Gas stove use during foul weather

12:42 p.m. on June 29, 2009 (EDT)
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If your not supposed to use gas stoves in confined spaces, ie. tents/vestibules then what do you do in foul weather?

3:49 p.m. on June 29, 2009 (EDT)
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I have a small light weight weight tarp that I use sometimes to keep the rain off of my gear and use it when I'm cooking and such things.

9:25 p.m. on June 29, 2009 (EDT)
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Cook in the rain.

Well, okay that's a little hard core. Like mike, I also have a small rain fly / tarp that can be used to cook under, in clear weather I use it for other things as well. I like to pitch it as a wind break as well as protection from rain.

Some people just stay in the tent and eat snacks. I hate snacks when I'm real hungry.

Maybe someday they will make ribeye and baked potato flavored crackers.

12:01 a.m. on June 30, 2009 (EDT)
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Actually, the rule is no flames in tents, whether stoves, candles, lanterns, ... The three major problems are fire (tents will burn, especially synthetic tents), carbon monoxide (sneaky, insidious, almost killed Richard Byrd in Antarctica), and oxygen depletion.

It is said that (but do not do this) most expedition and high altitude climbers cook in the vestibules of their tents and in the main body of the tent as well. It is a known fact that the ill-fortuned Wilcox McKinley expedition had a tent vanish in 10 seconds, including a sleeping bag and a couple of down parkas, when a stove in use in their tent ignited (ultimately 6 members of that expedition died on the mountain).

All 3 of the problems exist in snow caves as well - sleeping bags and down parkas will burn as well or better than tents, and caves are often poorly ventilated, so CO accumulates, and O2 is depleted.

12:16 a.m. on June 30, 2009 (EDT)
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I love camping in the rain. Everyone else gathers under my tarp to boil water and we end up playing poker and eating dinner together.

2:56 a.m. on June 30, 2009 (EDT)
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Some winter tents have stoves in them-big wood burning ones. Snowtrekker makes some of the popular ones. Those however, are made primarily of canvas and the idea is you keep the front door open on them.

You can see some various versions of these on [url=http://www.wintertrekking.com]www.wintertrekking.com

These tents are popular in Canada where winter campers go out in -20C weather or colder.

3:34 a.m. on June 30, 2009 (EDT)
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Maybe someday they will make ribeye and baked potato flavored crackers.

I'm all for that let me know if you find them.

10:01 a.m. on June 30, 2009 (EDT)
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trouthunter said:

Maybe someday they will make ribeye and baked potato flavored crackers.

I'm all for that let me know if you find them.

Be careful what you wish for...

http://www.taquitos.net/chips/Tato_Skins

... "Aroma: After a few heavy whiffs you kind of get reminded of a freshly grilled steak".

Though I doubt it can be true and I just wonder what they were "heavy whiffing" prior to opening the bag...

10:50 p.m. on June 30, 2009 (EDT)
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HaHa, tempting!

11:24 p.m. on July 1, 2009 (EDT)
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BPL did some extensive testing on CO emissions on a large number of stoves. Ignoring the fire problem, there were a few of them that I would use in a tent on a limited basis. What really surprised me about the study was that raising the pot 5-10 cm above the factory pot holders substantially reduced CO.

August 27, 2014
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