how to start mountaineering?

2:56 p.m. on May 30, 2004 (EDT)
(Guest)

I've just seen Touching the Void and want to start mountaineering. What is the best way to go about this? I live a 12 hour drive from the French Alps. I'm 20 years old and fit.

Thanks,

John Wooding

10:58 a.m. on June 1, 2004 (EDT)
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408 forum posts
Read and classes...

Quote:

I've just seen Touching the Void and want to start mountaineering. What is the best way to go about this? I live a 12 hour drive from the French Alps. I'm 20 years old and fit.

Find some books, read up on the how to's, find a beginner class or a club, get after it...

Good luck!

Brian in SLC

6:03 p.m. on June 4, 2004 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Read and classes...

Quote:

Find some books, read up on the how to's, find a beginner class or a club, get after it...

One book that is a "must" for anyone starting to learn about mountaineering is "Mountaineering - Freedom of the Hills". This is the "bible" of mountaineering -- it will start you off with a solid foundation. Next step: take some classes.


D. Winger
http://www.JoshuaTreeTrad.com
http://www.HighpointAdventures.com
http://www.GreatSandDunes.info

9:14 a.m. on June 7, 2004 (EDT)
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408 forum posts
BMC's Handbook of Climbing...

Quote:

One book that is a "must" for anyone starting to learn about mountaineering is "Mountaineering - Freedom of the Hills". This is the "bible" of mountaineering -- it will start you off with a solid foundation. Next step: take some classes.

Yep, its a good 'un.

Another good one, especially if you're in Europe, is the British Mountaineering Council's book "The Handbook of Climbing". Solid info. I might even prefer it on some days to MFOTH...(at the least its a good counter weight!)...

Brian in SLC

5:16 p.m. on December 17, 2004 (EST)
(Guest)

Slowly!! Make sure that you start with a solid foundation. Freedom of the hills is an excellent book to start with, and learn from people who are willing to teach a newcomer. Hopefully you noticed in touching the void that the outcome of that climb came as a result of accumulated errors. None of which in themselves were life threatening, but together caused a tragic result. They lived through a combination of luck and personal will to overcome, but it could have ended quite differently. Take courses, especially on rescue and first aid, and allow your skills to mature. Challenge yourself, but don't go nuts on a climb that you are unprepared for, or that your skillset isn't ready for. With practice, some good partners and the right equipment, climbing can be the most rewarding outdoor activity you will ever find. Good luck!!

November 27, 2014
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