Sole separtion of my Lowa's ... how to repair ?

4:11 p.m. on August 6, 2011 (EDT)
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I recently retrieved a bunch of my 'stuff' from a rented storage-facility, where it has been for a couple years, following a divorce.

A 'casualty' of the storage in two Summers of brutal heat, are an almost new pair of Lowa "Tempest Lo" hiking shoes.

I wore them a couple times this past week, for some 'urban exploration'.

Sadly, the glued-on Lowa (not Vibram) proprietary sole is starting to separate around the toe-rand when striding.   No other damage, other than the early separation process.

Before I take the shoes to a cobbler -- who is ONE BLOCK away from me, I was wondering  (?) what any of you may have used to repair a similar sole-separation.   I showed the shoes to my leather-craftman buddy this morning.   He says there is a specific glue for this, but he does not do this kind of repair.

The reason I DID NOT (yet) go to the cobbler ... is that he does not have long-term experience.   The owner and his brother/partner both recently died, and the shop closed for a  while.

This fellow was an apprentice, and bought out the widow's interest in the shop and the equipment.   He only recently hung-out his shingle for doing shoe repair on his own.  

As this is not a major repair on an expensive pair of FGL boots, I don't think I would have a problem there.

I was just wondering if anyone here has done this type of repair themselves, with any degree of success.

                                                  ~r2~

4:23 p.m. on August 6, 2011 (EDT)
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You could try 'Shoe Goo' Robert, I have also used Lexel sealant with very good success. Lexel is a rubber based high adhesion waterproof sealant that comes in caulking tubes as well as squeeze tubes and is available from hardware stores and home centers. Lexel is much, much better than even the best silicones.

I do not know what shoe manufacturers use, I wish I did, maybe someone can tell us.

4:36 p.m. on August 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Try barge cement. Quite a few cobblers use it from the feedback I received. 

http://www.amazon.com/BARGE-DA081-Barge-Cement/dp/B002JL2ZHE 

Now there are materials Barge cement will not stick too such as oil or chem resistant sole, or natural gum rubber. 

From a bit of research this is what I have found to work in situation that use these type of materials.

Renia Ortek glue + the appropriate Renia Primer. Here is a link:

http://www.atlasortho.com/catalog/search/products/Glues+%26+Abrasives/Cements/Renia+Cements

Hope this helps ya out R2. IMHO the Barge Cement should do the trick for ya. 

8:40 a.m. on August 7, 2011 (EDT)
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Thanks, Mike and Rick ~

I have used the Lexel in  EPDM roof work, Mike.  Might still have a tube or two around.   I didn't think of that.   Good tip.

Rick - the Barge cement is good for many, many applications ... especially as you have recommended.

I need to get some and have it available.

The Renia stuff looks like professional material, but comes in bulk quantities.

All-in-all, acquiring both of these products will be wise.   Probably equal to the charge I would incur at the cobbler's.  

                                                   ~r2~

12:42 p.m. on August 7, 2011 (EDT)
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Robert,

On a side note, I have had several pairs of fairly expensive boots suffer from separation of glued joints. Sometimes this was toe rands or rands that wrapped the side of the boot, sometimes it was soles that let lose.

These problems can be field repaired if caught early AND you have the right glue with you, or repaired by a cobbler of course, but I find the problem irritating to no end and I finally just started (4 years ago) using simple old school FGL boots with a sewn on Vibram sole.

So far problem solved. A $200 or $300 dollar boot should not come apart in my opinion and I think the mechanical attachment provided by stitching the sole on holds better than gluing alone.

Anyway....that has been my own experience.

1:41 p.m. on August 7, 2011 (EDT)
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I also like Mike's rec. on the Lexel as well. Good stuff TH.

2:29 p.m. on August 7, 2011 (EDT)
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Yeah ... the Lexel is 'bomber' on EPDM (rubber membrane) roofing work.

Other than vulcanizing (with a torch). 

  But, I don't think I wanna take a chance with a torch on my Lowa's.   

