Outdoor Watch Design

3:35 p.m. on August 20, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

I'm conducting some product research and want to get your thoughts and opinions to inform both form and functionality.
This forum seems to have a lot of great information and feedback and I'd really value the help.

1. What sport watch do you own and why?
2. Tell me about why you bought it?
3. What features do you use and specifically how do you use them. The more detail here the better.
4. What features or form do you not use, but think are cool and add to your enjoyment of the watch?
5. If we decided to create "The Best Watch" after reading this e-mail, what would that watch be/do? Please describe as much as possible. Remember the sky is the limit.

4:16 p.m. on August 20, 2001 (EDT)
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I'll play...

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1. What sport watch do you own and why?

Timex. Was 20 bucks. 'Bout 15 years ago.

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2. Tell me about why you bought it?

Was cheap. Good brand name.

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3. What features do you use and specifically how do you use them. The more detail here the better.

Alarm and Time/Date.

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4. What features or form do you not use, but think are cool and add to your enjoyment of the watch?

Nuttin'.

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5. If we decided to create "The Best Watch" after reading this e-mail, what would that watch be/do? Please describe as much as possible. Remember the sky is the limit.

Make breakfast, give backrub, clean house...etc etc...

Brian in SLC

4:24 p.m. on August 20, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: I'll play...

But seriously Brian...thanks for playing...if you were to really provide a lot of detail that would be soooooo helpful.
BTW, I should've asked, but what sports do you play?
Thanks, Outdoor

4:33 p.m. on August 20, 2001 (EDT)
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408 forum posts
Re: I'll play...

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But seriously Brian...thanks for playing...if you were to really provide a lot of detail that would be soooooo helpful.

Ok, meld a Kestral Wind meter model 3000, Vertech Alitide watch, and a heart rate monitor...


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BTW, I should've asked, but what sports do you play?
Thanks, Outdoor

Climb, ski, hike.

Brian in SLC

5:08 p.m. on August 20, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

You're too late

suunto vector is the perfect outdoor watch/alpine climbing watch. if you can make a smaller one that's just as accurate, kudos to you. the four day barometric log for charting trends is great.

By the way I thought that this site was supposed to be "vendor free" and non-comercial in nature.

8:28 a.m. on August 21, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Dr. Fat Boy, Fat Boy with Fat Feet, Fat Boy.com, The Fat One
Re: I'll play...

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But seriously Brian...thanks for playing...if you were to really provide a lot of detail that would be soooooo helpful.

Ok, meld a Kestral Wind meter model 3000, Vertech Alitide watch, and a heart rate monitor...


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BTW, I should've asked, but what sports do you play?
Thanks, Outdoor

Climb, ski, hike.

Brian in SLC

Hey Bri-man, don't forget, the watch needs to be accompanied by a manual that can be deciphered by non-PhD types who are not allowed to chew gum while climbing!!

9:05 a.m. on August 21, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

oh yeah....

and it would have to tell time.

10:04 a.m. on August 21, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

James bond got nothin

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1. What sport watch do you own and why?

Sunto vector, cause it can do an awful lot of cool things.

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2. Tell me about why you bought it?

Altimeter, log book for skiing and alpine climbing, compass.

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3. What features do you use and specifically how do you use them. The more detail here the better.

Alitimeter log book alot for ski touring and logging altitude mileage. Compass a bit for figuring out what aspec I am looking at if it isnt obvious.

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4. What features or form do you not use, but think are cool and add to your enjoyment of the watch?

The barometer and tracking functions, but I dont do alot of expedition style stuff, but I can see the use and it is basically the altimeter in different format

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5. If we decided to create "The Best Watch" after reading this e-mail, what would that watch be/do? Please describe as much as possible. Remember the sky is the limit.

If you wanted to take it to the next level, make it smaller. And integrate a scuba diving watch into it and hell, if the sky is the limit, integrate a gps. That would be the bomb. Tracking current alititude log book ascent and descent totals at any time,not just after you log off the log book would be nice to(I know this is a function on other sunto watches, but not the vector).


matt s

12:24 p.m. on August 21, 2001 (EDT)
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Outdoor Watch RE-Design

Quote:

1. What sport watch do you own and why?

Which one? I have several for use in different activities. Reason for different ones is if you put too many functions in, it gets to be a real pain to get the function you want when you want it.

