Ropes???

3:20 p.m. on August 16, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

What is the standard (size, brand, model) for single line trad climbing? For cragging and toproping, I am assuming you want a static dry line? Who delivers the goods while not breaking the bank?

4:00 p.m. on August 16, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Hey Johnnyjohn,

*And anyone else just getting started*:

A rope is THE LAST thing you should buy!

Buy a harness, and a COMFORTABLE pair of rock shoes (you can get the painfully tight, hatefull shoes after you've mastered 5.9). THEN hire a guide to teach you climbing. Once you've got the basics down, start looking for partners willing to take you on some climbs (they already have a rope). After you've got lots of climbs in, and think you're ready to lead, ask your partner if you can lead the next pitch. If you're even half competent, they will say yes. If you survive the experience, and aren't too afraid keep climbing, get in some more leads on other people's gear. Finally, you are ready to start shopping for a trad rack and a rope! A good way to do this while not breaking the bank, is buy it a little at a time, look/wait for sales, and meanwhile keep getting in lots of climbs on your different parnters gear.

Once again: Buy the rope LAST!

Good Luck! Have Fun!
-Steve


Quote:

What is the standard (size, brand, model) for single line trad climbing? For cragging and toproping, I am assuming you want a static dry line? Who delivers the goods while not breaking the bank?

10:02 p.m. on August 16, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Don M, Don Morris, Don P. Morris

Quote:

What is the standard (size, brand, model) for single line trad climbing? For cragging and toproping, I am assuming you want a static dry line? Who delivers the goods while not breaking the bank?

You want a dynamic rope for all those pursuits. Static rope is for rapelling, typically in caving or rescue applications.

10:59 a.m. on August 19, 2002 (EDT)
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Johnny, Johnny, Johnny, ...

Quote:

What is the standard (size, brand, model) for single line trad climbing? For cragging and toproping, I am assuming you want a static dry line? Who delivers the goods while not breaking the bank?

There is no "standard" size/brand/model for single line trad climbing. Unless you want to say that Edelrid/Mammut/Blue Water/Sterling/etc, etc, etc is the standard brand (in other words, all the dozen reputable brands that meet CE/UIAA standards), and anywhere between 9 and 11 mm diameter, anywhere from 40 to 100 meters length that meets CE/UIAA single rope standards, and any model, dry or nondry, that meets CE/UIAA standards is "standard". You will find trad climbers anywhere in that range.

And hikerdon is right that for trad climbing, you want a dynamic rope. Statics are for haul lines, rappelling (usually used for training with rappel lines in a fixed location), and fixed lines.

But Steve is right. The rope is about the last thing you should be buying (dunno, did we misinterpret that you are just getting into climbing and are thinking about buying stuff? Or are you wondering about your bud and if he is crazy for using the hardware store manila rope? Lots of us oldtimers started on HSMR, and are lucky enough to have survived. Some even started on clothesline. But don't do that, given what your life is worth and the availability of good ropes.)

The first thing to buy is a good pair of rock shoes and a harness. I have to disagree slightly with Steve about the guide/instructor, though. You can learn the basics by going to your local gym and bouldering area. Actually, you only need the shoes to start with, as long as you stay within your shoulder height of the ground. You can do a lot of watching and after a few months get a good idea of who is safe and who isn't. Then you can hook up with someone safe and experienced to learn a bit more about climbing by following (you will have that harness by then). Count on at least 30 to 40 days following before thinking about the rest of the gear, although you will probably pick up a rappel/belay device and some carabiners by then (an experienced partner will have extras to loan for a while).

Guides and instructional services are reasonable for an accelerated start, but a lot of the guide services are interested in building a repeat clientele, rather than training you to get out on your own. Nothing really wrong with that, but if you do all your climbing with a guide service, then you have no need of a rope (your question about the rope implies you intend to get out on your own).

For a better answer, tell us more about what you really want to do.

11:45 a.m. on August 19, 2002 (EDT)
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Dynamic rope for climbing!!

Quote:

A rope is THE LAST thing you should buy!

You can TR with a rope and make a suitable harness out of webbing whilst wearing your approach shoes.

When I see a beginner with a brand new rope, tells me that the person is very interested in climbing and willing to provide one piece of community gear that can get ruined or will need replacing. Higher on my totem pole.

Quote:

THEN hire a guide to teach you climbing.

Bill S made some nice alternate suggestions.

Brian in SLC

10:42 p.m. on August 25, 2002 (EDT)
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Re: Johnny, Johnny, Johnny, ...

Quote:

Or are you wondering about your bud and if he is crazy for using the hardware store manila rope? Lots of us oldtimers started on HSMR, and are lucky enough to have survived. Some even started on clothesline.

You had Hardware store manila? My first rappel rope was made in Boy Scout camp from twisted twine. I had a nice strong belt in my levis that served as a harness and a store bought carabiner through the buckle as a brake.
Jim

September 22, 2014
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