light boots for rock (and snow)

11:28 p.m. on June 5, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Chris

I'm looking for a pair of light boots that are flexible and excels for the approach hike, talus hopping and rock scrambling but would also suitable for being used in snow. I guess my ideal boot would be waterproof, high-topped trail running shoes. Sticky rubber would be a plus too. (Well, I can dream, right? :-)

At this point I am NOT looking for something really stiff, like typical heavy-weight mountaineering boots. Last weekend I ended up leading 5th class stuff in my Solomon Mountain 9's and decided I'd be a lot happier with a more flexible, less clunky boot, as long as it can handle the snow. I have a pair of strap-on cramons which should fit on just about anything...

All recommendations/comments/suggestions are welcome!

Thanks!
Chris

7:19 a.m. on June 6, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Rec looking on La Sportiva's web site-they have a lot of hybrid shoe/boots with sticky rubber and gaiters.

1:28 p.m. on June 6, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Chris

Quote:

Rec looking on La Sportiva's web site-they have a lot of hybrid shoe/boots with sticky rubber and gaiters.

Thanks! A lot of their shoes are overly stiff, but someone was telling me to check out the Glacier as it was less stiff.

I'd be interested in hearing what other people use for a climb that involves a lot of class 4 & little easy 5th class rock, but a substantial amount of snow on the approach (and the possibilty of snow on the route itself).

I remember coming across a review of a new "do everything" shoe on the Rock & Ice web site (I think) several weeks ago, but I forgot the name of the shoe and can't find it anywhere. It was Italian but not one of the big brands that I was already familier with like La Sportiva.

7:05 p.m. on June 6, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

A suggestion

5.10s or any low cut trail shoe with sticky rubber.

I have heard of guys getting up mexican volcanoes in tennish shoes with plastic bags as gaiters and a pair of strap on crampons.

If you want rock shoe performance and approach shoe comfort, go sticky rubber standards(rolando garibrotti strips the soles off his running shoes and resoles them with sticky rubber I hear). Just water proof them and/or strap the bread sack on, strap on the sharp stuff and go.

One shoe will not do it all well. It will just do them all poorly. Choose what you want the most and concentrate on that, you can compensate for the other stuff.

matt

7:34 a.m. on June 7, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Have a look at the Solomon Pro Sticky Mid

Retails for around $110.

12:38 p.m. on June 7, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Chris
Re: Have a look at the Solomon Pro Sticky Mid

Quote:

Retails for around $110.

Thanks, this looks like exactly the kind of shoe I'm looking for.

5:21 p.m. on June 7, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

I have no experience with them personally, but the la Sportiva Winter Mega and Mega max look like great shoes for serious technical rock climbing but in cold weather. Not sure that they would do deep snow or handle crampons. Look under climbing shoe section. Also, their Trango series might work-I have the Trango ice for ice climbing-very light weight and comfortable boots. Not sure about the "do all" boot.

11:36 a.m. on June 10, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. KCSteve

I have a pair of Five Ten "Guide Almighty's". This boot might fit the bill. It is a mid-high boot, light weight, flexible and would take strap on crampons no problem.

It is not waterproof but you could do a reasonable job with Nikwax. The sole uses Stealth rubber and is very sticky. It is a reasonably smooth out-sole, so is not going to provide good purchase descending mud or snow without crampons.

I have used the boots extensively...even carrying 45-50 lbs. for 4 days/3 nights in Rocky Mountain National Park last summer. They lace all the way down to the toes like a rock shoe. I use 2 separate laces on each shoe and that gives me the ability to really fit the boots to my feet. I also use an aftermarket footbed which helps when I am carrying heavier loads long distances.

I really love these boots, and they only cost about $89. You can get them through "Mountain Equipment", and possibly REI.

Quote:

Rec looking on La Sportiva's web site-they have a lot of hybrid shoe/boots with sticky rubber and gaiters.