General - they all tell time and have an alarm (mostly too quiet, but at least it's an alarm)
Timex "Ironman" - for orienteering, because it has enough "laps" to cover all the legs in a 2-day meet, plus intervals for training runs.
Avocet - for the altimeter/barometer functions, including climb or descent accumulated. Has good battery life.
Suunto Vector - for the altimeter/barometer functions (although the "sealevel" function is non-functional above 11,000 ft), including the altitude log and climb/descent accumulated (the climb/descent rate function is wildly inaccurate, unlike the Avocet). Has lousy battery life if you use anything other than just time of day, and the gasket on the "user-replaceable" battery compartment deteriorates rapidly, so water-resistance is lost after the second battery change (I've returned mine to the importer to fix this, but it will leak sweat or moderate rain). There are enough weirdities in the Suunto's performance that I usually carry either the Avocet or my ancient Thommens to crosscheck that the Suunto isn't behaving strangely again. It's good when it's working (until the battery starts dying, usually)
Polar HRM - for the heartrate functions. Polar's line is so complete, including the newer altimeter/barometer functions and computer downloadable data, that they are way ahead. I may have to get one of the new fancy ones.

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2. Tell me about why you bought it?

See comments in (1) (didn't your request for "reason to own" cover this?)

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3. What features do you use and specifically how do you use them. The more detail here the better.

See (1) (You asked for reasons in number 1). Depending on the watch, I use the features it has - read the time from the clock function, time events that need timing (like how long do you soak the freeze-dry packet - oops, need to open the packet and soak the _contents_), read the altitude from the altimeter, read the heart rate from the HRM.

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4. What features or form do you not use, but think are cool and add to your enjoyment of the watch?

If I'm not going to use the feature, I take the watch with the features I want.

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5. If we decided to create "The Best Watch" after reading this e-mail, what would that watch be/do? Please describe as much as possible. Remember the sky is the limit.

If it is electronic, it needs much longer battery life than the Suunto, or even the Avocet. Something more like the Timex (5 yrs) or even the Polar HRM (several years, depending on use).


Don't waste your time. And I disagree about integrating a GPSR into the watch (I used to work GPS professionally before I retired, and frankly, most people misunderstand and misuse GPSRs as it is. Don't give them more ways to screw up)

12:33 p.m. on August 21, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

I simply have a Timex Expedition Quartz watch that has date and time. It has stopped three times with a good battery. I have owned three other Timex watches in about as many years. They all had stopping and timekeeping problems.

They don't take a licking and don't keep on ticking and when they do, it's often not the standard 60 times/minute.

-Arms (pissed off climber/Timex owner)

1:53 p.m. on August 21, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Quote:

1. What sport watch do you own and why?

Timex Triathalon from walmart about 7 yrs ago. still ticking. cheap. stopwatch/lap counter type stuff, plus just for time.
Avocet vertic alpin. just got it fer a gift. Use mainly for altimeter and watch functions. does a bunch, but likely won't be used.

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2. Tell me about why you bought it?

Timex... cheap
Avocet... seemed better than the Suntos, IMHO

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3. What features do you use and specifically how do you use them. The more detail here the better.

Good luck making a better mouse trap on the stopwatch end. been around and hasn't changed.
The avocet has rate of climbing in feet/hr rather than feet/min like the sunto. not gonna make a blip in feet/min less I'm skiing.

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4. What features or form do you not use, but think are cool and add to your enjoyment of the watch?

I'm guessing I'll play with all the elevation log stuff for awhile. then I'll get sick of it. if they sold a watch w/out all that crap for $50 cheaper I'd get it. then they could make it smaller maybe.

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5. If we decided to create "The Best Watch" after reading this e-mail, what would that watch be/do? Please describe as much as possible. Remember the sky is the limit.

how bout one of them batman comm things that will bring my car to me when I'm sick the the hike out? Big display is good. Big fat numbers I can read when jogging (or trembling)

Hey Bill!! You don't like taking GPS into watches... how bout the altimeter in the GPS like the Garmin? Can't they rig the thing to be self-calibrating? GPS knows where it is, so I can plug in some known spots with elevations and when I get there it calibrates. Now we're talking.

Woody

2:00 p.m. on August 22, 2001 (EDT)
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Altimeter in GPS vs GPS in altimeter

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Hey Bill!! You don't like taking GPS into watches... how bout the altimeter in the GPS like the Garmin? Can't they rig the thing to be self-calibrating? GPS knows where it is, so I can plug in some known spots with elevations and when I get there it calibrates. Now we're talking.

