Wild Things and other primaloft jackets

2:35 p.m. on February 19, 2003 (EST)
(Guest)

Anyone own the Wild Things primaloft sweater?

I'm interested in the fit. how long is it, etc?

have any other advice on the best primaloft jacket out there.

6:54 p.m. on February 19, 2003 (EST)
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have 2 primaloft jackets

I have an old Marmot primaloft jacket that has seen a lot of hard use and a 2 yr old Integral Designs Dolomiti. I use both of them a lot. The Dolomiti is a "belay jacket", and as such has a hood (large enough to fit over your helmet). Both the jackets stuff quite small and fluff up well. Most of the time, I would take one of these rather than a fleece jacket - warmer, lighter, more compact, seem to expel water and moisture faster than the fleece. The Marmot does not have a hood, while the ID can be ordered without a hood, with a removable hood, or like mine, with the hood sewn on. I also have a Marmot primaloft sleeping bag, which sees a lot of 3-season use. Primaloft seems to hold up a lot better than other synth, and is a lot closer to down in warmth, loft, compressability.

11:00 a.m. on February 20, 2003 (EST)
(Guest)

I owned the WT primaloft sweater. Here's my take:

Good: Fairly warm, weighs about 1 lb, No BS features, packs pretty small, Athletic cut, Layers under shell nicely.

Bad: Quilting stitching is not very good quality. Threads hanging off all over the place. I called WT and they said this did not affect the warmth or function of the jacket. This is true, but it still bothered me. Elastic cuffs at hands don't open wide enough. I had to wiggle my hands quite a bit to get them in and out of the cuffs. This was quite annoying, and I don't have huge hands.

All in all it does what it's designed to. I would have kept it if they fixed those items I mentioned above. I actually preferred my Moonstone Cirrus jacket to this one which cost half the price. Although it did have those lame pitzips and fit was a little baggier.

That Marmot one looks pretty nice. I also own the TNF redpoint jacket. It's OK, but the insulation seems really thin. the WT jacket was definitely warmer.

9:35 a.m. on February 21, 2003 (EST)
(Guest)

While I can't comment on their sweater, I do own a Denali jacket. It's super warm, very weatherproof, primaloft is good good good (warm, pretty compressable, etc.). On the downside the shell fabric makes it pretty bulky. It does it job of being a no-questions ugly weather coat really well. I've become a big fan of WT through that coat and their shell pants I own. Hope this helps.

 

Quote:

Anyone own the Wild Things primaloft sweater?

I'm interested in the fit. how long is it, etc?

have any other advice on the best primaloft jacket out there.

12:27 a.m. on March 5, 2003 (EST)
(Guest)

Quote:

Anyone own the Wild Things primaloft sweater?

I'm interested in the fit. how long is it, etc?

have any other advice on the best primaloft jacket out there.

I own an ID Dolomitti and a Arc'teryx Fission SV both nice jackets with slightly different takes. The Arc'teryx has Gore XCR as the shell material which allows you to dump your hard shell and save weight. The ID jacket has Pertex as the shell material, which is not as wind resistant as the manufacturer claims. I find myself still donning a hard shell jacket when the wind kicks up.

Primaloft has some advantages over Polarguard 3D/HV, it compresses better, is more hydrophobic, and feels more down like. However it also has some drawbacks. #1 it is more expensive and #2 it does NOT last as long.

The real question is do you want to spend that extra money on a jacket. Over the years I have found that a Polarguard 3D jacket, which is cheaper and lasts longer, works just as well as the primaloft jackets. Conversely, my synthetic sleeping bags are all Primaloft, mostly due to the compressibility issue and because sleeping bags use more insulative material than jackets.

The bottom line is both Primaloft and Polarguard 3D/HV work fine in a jacket.

Good Luck

1:33 p.m. on March 5, 2003 (EST)
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Quote:

I own an ID Dolomitti and a Arc'teryx Fission SV both nice jackets with slightly different takes. ...The ID jacket has Pertex as the shell material, which is not as wind resistant as the manufacturer claims. I find myself still donning a hard shell jacket when the wind kicks up.

Not sure what you mean by "when the wind kicks up", but I have had no problems with my Dolomiti. Pertex is not waterproof (only described as water resistant), but it is very windproof, at least in my experience (which includes cold winter storm with pretty strong winds - "pretty strong" = 30-40 knots measured in my terminology).

Quote:

Primaloft has some advantages over Polarguard 3D/HV, it compresses better, is more hydrophobic, and feels more down like. However it also has some drawbacks. #1 it is more expensive and #2 it does NOT last as long.

Have to disagree with both points. Since I have had a Primaloft sleeping bag for over ten years and a Marmot Primaloft jacket for 7 or 8 years, plus a variety of Polargard and other bags and jackets, my experience is that the Primaloft has outlasted the Polargard in terms of retaining loft after much usage and many washings. In cases where I had a choice of nominally comparable Primaloft and Polargard items (same rating for temperature), the price was pretty comparable. The Primaloft items were generally lighter than the Polargard, at the same nominal temperature rating (recall that HV and 3D have different temperature ratings per weight as well). As everyone knows, temperature ratings are pretty bogus, but the Primaloft items I have seem to match the temperature ratings reasonably well (probably due to the manufacturers of those items being more conservative in their ratings than the Polargard items I have). HV and 3D are much improved over the earlier Polargard (a couple of my earlier Polargard bags lost major fractions of their loft within 100-200 nights usage).

I sure wish this knee would heal, though. I haven't been on skis in weeks nor in the backcountry sleeping in snow in almost 2 months.