1:01 p.m. on June 13, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Quote:

I have a pair of Five Ten "Guide Almighty's". This boot might fit the bill. It is a mid-high boot, light weight, flexible and would take strap on crampons no problem.

It is not waterproof but you could do a reasonable job with Nikwax. The sole uses Stealth rubber and is very sticky. It is a reasonably smooth out-sole, so is not going to provide good purchase descending mud or snow without crampons.

I have used the boots extensively...even carrying 45-50 lbs. for 4 days/3 nights in Rocky Mountain National Park last summer. They lace all the way down to the toes like a rock shoe. I use 2 separate laces on each shoe and that gives me the ability to really fit the boots to my feet. I also use an aftermarket footbed which helps when I am carrying heavier loads long distances.

I really love these boots, and they only cost about $89. You can get them through "Mountain Equipment", and possibly REI.

Quote:

Rec looking on La Sportiva's web site-they have a lot of hybrid shoe/boots with sticky rubber and gaiters.

1:08 p.m. on June 13, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Question re crampons

These sound very interesting. Can you really use a crampon with them? They might fill the bill for my Mt. Challenger trip in Sept: long nasty approach, short glacier climb, short rock climb at the top (so I'm told). Perhaps the Grivel G-10 New Classic (name?) would work with them. I love the thought of doing the approach in these instead of my LS Makalus, which I hate for hiking.

Quote:

I have a pair of Five Ten "Guide Almighty's". This boot might fit the bill. It is a mid-high boot, light weight, flexible and would take strap on crampons no problem.

It is not waterproof but you could do a reasonable job with Nikwax. The sole uses Stealth rubber and is very sticky. It is a reasonably smooth out-sole, so is not going to provide good purchase descending mud or snow without crampons.

I have used the boots extensively...even carrying 45-50 lbs. for 4 days/3 nights in Rocky Mountain National Park last summer. They lace all the way down to the toes like a rock shoe. I use 2 separate laces on each shoe and that gives me the ability to really fit the boots to my feet. I also use an aftermarket footbed which helps when I am carrying heavier loads long distances.

I really love these boots, and they only cost about $89. You can get them through "Mountain Equipment", and possibly REI.

Quote:

Rec looking on La Sportiva's web site-they have a lot of hybrid shoe/boots with sticky rubber and gaiters.

11:10 a.m. on June 14, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. KCSteve
Re: Question re crampons

That's the strap-on crampon I have too. They should work as long as you are not trying to do anything too technical (vertical or extrememly icy).

I have Makalus also. They still are not broken in!! I have Koflach Degrees which I use with my step-in crampons for any serious glacier work, and for winter travel.

Quote:

These sound very interesting. Can you really use a crampon with them? They might fill the bill for my Mt. Challenger trip in Sept: long nasty approach, short glacier climb, short rock climb at the top (so I'm told). Perhaps the Grivel G-10 New Classic (name?) would work with them. I love the thought of doing the approach in these instead of my LS Makalus, which I hate for hiking.

Quote:

I have a pair of Five Ten "Guide Almighty's". This boot might fit the bill. It is a mid-high boot, light weight, flexible and would take strap on crampons no problem.

It is not waterproof but you could do a reasonable job with Nikwax. The sole uses Stealth rubber and is very sticky. It is a reasonably smooth out-sole, so is not going to provide good purchase descending mud or snow without crampons.

I have used the boots extensively...even carrying 45-50 lbs. for 4 days/3 nights in Rocky Mountain National Park last summer. They lace all the way down to the toes like a rock shoe. I use 2 separate laces on each shoe and that gives me the ability to really fit the boots to my feet. I also use an aftermarket footbed which helps when I am carrying heavier loads long distances.

I really love these boots, and they only cost about $89. You can get them through "Mountain Equipment", and possibly REI.

Quote:

Rec looking on La Sportiva's web site-they have a lot of hybrid shoe/boots with sticky rubber and gaiters.

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