Woody

There are 2 companies making GPSRs with barometric altimeters - Garmin and Silva/Brunton (I assume everyone knows that Silva Sweden is called Brunton in North America, having bought the old Brunton company several years back, and that "Silva" in North America is actually Johnson Worldwide Associates trademark on Suunto gear - JWA had the NA rights and has refused to give them back to Silva).

Anyway, Garmin's altimeter models (eTrex Summit and eTrex Vista, but not others in the eTrex line) do have a self-calibration function of sorts. But it is more like the Magellan pressure sensor (ColorTrak and one of their pilot's versions) in that it gives a reference point to speed up the transition to 3D mode. The Magellan units do not give an altitude or pressure readout (except through a series of secret handshakes - hold two buttons while pressing a third, then stepping through a special sequence kind of thing). There have been numerous complaints about the unreliability of the Garmin altitude and barometer numbers on rec.gps (ok, ok, it's really sci.geo.satellite-nav, but it's 99 percent newby recreational stuff plus an incredible amount of political flaming, worse than rec.climbing). The Brunton unit seems to be very good (as you would expect from Silva/Brunton), but I don't believe it has any sort of automatic calibration.

OTOH, since Selective Availability was shut off, altitude accuracy on a reasonable 3D fix is 20-30 meters 95 percent of the time (look for a DOP value less than 3, which is pretty common these days with the extra active satellites and a reasonably clear view of the sky). I have only rarely seen a deviation of more than 50 feet from a known altitude (peak on USGS map, known benchmark monument, etc), which is better than a barometric altimeter that was last calibrated several hours before at the beginning of the climb. The downside is that the GPSR and altimeter always seem to agree that I have a lot more climb ahead of me than I would like.

The two things I have against putting a GPSR into a watch with all the other functions are (1) too much clutter and too much fiddling to get to a particular function if you put too many things in the watch (I have enough annoyance with my Timex Ironman, going through time, stopwatch, countdown timer, and memo as it is), and (2) the need to educate the users in how to use the information the GPSR provides. After all, most people can't even read a trail or street map. If you go to the extent of an even more sophisticated version of the NeverLost (a Magellan product, used in Hertz rental cars), that gives you a list of places, then gives you step by step directions to get there (with a large, easy to read screen to back it up), then maybe ... But how much do you want to add to your "watch"? I think it would be far better to separate the navigation functions into a reasonably small version of the NeverLost (or smaller size version of the new Garmin V). Hmmm, when is someone going to come up with an LCD screen that folds up like a paper map? Open it to show the local area, or all the way to show the whole region, with zoom capabilities. (My opinion is that the screens on handheld GPSRs are far too small for real use as maps).

Ok, enough drivel from OGBO (aren't you sorry you asked the question?)

4:11 p.m. on August 22, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Altimeter in GPS vs GPS in altimeter

All Good Points

One more minor one if you care. GPS usually gives ellisoidal heights, which depending on your location can be different from the heights AMSL which are shown on most Topographic maps. In my neck of the woods the diff is 20m. Not a big deal, especially if you know the number to subtract or add, but gives some credibility back to the barometer.

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Hey Bill!! You don't like taking GPS into watches... how bout the altimeter in the GPS like the Garmin? Can't they rig the thing to be self-calibrating? GPS knows where it is, so I can plug in some known spots with elevations and when I get there it calibrates. Now we're talking.

Woody

There are 2 companies making GPSRs with barometric altimeters - Garmin and Silva/Brunton (I assume everyone knows that Silva Sweden is called Brunton in North America, having bought the old Brunton company several years back, and that "Silva" in North America is actually Johnson Worldwide Associates trademark on Suunto gear - JWA had the NA rights and has refused to give them back to Silva).

Anyway, Garmin's altimeter models (eTrex Summit and eTrex Vista, but not others in the eTrex line) do have a self-calibration function of sorts. But it is more like the Magellan pressure sensor (ColorTrak and one of their pilot's versions) in that it gives a reference point to speed up the transition to 3D mode. The Magellan units do not give an altitude or pressure readout (except through a series of secret handshakes - hold two buttons while pressing a third, then stepping through a special sequence kind of thing). There have been numerous complaints about the unreliability of the Garmin altitude and barometer numbers on rec.gps (ok, ok, it's really sci.geo.satellite-nav, but it's 99 percent newby recreational stuff plus an incredible amount of political flaming, worse than rec.climbing). The Brunton unit seems to be very good (as you would expect from Silva/Brunton), but I don't believe it has any sort of automatic calibration.

