Your Favorite All-Time Backpacking Recipe

9:17 p.m. on March 3, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

What is your favorite dinnertime meal to take camping? I know this may be a well-worn topic, but I don't see it posted in a while. Just curious.

Alison

11:39 a.m. on March 4, 2002 (EST)
30 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
Mountain House. Just add boiling water. n/m

 

5:21 p.m. on March 4, 2002 (EST)
37 reviewer rep
747 forum posts

Quote:

What is your favorite dinnertime meal to take camping? I know this may be a well-worn topic, but I don't see it posted in a while. Just curious.

Alison

Favorite Meal - angel hair pasta with a can of red clam sauce. Cook - mix and eat.

Favrite camping food - Hudson Bay Bread - my wife makes me bake a batch once a week to eat at home.
2 tbsp maple syrup
2 tbsp molasses - black
1 tbsp Karo syrup - black
2 tbsp honey
1 cup sugar - half white half brown
1/2 cup chopped nuts - try almond and cashew
1.5 sticks butter
4 cups old fashioned rolled oats
cream - mix bake at 325 for 25 minutes
Grease the pan really well!!!
Jim S

11:16 p.m. on March 5, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Off the shelf...

Quote:

What is your favorite dinnertime meal to take camping? I know this may be a well-worn topic, but I don't see it posted in a while. Just curious.

Alison

I like to roam around the supermarket to see what's available that I can cook by just adding boiling water to a ziplock bag. Spaghetti cooks great in a ziplock, as does rice. Actually, just about any thin pasta is good cooked in a ziplock. Pour in the boiling water, seal, and stick it inside a pot or something to hold the heat in. It'll cook right up in a hurry. I found some potato mix yesterday that I really like. It's called 4 Cheese Mashed Potatoes, by Idahoan, and it's delicious. I put one pack into a flat-bottomed ziplock, add two cups of boiling water, a little seasoning and let it sit for about 2 minutes. There's a variety of flavors, and it's a fraction of the cost of freeze-dried. Talk about filling...

Soups, rice and beans, pasta, potatoes - I like the carbs, especially on multi-day treks or in cold weather. On overnighters or the first night of a long trip, I like to freeze a good ribeye before heading in, then have a real meal for the first evening. Then it's back to the pasta. Sometimes I carry in some dehydrated hot peppers to add to the meals. If you're out for several weeks, the blast of flavor really hits the spot.

The ziplocks work great, but use the freezer strength. I like the new self-standing types, too. You eat straight out of the bag, making cleanup a cinch.

5:12 a.m. on March 6, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: Off the shelf...

Quote:

Quote:

What is your favorite dinnertime meal to take camping? I know this may be a well-worn topic, but I don't see it posted in a while. Just curious.

Alison

I like to roam around the supermarket to see what's available that I can cook by just adding boiling water to a ziplock bag. Spaghetti cooks great in a ziplock, as does rice. Actually, just about any thin pasta is good cooked in a ziplock. Pour in the boiling water, seal, and stick it inside a pot or something to hold the heat in. It'll cook right up in a hurry. I found some potato mix yesterday that I really like. It's called 4 Cheese Mashed Potatoes, by Idahoan, and it's delicious. I put one pack into a flat-bottomed ziplock, add two cups of boiling water, a little seasoning and let it sit for about 2 minutes. There's a variety of flavors, and it's a fraction of the cost of freeze-dried. Talk about filling...

Soups, rice and beans, pasta, potatoes - I like the carbs, especially on multi-day treks or in cold weather. On overnighters or the first night of a long trip, I like to freeze a good ribeye before heading in, then have a real meal for the first evening. Then it's back to the pasta. Sometimes I carry in some dehydrated hot peppers to add to the meals. If you're out for several weeks, the blast of flavor really hits the spot.

The ziplocks work great, but use the freezer strength. I like the new self-standing types, too. You eat straight out of the bag, making cleanup a cinch.

11:56 a.m. on March 6, 2002 (EST)
30 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
How long do you let the pasta sit in the boiled water?....

This is great info! You may help me break my Mountain House habit. Idahoan potatoes & spaghetti! I gotta try it.

8:55 a.m. on March 7, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: How long do you let the pasta sit in the boiled water?....

Quote:

This is great info! You may help me break my Mountain House habit. Idahoan potatoes & spaghetti! I gotta try it.

I usually put the bag in a pot after adding the water to hold the heat in, and let it sit for about 6 to 8 minutes. You can tell when it's done by squeezing the bag - it'll feel soft if it's ready. It's amazing how much stuff you can cook this way - I've taken in frozen veggies in wintertime, Minute Rice, all sorts of stuff. I'm constantly bringing stuff home to try out before I hit the trail. It not only tastes great, but the price is a fraction of what the freeze-dried stuff costs. I've also been experimenting with a bunch of different 'add-ons' like habanero sauce, chili powder, etc., to add flavor.

I used to live on Ramen Noodles for a week at a time on some of my longer bp and kayak trips. Put 'em in a ziplock mashed up, add a cup of Lipton Noodle soup, pour in some boiling water, give it a few minutes and chow down. It's really good, but after the 2'nd day, you start fantansizing about Big Macs and fries. I'd be chowing down on Ramen Noodles, and my kayaking buddy would be sitting across the fire munching on New York strip and French Bread. I decided there had to be a middle point somewhere...

I'm working on a page to add to griztrax.net that will focus on easy to cook stuff like the potatoes, etc.

As Tim Leary used to say, "Experiment, experiment, experiment!"

October 20, 2014
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