Cook bacon,eggs and toast on a hot flat rock, cook an egg in its shell

4:21 p.m. on August 16, 2011 (EDT)
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 Here's some item's I learned in BSA.

Take a flat smooth rock/stone, heat it on the coals of a fire. Lay 2 slices of bacon in an X in the middle of the rock, then a slice of bread with a hole taken out the middle, break a raw egg in the hole in the bread. Let it cook till the egg is cooked.

The bacon keeps the mass from sticking to the rock.The Egg,Bread and Bacon are all cooked at once.

Place a whole egg in its shell in the coals with a small hole poked out of one end. Leave till the outside shell is black, carefully remove. The egg is fried in its shell!

4:59 p.m. on August 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Sweet, those are great ideas.............then take said rock and throw said rock towards or near (not "at" of cource) visiting bear.  Better he(she) chew on a rock tham me.  ;-}> 

7:39 p.m. on August 16, 2011 (EDT)
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This sounds interesting and to try at least once.

8:17 p.m. on August 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Be sure to put a small hole in the egg on one end, or else it will EXPLODE!

8:30 p.m. on August 16, 2011 (EDT)
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So, What's the difference if your camping in an area of shale vers. sand stone?

9:32 p.m. on August 16, 2011 (EDT)
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NICE!

8:21 a.m. on August 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Hadn't heard the cooking on the rock.  I'll have to try it.  Good tip!

1:11 p.m. on August 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Don't think the type of rock matters as long as its not a river rock that could explode from trapped moisture in the rock. Even a halved round rock/stone works.

 I practice wilderness skills all the time not only cooking on a rock but hunting with rocks and sticks like a primitive human before making more efficent tools like arrows and spears. It takes time to make s tone tool but no time to pick up a rock and throw it like a baseball pitcher, tho I never throw it as far, usually close range on rabbits, gophers and grouse.

Rocks (metamorphic) also make other uses like keeping one warm at night in bed. Heat the rock in the fire or around it like campfire ring rocks, then take it out and wrap in a towel and place inside with your sleeping bed or bury many of them beneath your sleeping area nd the heat will keep you warmer. Coals also work this way but are more easily ignited burning clothing or other materials.

And I use stones/rocks as hammers for pounding in tent stakes or holding my tent out where stakes won't go in the ground like on slickrock country.

11:12 a.m. on August 31, 2011 (EDT)
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Our new scouts are always amazed when we cook bacon & eggs in a paper sack on the camp fire.  Place 2 strips of bacon in a X on the bottom of a small paper sack.  Break 2 eggs on top of the bacon & season to taste.  Roll the top of the bag over and set on the coals with a light coat of ash over the coals.  Roll the bag back into a bowel when the eggs are done and eat out of the bag.  Toss the bag into the fire when finished.

11:59 a.m. on August 31, 2011 (EDT)
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Seems I remember popping popcorn in a paper sack in scouts?

8:27 a.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
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I seem to remember that also.  There are getting to be too many years between now & then.

12:01 p.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
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Like the show "Are you smarter than a 5th grader?" we could do a "Are you smarter than a Boy Scout?" , I have learned more about the outdoors since I was a Boy Scout, but since its been 45 years since I was one, I can't say I know everything I learned back then.

10:32 p.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
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Good stuff Gary,

I was not in the Boy Scouts, my son was for a while and I helped out on trips for a few years and I did learn some cool tricks.....from the kids no less.

You are so right about not using rocks from a stream, (or any wet rocks) they will explode sending shards flying. I learned the hard way when a buddy made a rock oven with rocks from a creek.

I like the bacon, eggs, & toast meal you describe, I will try that this fall, thanks Gary.

I have found that one of the best ways to broil fish is on top of a hot rock, it is a little forgiving if you are busy doing other things while cooking.

One trick that I have learned from some friends is to heat a flat rock to sit on in real cold weather, this is more of a "I didn't bring enough clothing" kind of trick than something I would do routinely, but it does work very well for warming up, especially when wet due to unforeseen circumstances.

