Stretching (before and after)

7:06 a.m. on April 6, 2011 (EDT)
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I was just wondering if any body has a stretching routine before and/or after climbing, and if so what stretches you do.  There are a few leg stretches that I started doing, but there might be more effective stretches out there.

11:17 a.m. on April 6, 2011 (EDT)
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From what I understand, there is a difference between static streches and dynamic stretches.

Static stretches, just sitting and pulling on limbs and reaching is pointless, especially when you're cold and not warmed up at all.

Dynamic stretches are a small warm up activity that gets the muscles warm and moving before the exercise you will engage in, and this is the best method.

Before you do the hike, do some light lunging, walking, and move and twist your body to warm up muscles, joints, ligaments, and more.

This info came from my co-worker sitting next to me who is a personal trainer and an OT.

5:14 p.m. on April 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Thank's for the info iClimb.  I was looking for some more specific suggestions ... and also that are specific to climbing.

6:25 p.m. on April 6, 2011 (EDT)
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What is the purpose of your stretching, to warm up or increase flexibility?

Stretching for range of movement is best done with warmed muscles, such as after exercising.  Warming up prior to strenuous exercise is not limited to stretching, it can be done several ways; jogging, jumping jacks, "dynamic stretches", etc.

Ed

9:43 p.m. on April 6, 2011 (EDT)
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I tried to give some specifics. Here are a few more: as you get to your climbing site, park, and walk around, do some lunges, lift your knees to your chest and then rotate them out, do some toe raises, a few body weight squats, arm rotations, torso twists, neck rolls, toe touches, etc.

 

All of those will be movements that will warm up the muscles in the back, legs, arms, shoulders, and neck, which are all needed for climbing and hiking.

 

 

Ed - any "warm ups" are dynamic stretches. Static stretches are the way most people think of stretching - just reaching and stretching limbs around into painful positions thinking it loosens the muscle. But it actually breaks the muscle down, and doesn't really warm up anything, especially if you aren't warmed up already.

 

Flexibility is limited by muscle. The more muscular you are, the less flexible you are. Therefore, becoming flexible is actually you breaking down the muscle tissue as you "stretch" the particular body part. That might be fine depending on what you are doing, but most people want to keep that strength and muscle tone, not get rid of it. Using this logic, it's easy to understand the type of abuse a gymnast's body goes through. They need strength and muscle, but they need flexibility. It's a push/pull of both.

5:53 a.m. on April 7, 2011 (EDT)
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133 forum posts

What is the purpose of your stretching, to warm up or increase flexibility?

Stretching for range of movement is best done with warmed muscles, such as after exercising.  Warming up prior to strenuous exercise is not limited to stretching, it can be done several ways; jogging, jumping jacks, "dynamic stretches", etc.

Ed

Mainly to increase flexibility.

5:59 a.m. on April 7, 2011 (EDT)
12 reviewer rep
133 forum posts

I tried to give some specifics. Here are a few more: as you get to your climbing site, park, and walk around, do some lunges, lift your knees to your chest and then rotate them out, do some toe raises, a few body weight squats, arm rotations, torso twists, neck rolls, toe touches, etc.

 

All of those will be movements that will warm up the muscles in the back, legs, arms, shoulders, and neck, which are all needed for climbing and hiking.

 

 

Ed - any "warm ups" are dynamic stretches. Static stretches are the way most people think of stretching - just reaching and stretching limbs around into painful positions thinking it loosens the muscle. But it actually breaks the muscle down, and doesn't really warm up anything, especially if you aren't warmed up already.

 

Flexibility is limited by muscle. The more muscular you are, the less flexible you are. Therefore, becoming flexible is actually you breaking down the muscle tissue as you "stretch" the particular body part. That might be fine depending on what you are doing, but most people want to keep that strength and muscle tone, not get rid of it. Using this logic, it's easy to understand the type of abuse a gymnast's body goes through. They need strength and muscle, but they need flexibility. It's a push/pull of both.

Thanks for the info iClimb.  I guess I hadn't been specific enough.  The stretching is more for flexibility.  I understand what you mean about warming up vs. stretching.  I also like to include stretching into a cool down routine after climbing ... I seem to remember reading somewhere that stretching afterwards help to keep flexibility (although I could be completely wrong).

6:38 a.m. on April 7, 2011 (EDT)
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for pure flexibility needs, you have to do the typical sit and reach routine.

 

9:09 a.m. on April 7, 2011 (EDT)
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2,276 forum posts

...I seem to remember reading somewhere that stretching afterwards help to keep flexibility (although I could be completely wrong).

Actually you are correct, stretching after exercise gets the best results, regarding flexibility.

Ed

12:15 p.m. on April 8, 2011 (EDT)
171 reviewer rep
223 forum posts

Yoga and pilates.

July 22, 2014
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