Lightweight Backpacking stoves

10:02 a.m. on May 15, 2004 (EDT)
(Guest)

I'm looking for a lieghtweight backpacking stove, probably canister-fueled, single burner. Under eight oz. w/ot fuel is light. I've been looking at Primus and REI, any other suggestions? Be specific.

3:27 p.m. on May 16, 2004 (EDT)
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I love my Bluet Camping Gaz stove. n/m

nm

12:15 p.m. on May 17, 2004 (EDT)
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If you want a canister stove, burner part under 8 ounces, you have lots of choices. One of the lightest is the Markill HotRod at 2 ounces. It still puts out a lot of heat at that light weight. The MSR Pocket Rocket is probably more available, but still very compact and light, and puts out more heat than the HotRod. MSR's SuperFly is still in your weight range (without the hanging kit), and puts out as much heat as a liquid fuel stove, although it is slightly more bulky. Primus has superlight stoves that are much the same, as does Coleman's Bleuet (Camping Gaz) division. Snowpeak also has very compact and light weight stoves that a re plenty adequate.

All of these use the industry standard threaded fitting, except for the Bleuet Camping Gaz, so you have a wide choice of cannisters. You can use canisters from Primus, MSR, Markill, Coleman, and others (Coleman has 4 or 5 different types of cartridges, though, so you have to check to see that it is the correct fitting. The two types of Gaz and the Powermax canisters, for example, will not fit the standard threaded fitting, although the MSR Superfly will take either the standard fitting or the similar-looking, but non-threaded Gaz cannisters).

It doesn't really matter which of the major brands in canister-top stoves, if you stick with MSR, Markill, or Primus. Pick by availability, price, and what you want in terms of heat output (the tiny stoves put out less heat, although it is adequate for most backpacking, the larger ones put out more heat).

There is a tradeoff, though, between canister and liquid fuel stoves in terms of total weight with fuel, depending on length of trip. Somewhere around 10 person-meal-days, liquid fuel becomes lighter total weight than compressed gas when considering total weight of stove, fuel, and container weight. Remember that when you empty the container, you still have to pack it out. Compressed gas canisters add up empty weight pretty fast when you cook for a bunch of people for several days.

1:20 p.m. on May 17, 2004 (EDT)
(Guest)

Quote:

Stay away from propane or propane/butane mix stoves if you intend to use the stove in less than freezing temperatures; particularly cold temps above 3000'.

7:35 p.m. on May 17, 2004 (EDT)
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Quote:

Quote:

Stay away from propane or propane/butane mix stoves if you intend to use the stove in less than freezing temperatures; particularly cold temps above 3000'.

Actually, since the vaporization temperature for pure propane is -40F, pure propane works just fine in very cold temperatures. That isn't its problem for backpacking. The problem is that since it is at such high pressure to liquify it, the container has to be very heavy, much too heavy for backpacking.

As for butane mixes (pure butane vaporization temperature abt 32F, pure isobutane T-vapor abt 10F, butane/propane, butane/isobutane/propane, isobutane/propane), the temperature problem depends on the particular mix, but is easily dealt with by several methods. At very high altitudes, because of lower atmospheric pressure, the critical temperature drops, with most of the mixes working just fine at the South Col on Everest at the temperatures they find there.

It is true, however, that without using one of the methods recommended by the the stove manufacturers for cold temperatures (you wouldn't use a non-recommended method, now would you ;=D), there is a cold weather problem (temperatures below about +40F) with compressed gas at altitudes most people go backpacking. The manufacturer-recommended cold weather methods work well enough that I sometimes take a compressed gas stove on backcountry ski trips, although usually I use liquid-fuel stoves most of the time in those conditions, simply because of the fuel-weight question - it takes 4 times as much fuel per person-meal-day or more if you have to melt show for the water for your meals, so the weight advantage of liquid fuel kicks in more quickly for winter trips than for summer.

2:23 p.m. on May 18, 2004 (EDT)
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a.k.a. Scott, Scott M

Quote:

I'm looking for a lieghtweight backpacking stove, probably canister-fueled, single burner. Under eight oz. w/ot fuel is light. I've been looking at Primus and REI, any other suggestions? Be specific.

I do most of my hiking/camping in the spring/fall in the Southeast US. I use the MSR Superfly and love it.

9:18 p.m. on May 19, 2004 (EDT)
37 reviewer rep
747 forum posts

Quote:

Quote:

Stay away from propane or propane/butane mix stoves if you intend to use the stove in less than freezing temperatures; particularly cold temps above 3000'.

Many of us depend on these stoves year round including Winter. They are much nicer to cook on in a tent, but you have to know what you're doing. White gas is the other choice and it has its problems. Personally I have adopted the Coleman Extreme stoves. I have an Xtreme and the expedtion two burner model. They light instantly, turn off instantly, simmer, and operate well even below zero. I no longer use white gas for anything...
Jim S

9:31 a.m. on May 30, 2004 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Martin

IF you are searching a really compact and lightweight stove you must consider the Optimus no. 42 Crux! It works also with the Coleman gas Canisters. Crux has a unique stuff bag holds both: stove and a canister. Stove fits perfectly under a canister. It is the most compact stove i ever seen!
Weighs only 87g and 4200W/14300BTU.

10:55 a.m. on June 12, 2004 (EDT)
(Guest)

SNOW PEAK TITANIUM GIGAPOWER canister stove. works well with snowpeak / msr isobutane or the primus butane/propane mix canisters. one of the lightest at 2.5 oz / 3 oz with piezo starter. 4 titanium wire pot stands so it is pretty stable even heating water in a titanium sierra cup. cold weather operation is pretty good if you keep the canisters warm ( in the sleeping bag). nice thing about it is the fuel canister (snow peak), stove, cup,spoon/fork all perfectly fit inside the snow peak solo cookset. you can have your whole cookset weigh in at the same weight as other stoves alone in a nice compact package : 28 fl oz pot , 10 fl oz cup = 4 3/4" x 5 1/8" about 16 oz total weight.

unlike most stoves, it adjusts to a true simmer. it would be worthwhile to at least check it out at your local store before making your final decision.

10:14 p.m. on August 23, 2004 (EDT)
(Guest)

[j]--Re: I love my Bluet Camping Gaz stove. n/m

So do I. I have had one for around 8 yrs now. Do you have any idea how to properly dispose of the gas containers? Any advice would be appreciated.

Best,

Justin

11:18 a.m. on October 15, 2004 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: [j]--Re: I love my Bluet Camping Gaz stove. n/m

I too have and like the Gaz stove and lantern. The problem I am having is that I cannot find replacement gas cylinders. I have a GlobeTrotter stove and a Lampe GT lamp, both probably 20-30 years old now. Where do you folks get the cartridges? Thanks. P.

September 19, 2014
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