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Outdoor Retailer: Exploring OR (Part 2)

9:08 p.m. on August 6, 2010 (EDT)
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This thread is for comments on the article "Outdoor Retailer: Exploring OR (Part 2)"

The third day of Outdoor Retailer included breakfast with the Conservation Alliance and visits to Easton, Hilleberg, Leki, injini, Polar, and Bluewater for contributor Bill Straka.

Full article at http://www.trailspace.com/blog/2010/08/06/bills-or-day-3.html

12:14 a.m. on August 7, 2010 (EDT)
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Re: Outdoor Retailer: Bill explores OR (Part 2)

Thanks Bill.

It was good to see you and to meet your wife at OR.

Have a safe trip home.

Chris

12:46 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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Re: Outdoor Retailer: Bill explores OR (Part 2)

(repeats to self)

"I will own a Hilleberg someday. I will own a Hilleberg someday. I will own a Hilleberge someday..."

12:51 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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Re: Outdoor Retailer: Bill explores OR (Part 2)

Bill,

Do those changes in the standards primarily relate to the technical functions, specifications, and limits of the rope? Or do they also concern the methods of testing for those specifications and limits?

I am not currently involved in vertical rope work on anything more than a personal recreational level, but I am always interested to know of changes like these.

Thanks for your OR reports

12:58 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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Re: Outdoor Retailer: Bill explores OR (Part 2)

I really like the ides of the camera mount on top of a hiking pole. I've often considered tapping one or mine or drilling it out and dropping in some like this coupling nut.

Slightly blown away by the Hilleberg Saitaris. Would be interested to see what type of stakes they are using in their "real world" testing and in hearing if they've setup the tent in those wind speeds.

All in all great reporting and a big tahnsk to trailspace for getting so much OR info out to the masses.

2:31 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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Re: Outdoor Retailer: Bill explores OR (Part 2)

gonzan,

The standards are continuously being updated, particularly the testing methods. There is an attempt to make the testing methods more relevant to real-life usage. For example, years ago only the static breaking strength was measured. When it was realized that in a climbing fall, the stretch of the rope absorbs the energy of the fall, a limit on the maximum force (due to the elasticity) was added. Since ropes used on big walls may be subjected to multiple falls, specifications on number of falls held before failure were added, as well as specifying that the fall would be over a rod the diameter of a carabiner (and, this meant that carabiner bend radius has become a standard). Because climbing ropes are sometimes used as a single rope, or a double rope (both strands together through all pro), or twin (two strands through alternating pro), specifications developed for the different usages, along with testing methods.

The specifications and limits have been modified as well, with new abrasion specifications and heat/fire resistance (lots of heating when rappelling long distances - the old 11mm ropes had more surface area that the new 9mm ropes, although both may meet the single rope specs for force limit and number of falls).

The NFPA ratings are new, at least to the climbing world, with the result that ropes will now come with 3 sets of specifications and labelling. Work remains on the question of specs for falls over sharp edges.

4:39 p.m. on August 12, 2010 (EDT)
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Re: Outdoor Retailer: Bill explores OR (Part 2)

Thanks Bill,

Being that I live in the heart of the TAG region, regarded as the caving mecca of the world, I have been involved in caving on and off over the years. So I am familiar with North American Rope Techniques and topics as they apply to private recreational activities. But I am by no means well versed or up to date on the recent changes to those standards, as they more directly effect SAR, commercial, and organized recreational groups.

I hold very high standards of safety and proficiency for myself, but I am not active enough in the vertical rope communities to keep abreast of all the changes and advancements.

Acquiring proper training and certification in vertical rescue is something that I would like to do someday. I have been very fortunate to live in the same town as Bruce Smith and have access to his knowledge and OnRope1- he is a remarkable fellow. So if my life does allow me to get more serious and go for certification, I couldn't ask for a better place to get it.

7:54 p.m. on September 15, 2010 (EDT)
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Re: Outdoor Retailer: Bill explores OR (Part 2)

(repeats to self)

"I will own a Hilleberg someday. I will own a Hilleberg someday. I will own a Hilleberge someday..."

I actually told Petra (Hilleberg) at OR that that's exactly what a lot of our members say about Hilleberg tents.

April 17, 2014
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