OTOH, since Selective Availability was shut off, altitude accuracy on a reasonable 3D fix is 20-30 meters 95 percent of the time (look for a DOP value less than 3, which is pretty common these days with the extra active satellites and a reasonably clear view of the sky). I have only rarely seen a deviation of more than 50 feet from a known altitude (peak on USGS map, known benchmark monument, etc), which is better than a barometric altimeter that was last calibrated several hours before at the beginning of the climb. The downside is that the GPSR and altimeter always seem to agree that I have a lot more climb ahead of me than I would like.

The two things I have against putting a GPSR into a watch with all the other functions are (1) too much clutter and too much fiddling to get to a particular function if you put too many things in the watch (I have enough annoyance with my Timex Ironman, going through time, stopwatch, countdown timer, and memo as it is), and (2) the need to educate the users in how to use the information the GPSR provides. After all, most people can't even read a trail or street map. If you go to the extent of an even more sophisticated version of the NeverLost (a Magellan product, used in Hertz rental cars), that gives you a list of places, then gives you step by step directions to get there (with a large, easy to read screen to back it up), then maybe ... But how much do you want to add to your "watch"? I think it would be far better to separate the navigation functions into a reasonably small version of the NeverLost (or smaller size version of the new Garmin V). Hmmm, when is someone going to come up with an LCD screen that folds up like a paper map? Open it to show the local area, or all the way to show the whole region, with zoom capabilities. (My opinion is that the screens on handheld GPSRs are far too small for real use as maps).

Ok, enough drivel from OGBO (aren't you sorry you asked the question?)

8:34 p.m. on August 22, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Don M, Don Morris, hikerdon

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1. What sport watch do you own and why? I have a Casio DW-290, something in the vicinity of 8 years old.
2. Tell me about why you bought it? I wanted the 200M water resistant rating for scuba diving, and the stopwatch and countdown features for a variety of other outdoor uses
3. What features do you use and specifically how do you use them. I find the waater resistance helpful - I don't worry about the watch when kayaking, diving, etc. (although in the last few years my dive computer has practically replaced the watch for diving). The stopwatch and countdown functions are really useful in a variety of ways - everything from timing cooking intervals to figuring my cadence on the bicycle. The alarm has been used occasionally, but not routinely - I agree with others that it could be louder - how about some means of controling the sound volume on this function?
4. What features or form do you not use, but think are cool and add to your enjoyment of the watch? I don't understand this question - how can a feature that I don't use affect my enjoyment of the watch?
5. If we decided to create "The Best Watch" after reading this e-mail, what would that watch be/do?

If anything, make it smaller and cheaper. Maintain durability. I would not vote for hooking on additional, more complex functions like GPS or HRM (When I use GPS, I like a lot of storage for data, because I have specific needs in mind. I much prefer a traditional, non battery compass to a more complex electronic item, for instance).
KISS!

A reliable, durable watch band that would last as long as the battery does in my Casio would be really neat. I think I am on my third band and I only recently replaced the first set of batteries. Keep the price down. Consider a modular line with the basic watch I prefer selling nice and cheap. Add on the gadgets, price, weight, bulk,etc. for those who want more toys on their wrist.

I am interested in the comments about the altimeter function of the Garmin ETrex in this thread. I have been very impressed with the accuracy of my unit since SA was disabled. Certainly it is accurate enough for recreational route finding. I am usually within five feet of so of known benchmarks.

8:16 a.m. on August 23, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Timexs' response

I sent my post to Timex. They apologised and sent me a whole bunch of warranty info. Really, they didn't seem to care that much.

-Arms

12:54 p.m. on August 23, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Reply: Outdoor Watch Design

Quote:

1. What sport watch do you own and why?

>>Two Timex digital watches - IronMan and Expedition...both get used for outdoor pursuits (hiking, climbing, mountaineering, etc) and as my Scuba watch. I dive in third-world locations and do not want to wear a several hundred dollar watch. I can bring two Ironman's and am covered for the trip.

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2. Tell me about why you bought it?

>>Price of the two make them seem like they are disposable....I don't have to be worried about losing them, like I would with my Swiss Military watch.

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3. What features do you use and specifically how do you use them. The more detail here the better.