10:47 p.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
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trouthunter said:

One trick that I have learned from some friends is to heat a flat rock to sit on in real cold weather, this is more of a "I didn't bring enough clothing" kind of trick than something I would do routinely, but it does work very well for warming up, especially when wet due to unforeseen circumstances.

You can also apply this method if stuck in a bad spot in the cold by heating the rocks and burying them under a few inches of dirt or foliage.  This helps keep your body warm and core temp up at night when ya sleep and the temps plummet. 

More of a survival thing. 

10:54 p.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

trouthunter said:

One trick that I have learned from some friends is to heat a flat rock to sit on in real cold weather, this is more of a "I didn't bring enough clothing" kind of trick than something I would do routinely, but it does work very well for warming up, especially when wet due to unforeseen circumstances.

You can also apply this method if stuck in a bad spot in the cold by heating the rocks and burying them under a few inches of dirt or foliage.  This helps keep your body warm and core temp up at night when ya sleep and the temps plummet. 

More of a survival thing. 

 Yes...maybe an old Indian trick?

At least that's what I have heard.

11:36 a.m. on September 3, 2011 (EDT)
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In the movie "Jeremiah Johnson" Will Greer teaches this method of staying warm at night to Robert Redfords character. I looked thru Youtube to find the scene but could not.

A heated rock can also be wrapped well in a shirt and placed in the sleeping bag at night.

And Indians were also known to boil water with heated rocks placed in it and taken out as they cooled, repalced with new ones.

1:26 p.m. on September 3, 2011 (EDT)
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this is a real old fashion way of cooking, still practice in Mongolia - they put hot stones inside a marmot and cook it in this way.

http://www.spike.com/video-clips/yk3k41/mongolian-marmot

4:57 p.m. on September 3, 2011 (EDT)
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Does'nt the Marmot object? :)

5:21 p.m. on September 3, 2011 (EDT)
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There's several videos on YouTube about cooking in that fashion, including a whole chicken.

It's similar to the way I keep big fish on ice. A lot of the fish I catch will not fit in a cooler, so I dump ice down inside the fish instead.

(I hope ya'll don't believe that)

3:33 p.m. on September 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Gery - as much as I can tell, the marmot is quite happy

Trout - I stop believing when you said bigger then the cooler :)

3:48 p.m. on September 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Could someone  give my a really short synopsis of the http://www.spike.com/video-clips/yk3k41/mongolian-marmot link as dial-up prevents me from viewing such things.  Thanks

4:04 p.m. on September 4, 2011 (EDT)
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They basically, 86 the head and and insides are removed(think pillowcase.) They then stuff the meat etc back in with hot rocks, and tie it off with cordage of some type. 

Then they let it cook for 2hrs, and also burn/scrape the fur. After it is cooled they slice the "Marmot Pocket" (can't wait til these show up in the local grocery aisle) open and enjoy. Meat looks to be a bit tough. 

4:31 p.m. on September 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Ok, time to go find me a marmot, think wabbit. Sounds yummy to me.  I'm assuming they take the rocks out before slicing?  All this talk of fresh meat should have the sheep scared about now.

5:05 p.m. on September 9, 2011 (EDT)
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The old folks told the story again and again of heating a brick, wrapping it up in a towel and placing it under the covers at the foot of the bed on cold evenings.

We sort of do that on cold nights.  Take one of those shake-it-up hand warmers and toss it in the foot of the sleeping bag.  Works good!

5:18 p.m. on September 9, 2011 (EDT)
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Having a buddy/woman in the bag with you works good too, or so I have heard. Apologies Alica! Only thing I put in my bag with me is a water bottle so its stays unfrozen during winter nights.

9:03 a.m. on September 10, 2011 (EDT)
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I wish I could get my wife to go out with me.  Her idea of camping is driving the RV to a state park for full hook ups.  I am waiting for perfecr conditions to try to start her out with a great experience on a short pack to a really nice area during full leaf color.

She is very understanding in my need to go:)

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