Scotchgard as a DWR

11:34 p.m. on October 17, 2008 (EDT)
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Several of my friends keep telling me that scotchgard can be used on synthetics as/in place of a DWR.
I do know that scotchgard is a fluorocarbon and not a silicone.

I am just reluctant to heed this source of advise since it is the same source that advised I place my wet clothes and boots in my sleeping bag with me so they would dry faster.

Any thoughts on scotchgard?

Thanks.

9:19 p.m. on October 19, 2008 (EDT)
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Scotchgard was developed for use in manufacture and maintenance of furniture and carpets, hence the blanket advice that it is "good" for stain resistance on "any" synthetic. I believe that it is (was?) the propellant that is the fluorocarbon (freon), not the Scotchgard itself, though I haven't looked at the ingredient list since I started avoiding all organic volatiles (our new house will have no VOCs or formaldehyde in the construction materials, and all carpets are hand-woven).

My advice would be to use one of the DWR treatments that is purpose-made for outdoor clothing, as discussed in several other threads.

10:13 p.m. on October 19, 2008 (EDT)
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Thanks Bill,
That was my gut instinct, to use the purpose made stuff.
Sometimes these products overlap from industry to industry and can be purchased cheaper in a different market.

I try to use enviro-friendly products as well.
So far I have used Nikwax spray on.

Sounds like you are building green, at least to some degree.
The last home I worked on had recycled glass beads for a driveway (as opposed to gravel) several different colors too.
We can't meet the drainage requirements for green building around here with concrete drives so we have to use something porous.

12:34 a.m. on October 20, 2008 (EDT)
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We can't meet the drainage requirements for green building around here with concrete drives so we have to use something porous.

The Peoples Republic of Palo Alto has a similar requirement for porous drives. The house itself obviously is non-porous. They are also "encouraging" putting barrels on all the downspouts for the gutters. That's to save the rainwater for irrigation, since we are frequently in drought status. At the same time, we are in a federal-designated flood zone. So we have had to raise the floor level about 2 feet.

9:41 a.m. on October 20, 2008 (EDT)
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HaHa, The peoples Republic,.....we have one of those too!

Raising the floor level is not cheap is it?
A lot of that takes place here with older homes that are being renovated and don't meet the newer flood plane height.
Our 100 yr. flood plane is about 14' above sea level (ASL)depending on where you are, and that means the houses on the beach front are about 12 ft' off the ground on pilings.

The article I read (possibly not a good source) says that Scotchgard uses a fluorocarbon, while sprays containing silicone use a hydrocarbon, and that 3M has reformulated Scotchgard and is putting it back on the market. My first post was not very explanatory, but I plan on using a purpose made product anyway so I guess it's mute.

Good luck with the house, I understand what you are going through, both your patience and checkbook get thin, don't they.

7:10 p.m. on October 20, 2008 (EDT)
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Patience? WHAT PATIENCE? (snarrrrlllll!!!)

September 19, 2014
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