>>Alarm clock function - but they need to be louder, lap chrono for multi-level diving, indigo night light for ease of viewing, dual time zone features are nice too - helps to communicate with my family who live at distant locations.
Calendar function is essential.

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4. What features or form do you not use, but think are cool and add to your enjoyment of the watch?

>>24hr vs 12hr clock...don't use military time much these days
>>don't need to have an hourly chime function.
prefer to have a velcro type sport strap.

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5. If we decided to create "The Best Watch" after reading this e-mail, what would that watch be/do? Please describe as much as possible. Remember the sky is the limit.

>>For my needs:
-I want a watch that is Waterproof to at least 50m (one that can actually withstand diving at 130ft- not just says that it can)
- must have a common type of watch battery
- must have a night-time viewing gadget (light, indiglo, phosphoresence, etc.)
- must be reasonable priced so that when I lose it, I'm not out several hundred bucks.
- don't need all kinds of bells and whistles such as Altimeters, etc....I have real altimeters and dive computers to rely on instead.
- must be able to operate at cold temperatures that reach minus 40 Celcius (this MUST be the case)
- should have a resonable robust face (I hate scratches)
- should be able to withstand getting beat-up and not cared for....ie, make it tough.
- don't make it too big. Some of the watches are too huge...

Enjoy,
Diligence

8:53 p.m. on August 23, 2001 (EDT)
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Almost, but not quite

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One more minor one if you care. GPS usually gives ellisoidal heights, which depending on your location can be different from the heights AMSL which are shown on most Topographic maps.

Garmin, Magellan, Trimble, and Lowrance all use tables of geoidal deviation from the ellipsoid. So they are closer to MSL than your comment implies. However, different datums use different ellipsoids, which actually makes more of a difference than the geoidal deviation. Which simply says, be sure your GPSR is set to the same datum as the map.

12:56 p.m. on August 27, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: You're too late

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suunto vector is the perfect outdoor watch/alpine climbing watch. if you can make a smaller one that's just as accurate, kudos to you. the four day barometric log for charting trends is great.

By the way I thought that this site was supposed to be "vendor free" and non-comercial in nature.

Ian, you are right--this site should remain vendor free, and I'm not selling anything--just wanting to make sure that I'm designing for the people who actually use sport watches and thought this would be a good place to get some feedback. besides, many people enjoy answering questions about their gear as it can help others make helpful decisions. I am, however sorry if this feels too commercial and promise not to post new questions. Thanks for your feedback.

6:51 a.m. on August 29, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

here's one

Here's an idea. How bout some kind of lap counter type thing for altitude and time. my watch may do this and I don't know it yet, but would be cool to hit a memory button that records the time and altitude. that way I can look back and say at 10am I was at this point. summit at 11.30... and so on.

Woody

1:01 p.m. on August 29, 2001 (EDT)
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Re: here's one

Woody,

The Suunto altimeters do this, sort of, by using the log function. You set the interval for 1 minute (needed to get any sort of reasonable accuracy in the accumulated climb/descent anyway, without overloading the memory like the shorter intervals do). Rest stops are very apparent as several minutes at a single altitude (within 10-20 feet, since there are fluctuations due to the atmosphere), and most people spend 10-15 minutes at the summit. Or you can just stop the log at the summit and start a new one when descending.

One problem with this is that using the recording functions shortens the battery life tremendously. In fact, Suunto's stated 18 month battery life turns out to be only if you stay in the basic watch mode without using alarms, compass, altitude/barometer functions, heart-rate functions, or any of those other things you got the Suunto for rather than a basic Timex digital watch. I've never gotten more than 6 months from mine, and the self-replacement wears out the battery compartment gasket (not water-resistant after the 2nd or 3rd replacement) and the slot in the cover. Suunto is supposed to offer a full replacement kit with cover and gasket, as well as the battery, to deal with this problem, but I haven't seen one yet.

10:07 p.m. on September 2, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

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1. What sport watch do you own and why?

Don't know brand. Cheap.

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2. Tell me about why you bought it?

Cheap, waterproof, with alarm.

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3. What features do you use and specifically how do you use them. The more detail here the better.

Time. Date. Waterproof (for canyoning). Cheap is feature because when it gets smashed against a rock I don't break down blubbering (like happened with the last couple). Alarm when getting an early start.

