cold exposure triggers sensitivity?

1:21 p.m. on April 27, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Hi all,
I climbed orizaba at the end of december and i came back with numb toes. My boots turned out to be a bit inadequate for the temps we were exposed to. It's been about 4 months and my toes are slowly regaining their feeling but my fingers have been extremely sensitive to cold ever since. They become tingly and numb when it is cool (i.e. below 60f) and get very painful when it's colder than that or when i am running hard. My fingers will be icy when no-one elses' are even cold. They are also slightly swollen. It is like the circulation is very poor.

Has anyone experienced this after being exposed to very cold temps or has anyone heard of raynaulds being triggered by cold exposure? Any references on this or recommendations for warm gloves that 'breathe' would be very much appreciated. I'm hoping that daily exposure to 90f+ temps will reslove this in time but in the meantime, i'm getting some strange looks wearing gloves while running in 65f weather.

Thanks
Carol

6:49 a.m. on April 30, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Kevin Rooney

Carol -

It sounds like you may have nerve damage to your toes, and it may take many months before the tingling and numbness subside if your experience is similar to mine. They'll probably always be somewhat sensitive to cold, although they may get better over the years if they don't get frostbitten/deep-chilled again. It can be a long slow process.

As to whether it's Reynaud's - you'll probably need some tests to determine that. Also - if you can find a doctor who also enjoys high altitude climbs, then he/she may be able to give you some first-hand advice.

 

Quote:

Hi all,
I climbed orizaba at the end of december and i came back with numb toes. My boots turned out to be a bit inadequate for the temps we were exposed to. It's been about 4 months and my toes are slowly regaining their feeling but my fingers have been extremely sensitive to cold ever since. They become tingly and numb when it is cool (i.e. below 60f) and get very painful when it's colder than that or when i am running hard. My fingers will be icy when no-one elses' are even cold. They are also slightly swollen. It is like the circulation is very poor.

Has anyone experienced this after being exposed to very cold temps or has anyone heard of raynaulds being triggered by cold exposure? Any references on this or recommendations for warm gloves that 'breathe' would be very much appreciated. I'm hoping that daily exposure to 90f+ temps will reslove this in time but in the meantime, i'm getting some strange looks wearing gloves while running in 65f weather.

Thanks
Carol

12:27 p.m. on April 30, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Ron

I had to have the ends of 2 fingers removed due to frostbite suffered on Aconcagua. Several other fingers recovered on their own. That was in February 2002. Since that time, I have had to be extremely careful of any cold exposure. I try to think ahead and minimize all events that will cause me to have to expose my skin to the outer air on cooler climbs. Most people show up at the start of a climb and put their boots on there. If possible, I put mine on at home. I have my pack ready to go. I wear polypro liners inside of an outer shell and use chemical hand warmers. If it's colder, I exchange the outer shells with down mitts. During the climb, I try to have everything as handy as possible to eliminate taking off gloves to fool with zippers, snaps, buckles, and such. I keep my snack stuff.........candy bars, power gel....in a pouch on my waist band. My water bottle is binered on to my hip belt or I use a platypus. I can't afford to screw around as much with a camera but I do keep a small point and shoot (Olympus Stylus) in a pouch on my shoulder strap. This doesn't really answer your question but is more of an indication of how I have to deal with the problem. I just bought some wrist bands from the Crazy Creek Chair folks that are made out of fleece and velcro and each hold a handwarmer. The idea is that they would warm up the blood supply to your hands as it flows thru your wrists. I have not used them yet.

I've been told that recovery does occur but that it is a very lengthy process. Good luck!

10:02 p.m. on September 18, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Quote:

Hi all,
I climbed orizaba at the end of december and i came back with numb toes. My boots turned out to be a bit inadequate for the temps we were exposed to. It's been about 4 months and my toes are slowly regaining their feeling but my fingers have been extremely sensitive to cold ever since. They become tingly and numb when it is cool (i.e. below 60f) and get very painful when it's colder than that or when i am running hard. My fingers will be icy when no-one elses' are even cold. They are also slightly swollen. It is like the circulation is very poor.

Has anyone experienced this after being exposed to very cold temps or has anyone heard of raynaulds being triggered by cold exposure? Any references on this or recommendations for warm gloves that 'breathe' would be very much appreciated. I'm hoping that daily exposure to 90f+ temps will reslove this in time but in the meantime, i'm getting some strange looks wearing gloves while running in 65f weather.

Thanks
Carol

Yes, cold exposure does trigger a future response. I read a rather detailed govt report that determined cold exposure was a learned experience that was easily triggered by the next cold exposure. The report also stated that this learned response could be changed by a procedure that included exposing the lightly clad body to low temperature (the example was an enclosed but unheated porch). The body would react to the cold on the face and arms, but the feet and hands were wrapped and heated by a seperate heat source. The body would then re-learn that a cold face doesn't neccessarily result in cold feet or hands. This process required many heated exposures change the auto-response that shuts off the blood supply to feet and hands. Makes sense to me. Big Ed

10:27 a.m. on November 1, 2002 (EST)
(Guest)

Well I suffer from Raynaulds, seeminlgy for no apparent reason. I haven't heard of it being triggered by very cold conditions, but if it runs in your family then that could be the reason, just u have never noticed it that much before?

My hands get extremeley painful,even if it is not particularly cold. For instance I can't put my hands in cold water, because the pain is horrible.

I haven't heard about getting 'breathable' gloves, but a doctor who suffered from the same thing recomended silk gloves to be worn underneath normal gloves, and they really do work!! You have to be careful that the second pai of gloves doesn't get too tight though. Silk gloves an be bought anwyhere, althoguth they can be a bit expensive. I bought a pair from a motorcycle shop for

11:03 a.m. on January 15, 2003 (EST)
(Guest)

Quote:

Hi all,
I climbed orizaba at the end of december and i came back with numb toes. My boots turned out to be a bit inadequate for the temps we were exposed to. It's been about 4 months and my toes are slowly regaining their feeling but my fingers have been extremely sensitive to cold ever since. They become tingly and numb when it is cool (i.e. below 60f) and get very painful when it's colder than that or when i am running hard. My fingers will be icy when no-one elses' are even cold. They are also slightly swollen. It is like the circulation is very poor.

Has anyone experienced this after being exposed to very cold temps or has anyone heard of raynaulds being triggered by cold exposure? Any references on this or recommendations for warm gloves that 'breathe' would be very much appreciated. I'm hoping that daily exposure to 90f+ temps will reslove this in time but in the meantime, i'm getting some strange looks wearing gloves while running in 65f weather.

Thanks
Carol

July 30, 2014
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