch of feral cats in my area. Wonder how they'd taste?


We should do a Trailspace taste test....all get together this spring with unusual animals to eat. Cats, coyotes, rats, etc.

7:23 p.m. on February 4, 2014 (EST)
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So a Feral cat is just a tame cat that has turned wild? Be like eating Garfield gone wild! Guess you can eat whatever you want though.

10:53 a.m. on February 5, 2014 (EST)
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Gary, a feral cat was never tame. My understanding a feral cat can't be tamed to become a house cat.

12:09 a.m. on February 6, 2014 (EST)
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This what Wikipedia says about Feral cats where I went when I wanted to know what they were: 

feral cat is a domestic cat that has returned to the wild. It is distinguished from a stray cat, which is a pet cat that has been lost or abandoned, while feral cats are born in the wild. The offspring of a stray cat can be considered feral if born in the wild.[1]

In many parts of the world, feral cats are descendants of domestic cats that were left behind by travelers. See more at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feral_cat 

When I was married my wife and I adopted a stray cat that lived in the wild, she (the cat) would allow us to pet her,  but she would not eat food or water we put out for her. She was a great mouser and also caught and ate grasshoppers. 

6:37 a.m. on February 8, 2014 (EST)
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If I shoot it I eat it...with the exception of coyotes. Canines can easily harbor many pathogens that can be transmitted to humans, that would be the main reason I don't eat them. I do use a fair number of their pelts though, and sell the rest, and turn in ears for $3 an animal. If it were survival i would cook em well done and enjoy, but will pass until it comes to that.

Coyotes are a real problem animal here in CT. Their numbers are probably about 500% of what they should be. The reason is here in CT most of the state is populated and there isnt that many large tracts of public land for hunting. So throughout all of these urban areas you end up with an excessively large coyote population.

Packs of coyotes if left unchecked can and do devastate other animal populations, as well as do alot of harm to livestock like chickens and rabbits etc. They are such a problem here in CT that the deep offers the 3 dollar reward.

5:21 a.m. on February 9, 2014 (EST)
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TheRambler said: and sell the rest.

Other than the pelt and ears, what do you sell the rest for. Does someone else buy the meat for something like say pet food. When I lived in Alaska the first time in 1977-79 I read a story called "To the Top of the World" in one chapter an Indian who traveled by dogsled in the winter in the late 1800's to hunt for his family and when the hunt went bad and he could not feed his dogs he would kill one of his least liked dogs and then feed it to the others. he would take the hide off and tan it and make clothing from it. He always had more sled dogs than he needed and would also eat on of them if he himself was hungry enough.

I once was traveling with a cowboy who shot and killed a Jackrabbit in Arizona while on a horse packing trip. he figured it might carry parasites, so he roasted it thoroughly and we ate it with our dinner that evening. It tasted very grainy and I would not ever try that on my own.

I eat small game like squirrel,grouse and fish when I can but they all taste pretty good when living in the wild.

 

10:05 p.m. on February 9, 2014 (EST)
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wouldn't eat coyote or dog unless I was desperate. and I mean losing weight desperate. I can see shooting feral cats, but what do you do with the little body? leave it to rot? I would think their fur would be good for something. coyote and dog pelts too.

9:31 a.m. on February 10, 2014 (EST)
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When I was living in southwest Arkansas and going to high school, where we moved to when my parents retired and we moved from NY state where I grew up, there was an old man, by the name of Watson. It was a small town of a couple hundred people. If someone reported their dog or cat missing, one would go and look on Mr Watson's shed to see if a new animal pelt was there, cause if your pet wandered onto his property, he would shoot it without blinking an eye and skin it and hang the pelt as a trophy on his shed wall. He claimed he would eat the animal so there was no trace of it left. But I always wondered why he would put the hide on the shed knowing someone with a lost pet would surely come looking for it. He said he did it so they would know what had happened to their pet. He hadn't a care in the world for people feelings.

11:54 a.m. on February 20, 2014 (EST)
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Americans have more food aversions than almost anyone world wide. It all depends on how hungry you are, and if you can overcome your cultural conditioning.

 

My Dad bought half interest in a working cattle ranch in Arizona in 1978. The second day I rode back to the ranch house for lunch because it was nearby. There was a freshly killed coyote hanging on the fence. An old guy that had cowboyed his whole life asked me if I "wanted any dog tacos for lunch."

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