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4. What features or form do you not use, but think are cool and add to your enjoyment of the watch?

none

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5. If we decided to create "The Best Watch" after reading this e-mail, what would that watch be/do? Please describe as much as possible. Remember the sky is the limit.

Simple to use, cheap and (as others have said) _with a loud alarm_.

6:54 p.m. on September 7, 2001 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Dennis, The Original Dennis, Dennis Roscetti

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1. What sport watch do you own and why?

Timex Ironman. Cheap, reasonably waterproof, features I use, love the Indiglo lighting
Avocet Vertech Alpin. Smallest altimeter I'd seen when I bought it.

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2. Tell me about why you bought it?
See 1.

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3. What features do you use and specifically how do you use them. The more detail here the better.

On the Timex, almost everything at one time or another. Day/Date/time pretty much everyday. Countup timer for elapsed time point-to-point. countdown timer cooking, purifying water. Alarm because I'd sleep 'til noon without it.
On the Avocet, pretty much the altimeter and barometer functions. I sometimes remember to set the barometric trend feature. I seldom rely on this one for time, day/date, temperature, vertical feet gained or lost.

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4. What features or form do you not use, but think are cool and add to your enjoyment of the watch?
None. If I don't use it it might as well not be there.

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5. If we decided to create "The Best Watch" after reading this e-mail, what would that watch be/do? Please describe as much as possible. Remember the sky is the limit.

I'll keep it simple. An altimeter watch as accurate as the Avocet, but with the Indiglo light feature. I'd noever take the Vertech by itself because once it's dark I have to fish for a headlamp to see the damned thing. Reasonably water-resistant; not dive watch water resistant, but rain, snow, water immersion shouldn't faze it. In an ideal world it would be easier to use than the Avocet. This is however a tradeoff for features; the more the unit can do the more controls are required. I'd settle for an accurate altimeter that cost less than $100. Altitude (feet or meters)barometric pressure, maybe trend. That's it. I'll wear it around my neck, and the Timex can be out there on my wrist for the rest. When I break the Timex I won't feel bad about it.

5:28 a.m. on December 9, 2001 (EST)
Re: Outdoor Watch RE-Design

Quote:

Quote:

1. What sport watch do you own and why?

Which one? I have several for use in different activities. Reason for different ones is if you put too many functions in, it gets to be a real pain to get the function you want when you want it.

General - they all tell time and have an alarm (mostly too quiet, but at least it's an alarm)
Timex "Ironman" - for orienteering, because it has enough "laps" to cover all the legs in a 2-day meet, plus intervals for training runs.
Avocet - for the altimeter/barometer functions, including climb or descent accumulated. Has good battery life.
Suunto Vector - for the altimeter/barometer functions (although the "sealevel" function is non-functional above 11,000 ft), including the altitude log and climb/descent accumulated (the climb/descent rate function is wildly inaccurate, unlike the Avocet). Has lousy battery life if you use anything other than just time of day, and the gasket on the "user-replaceable" battery compartment deteriorates rapidly, so water-resistance is lost after the second battery change (I've returned mine to the importer to fix this, but it will leak sweat or moderate rainmstarts dying, usually)
Polar HRM - for the heartrate functions. Polar's line is so complete, including the newer altimeter/barometer functions and computer downloadable data, that they are way ahead. I may have to get one of the new fancy ones.

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2. Tell me about why you bought it?

See comments in (1) (didn't your request for "reason to own" cover this?)

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3. What features do you use and specifically how do you use them. The more detail here the better.

See (1) (You asked for reasons in number 1). Depending on the watch, I use the features it has - read the time from the clock function, time events that need timing (like how long do you soak the freeze-dry packet - oops, need to open the packet and soak the _contents_), read the altitude from the altimeter, read the heart rate from the HRM.

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4. What features or form do you not use, but think are cool and add to your enjoyment of the watch?

If I'm not going to use the feature, I take the watch with the features I want.

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5. If we decided to create "The Best Watch" after reading this e-mail, what would that watch be/do? Please describe as much as possible. Remember the sky is the limit.

If it is electronic, it needs much longer battery life than the Suunto, or even the Avocet. Something more like the Timex (5 yrs) or even the Polar HRM (several years, depending on use).


Don't waste your time. And I disagree about integrating a GPSR into the watch (I used to work GPS professionally before I retired, and frankly, most people misunderstand and misuse GPSRs as it is. Don't give them more ways to screw up)

July 12, 2014
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