10:23 a.m. on March 14, 2003 (EST)
(Guest)

think about MEC

i have the WT Belay Jacket. excellent jacket w/ EPIC shell. works great for what it is designed for, but pricey.

when i was looking for a sweater, i ended up at MEC. they have primaloft sweaters and jackets in mid and heavy weight. prices are downright cheap. i ended up w/ a mid-weight sweater....kind of like the Pat Puffball. I think i paid about $55 on sale. Regardless, MEC provides a less expensive option w/o a real sacrifice in quality.

todd.

11:58 p.m. on March 17, 2003 (EST)
(Guest)

Quote:

Not sure what you mean by "when the wind kicks up", but I have had no problems with my Dolomiti. Pertex is not waterproof (only described as water resistant), but it is very windproof, at least in my experience (which includes cold winter storm with pretty strong winds - "pretty strong" = 30-40 knots measured in my terminology).

Around 30+ knots I have noticed wind leakage through the fabric. This is not bad, by the way, for such a light fabric that is marketed as being wind resistant. As I said before all you need to do is to put on your hard shell to combat this.

Quote:

Quote:

Primaloft has some advantages over Polarguard 3D/HV, it compresses better, is more hydrophobic, and feels more down like. However it also has some drawbacks. #1 it is more expensive and #2 it does NOT last as long.

Have to disagree with both points. Since I have had a Primaloft sleeping bag for over ten years and a Marmot Primaloft jacket for 7 or 8 years, plus a variety of Polargard and other bags and jackets, my experience is that the Primaloft has outlasted the Polargard in terms of retaining loft after much usage and many washings. In cases where I had a choice of nominally comparable Primaloft and Polargard items (same rating for temperature), the price was pretty comparable.

Primaloft's wholesale price is higher than Polarguard 3D or HV. The only real comparison is to take the same manufacturers items and see if there is a difference. For Example Marmot's Fusion 30 sleeping bag is Polorguard and costs $169.00 while their Maverick 30 is Primaloft and costs $129.00. A $40.00 difference. This is simply the manufacturer passing along the higher cost of the insulation material to the consumer.

As far as longevity goes, Primaloft is a short staple insulation that is heat bonded into a light, warm, and compressible structure. It is these short fibers that give Primaloft its down like feel. Polarguard on the other hand is continuous-filament, resin-bonded insulation. Being a continuous insulation this is what gives Polorguard its stiff, uncompressible feel.

Short staple insulation tends to fall apart and clump over time, this has happened to several of my Primaloft items. While the long staple or continuous-filament products will hold their shape longer. This is just physics and we can't get around it. I am not putting down Primaloft again I use it in my sleeping bags due to its compressibility.

PS: What's wrong with your knee?

9:36 a.m. on March 20, 2003 (EST)
(Guest)

"For Example Marmot's Fusion 30 sleeping bag is Polorguard and costs $169.00 while their Maverick 30 is Primaloft and costs $129.00. A $40.00 difference."

Screwed that one up:

Marmot Maverick 30 is POLARGUARD and costs $129.00
Marmot Fusion 30 is PRIMALOFT and costs $169.00

8:43 p.m. on March 27, 2003 (EST)
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knee - good question

Quote:

PS: What's wrong with your knee?

Dunno how it happened, but back in the middle of January, I drove home after one of my hill hikes, got out of the car, and could hardly stand on my right leg for the pain in my knee. No twists, no falls, nothing I know of to injure it. It has flared up and calmed down several times since then. I can tele ski in the backcountry on it ok (in fact, it feels better after a day of BC tele). My regular doctor (PCP, as the insurance jargon goes) could not find anything to indicate a tear, so he gave it a couple weeks then sent me to the sports medicine ortho, who got an MRI. Nothing serious shows on the MRI, just a bit of fluid and swelling (it is much better than it was). So he gave me some exercise suggestions (including skiing and bicycling, "but don't fall"), and suggested I take a chondroitin/glucosamine combination (some specifics hidden in there). Anyway, things are much improved, and I can get a few more days of skiing in. Haven't tried climbing on it yet.

On the Primaloft/Polargard thing, I can only go on my personal experience. My Primaloft stuff seems to be holding up much better than my Polargard stuff. I would guess that there is something more involved than just the question of long vs short staple. The closest to direct comparisons I have are two sleeping bags of the same brand and two jackets of the same brand. YMMV

9:55 p.m. on March 27, 2003 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: knee - good question

My sympathies and empathies to you; I tore my ACL+ other collateral damage in climbing accident in Jan. Haven

2:29 p.m. on February 4, 2004 (EST)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Carolyn Hayes

I have to report I bought the Wild Things sweater and am VERY happy with it. It is extremely warm and light. I use a shell in weather because the ripstop is light and not water-repellant.

Did I say warm and light? This is my new under shell layer that can be wadded up real small when I start sweating.

It also has a wavy sewn padding that is quite stylish. I wear it because it looks cool. The sleeves are long and the pockets big.

Well worth the 120 retail tho I bought mine on sale. I may be getting the vest next.....

5:17 p.m. on December 6, 2004 (EST)
(Guest)

I own both the WT Belay Jacket and the Primaloft Sweater. I have used them together as a system (along with a Marmot technical Precip shell) on Rainier among many others ('bout 20 below on the summit) and they worked like a champ. Only complaint with the sweater was that it tends to ride up a bit when climbing steep technical ice and rock. I wish it was cut more with what Marmot calls "angelwing" movement to permit overhead moves without the hem of the jacket riding up. The Belay Jacket simply rocks. I usually throw it on as I near the summit of most glaciated peaks I climb. Always delivers warmth just like a "hug from momma". Hope that helps . . .

September 21, 2014
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