Boot stitching, do you protect it?

8:19 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I was wondering if anyone out there used an epoxy or any type of stitch protector on the sewn seams of their boots?  I have in the past and find myself considering it on my latest purchase.

Have you done this?  If so what did you use?  What kind of results have you had in the long run?  What kind of problems have you encountered?  For that matter what else can ya add to this practice...  Any suggestions, etc?

Here in Pa. we have an over abundance of rocks.  For those who encounter this type of terrain I personally think it is a valuable practice of preventive maintenance to extend the lifespan of your footwear and should be considered but is often over looked.

Boots aren't cheap, why not do everything you can to maintain the structural integrity of one of the most important pieces of gear you use?

Trailspace members, what do you think?

8:46 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Hmmm ....

You could be right.

I HAVE done something like you describe to a pair of boots I used semi-regularly, some years ago.   They were not the high $$ FGL's, but, rather a decent boot -- the L.L. Bean Gore-Tex (oh, NO !) "Cresta Hikers", at about $150 / pair.   I got two pairs -- one is the fabric / leather version ... the other, the all-leather.  Made in ITALIA !

I "cheated", though.   I noticed some stitching on the fabric / leather  pair (Summer / warm weather boots) was fraying.   I put one, tiny drop of "Crazy-Glue" / (or) "Super-Glue", on the fraying thread.  BINGO !  No problem-0.

I have since done the same 'ole trick, using clear nair-polish.   Works.  Probably less harmful to the leather, also.

I know this is not pro-active ... but, "reactive".   Still ..."Necessity is a Mother".

                                             ~r2~

9:11 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I don't do anything special.  Most of my travels are in the mountains of western United States, hence rugged trails and sharp rocks are always in the mix.  I have never had anything approaching a significant stitch failure occur while trekking.  But If my boots gets too beat up, I take them to the cobbler afterwards for a tune up.

Ed

10:26 p.m. on July 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Here is Pa. we have an "abundance" of sandstone. This stuff will wreck a pair of boots. Hence the nickname "Rocksylvania." Sandstone and boot stitching does not work well together.

Its also one of the reasons why I am so fond of all leather boots. The less pieces of leather/stitching the better, and the sandstone can also do some serious damage to synthetics.

 

7:09 a.m. on July 19, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Here is Pa. we have an "abundance" of sandstone. This stuff will wreck a pair of boots. Hence the nickname "Rocksylvania." Sandstone and boot stitching does not work well together.

Its also one of the reasons why I am so fond of all leather boots. The less pieces of leather/stitching the better, and the sandstone can also do some serious damage to synthetics.

 

 I guess that's why rands make a lot of sense.

I really don't care for the way a rand 'boogers up' the original configuration of expensive FGL ( Holy Acronym,  Batman!)  boots.   Hard to remove, also, if you have rands put on them.

Probably a wise choice would be to use lesser-boots;  those that one does not 'fret' over.

I have come to appreciate the uniqueness and value of my Itailian FGL boots.  I am now rather selective where I hike with them.   Anyhow, I have other, not-so-valuable boots I can use ... and, not worry about them.   They do a reasonably good job in protecting my feet and ankles; albeit, at lesser comfort levels.

I've had good success with military-issue "combat" and "jungle" boots (for warm weather hiking), when in terrain that "eats" boots.   I have weak ankles, and they do a good job of supporting the ankle-area.  I like the full-lace versions.   For the cost outlay, they are a good value.   Easily replaced.   I've actually worn-out a couple pairs.  Used 'em on construction job-sites, also.

                                               ~r2~

9:54 a.m. on July 19, 2011 (EDT)
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Shoe goo or a similar product like McNett works good.  I use it to make a waterproof and scuff proof toe cover on my work boots.  I haven't used it on recreational boots but it ought to work fine. 

11:13 a.m. on July 19, 2011 (EDT)
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I use a product called Shoe Goo. It is a rubberlike material that will waterproof and protect stitching from abrasion. It lasts a long time and can be easily reapplied as needed.

12:53 p.m. on July 19, 2011 (EDT)
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Robert Rowe said:

 Probably a wise choice would be to use lesser-boots;  those that one does not 'fret' over.                                              

 Yeah, the lesser boot logic would be ok but alot of them can meet their dimise rather quickly not too mention I did my last trip in a pair of $160 boots and my feet were soaked the whole way. I thought by day 4 I was stepping into the beginning stages of trench foot. It sucked. I completed the whole trail with feet that looked as though they frequented a buthchers block on a regular basis.

Kinda funny. I can see spots on my feet now that are still healing.

It was quite painful at times but I knew stopping wasn't gonna get me to where I needed to be. I swapped out socks quite often, and went through ALOT of moleskin.

12:57 p.m. on July 19, 2011 (EDT)
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1:02 p.m. on July 19, 2011 (EDT)
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I have also been looking into this as well:

http://workingperson.com/footwear-1/waterproofing-conditioner/tuff-toe-96102blk-tuff-toe-pro-black-liquid-footwear-protection.html#reviews

I still have yet to hear from Dave Page in regards to adding a rand to my Scarpas. I am going to hold out until I hear back from him.

1:44 a.m. on July 27, 2011 (EDT)
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wax or oil even chapstick

also try shoe goo

3:14 p.m. on July 27, 2011 (EDT)
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Callahan said:

wax or oil even chapstick

also try shoe goo

 I am with ya on the application of shoe goo, the wax & chapstick wouldn't do much to protect against sandstone.

August 29, 2014
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