Cold: Climbing Gasherbrum II in winter

3:06 p.m. on June 17, 2011 (EDT)
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This thread is for comments on the article "Cold: Climbing Gasherbrum II in winter"

On February 2, 2011, Simone Moro, Denis Urubko, and Cory Richards became the first to climb one of Pakistan's 8,000 meter peaks in winter, Gasherbrum II. Richards, now the only American to summit any 8,000 meter peak in winter, did so while carrying a camera and filming the whole climb (avalanches, crevasses, whiteouts, and more). The result is the raw, 19-minute Cold, which recently won Best Adve...

Full article at http://www.trailspace.com/blog/2011/06/17/cold.html

8:42 p.m. on June 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Ok, I really want to see this.

5:45 p.m. on June 18, 2011 (EDT)
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fantastic, 

insane,

but fantastic.

12:30 a.m. on June 19, 2011 (EDT)
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F-bomb!!!!

The clip brought back memories of my winter climb of Denali, the hardest thing I sever did.  My feet and hands have gone sympathetically numb, and my stomach tied in knots.  Few documentaries succeed in conveying the mindscape of such climbs, but this brief preview was very effective, provoking a flashback, recalling the nonstop cold, dread, latent fear – sometimes outright and overwhelming - that is never far out of mind, when one attempts to pit themselves against such piles of rock, ice, and cold in the deep of winter.   When you view this, remember this is probably what their day to day was like for a month or more.

Please let us know when it is released.

Ed

 

 

8:21 a.m. on July 19, 2011 (EDT)
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wow so beautiful

10:18 a.m. on July 19, 2011 (EDT)
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Ed, you climbed Denali in winter.  WOW! I am impressed.

2:17 p.m. on July 19, 2011 (EDT)
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MORE SNOW WITH ME NOT IN IT?  Now I'm really beginning to feel like crap.  Then again, "Weeping In The Snow" about says it all.  Thank God there are still places on the Planet where humans can get their arses handed to them on a regular basis.  When we accept Miss Nature as our personal lord and savior, well, we have to live in the cathedral without complaint or otherwise go home and sit on the couch.  These guys are the luckiest men alive since they get to sleep with the most beautiful woman in the world.

9:51 p.m. on July 19, 2011 (EDT)
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alan said:

Ed, you climbed Denali in winter.  WOW! I am impressed.

6:22 a.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
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alan said:

Ed, you climbed Denali in winter.  WOW! I am impressed.

I love my fan club!

Actually I unintentionally overstated this project.  Less than twenty people from about a dozen teams have accomplished a winter summit of Denali.  I am not in that group.  Our winter climb fell significantly short; high winds blowing out of Denali Pass barred further progress beyond the 17200’ camp.

The only thing today I am truly impressed about that trip is the depth of our youthful ignorance and hubris, engaging in escapades that miraculously didn't kill us.  Think too much testosterone, too much free time and too little wisdom.  But do not be impressed.  There is nothing impressive or gratifying about surviving a session of Russian roulette with a giant, temperamental, ice box; it is mostly luck, and about as enjoyable as a five week long full-body ice cream headache.  I should have stayed home and gone night clubbing for a few more notches in the bed post.  At least those stories are more entertaining. 

On hindsight I am surprised the NPS actually let our group go.  Two of us had one trip apiece on Denali, and I had the only successful summit; none of us had any other 6K meter experience, or prior winter Alaskan experience.  We owe our lives to Bradford Washburn.  Bradford provided us a plethora of information about the mountain, and recommended we have a chat with Ray Genet, member of the team that made the first winter ascent of Denali.  We had no intention of availing ourselves to his guide service, nor did he pitch his services for this trip; nevertheless Ray related his many experiences with Denali.  Most memorable was a photo Ray shared of him clinging to a rope while his body fluttered in the wind like a flag.  Ray's conversation along with Brad’s cautionary advice, encouraged (scared) us into scaling back our ambitions.  We originally wanted to repeat the 1982 Mears, Young and Waterman winter ascent of the Cassin Route, but decided the more sundry W. Buttress was more than enough of a challenge for our group.  No doubt if the mountain winds pinned us down on the W. Buttress route, the wind would have literally blown us off the exposed lines of the Cassin route.

Had it not been for the weather, a winter ascent of the West Buttress would be a fool's walk up a very high but not very technical tourist route, only done at the wrong time of the year, accompanied by much discomfort. (Hey my travel agent pitched an off season discount I couldn’t resist.)

Ed

10:58 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
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Impressive none the less.  I read -148 a very long time ago.

December 17, 2014
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