On-the-other-hand, I regularly use the small (and "micro") Bernz-0-Matic butane torches in my brasswind instrument repair ... and I can get pretty accurate with the flame, and the flame-shape / temp.  (I used to weld in construction work, so I know my way around torches).      I have even done solder repairs on jewelry with them.

And, YES, Mike.   I hear 'Ya 'bout the FGL's with the stitched-on welts.   I have several pairs.   Even my shop boots (Wolverines, etc.) are Norwegian welted.    Some have steel-toes.    After 8-10 hours on my feet, on sometimes very cold  concrete shop floors, my feet always feel good.  

                                                  ~r2~

6:11 p.m. on August 19, 2011 (EDT)
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trouthunter said:

You could try 'Shoe Goo' Robert, I have also used Lexel sealant with very good success. Lexel is a rubber based high adhesion waterproof sealant that comes in caulking tubes as well as squeeze tubes and is available from hardware stores and home centers. Lexel is much, much better than even the best silicones.

I do not know what shoe manufacturers use, I wish I did, maybe someone can tell us.

 

Now that's funny. I thought I was the only one putting Lexel on my boots. It does work well and they have a clear that is referred to as "water clear" You won't find it in any home center or even small hardware stores around here, but the building supplies and old fashioned lumber yards carry it.

The company that makes it is called Sashco.

Honestly though, if the boots were hardly used, send them back to Lowa for what should be a complementary repair or replacement.

7:50 a.m. on August 20, 2011 (EDT)
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JerseyWreckDiver said:

trouthunter said:

You could try 'Shoe Goo' Robert, I have also used Lexel sealant with very good success. Lexel is a rubber based high adhesion waterproof sealant that comes in caulking tubes as well as squeeze tubes and is available from hardware stores and home centers. Lexel is much, much better than even the best silicones.

I do not know what shoe manufacturers use, I wish I did, maybe someone can tell us.

 

Now that's funny. I thought I was the only one putting Lexel on my boots. It does work well and they have a clear that is referred to as "water clear" You won't find it in any home center or even small hardware stores around here, but the building supplies and old fashioned lumber yards carry it.

The company that makes it is called Sashco.

Honestly though, if the boots were hardly used, send them back to Lowa for what should be a complementary repair or replacement.

 

I thought of that ... after the fact.

I'm a pretty good "D.I.Y.'er at most things.   I DO know my limits.

I went ahead and did the "LEXEL" thing, as I have a couple tubes in my shop (used for EPDM roof-work).

Seems to have worked very well.

Thank you all, for the suggestions.   Appreciate them !

                                                ~r2~

10:53 a.m. on August 20, 2011 (EDT)
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Call Lowa, they will send you a prepaid ups shipping label and box. Put shoes in box with label, mail to Lowa. They fill fix and send you back your boots.

 

Oh yeah, and it's free!

2:22 p.m. on August 21, 2011 (EDT)
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What would be cool (to those not affected I guess) is if you could repair one boot yourself with the Lexel, and have Lowa fix one boot.

Then see which repair lasted the longest.

Sometimes a highly motivated DIY'er with a little time and advise can make better repairs than a lackluster, or overworked Pro will.

I have seen this many times in construction and auto repairs.

I'm not insinuating this is the case with Lowa at all, it's just something I have observed many times.

Let us know how your boots hold up Robert.

8:51 p.m. on August 21, 2011 (EDT)
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trouthunter said:

Sometimes a highly motivated DIY'er with a little time and advise can make better repairs than a lackluster, or overworked Pro will.

 I completely agree with ya on that one. I pay a great deal of attention to what repairs I do on my gear because I am the one who is gonna be in a bind if it fails.

Same goes for anyones gear I fix. I rather them be happy as opposed to dealing with the phone calls if I did a jacked up job.

9:11 p.m. on September 14, 2011 (EDT)
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the fourrepair adhesives i use most are silnet (seam sealer), shoe goo, instant glue (krazy glue or loctite) and epoxy (mix two different elements of the adhesive).  silnet is for tent/garment seams, mostly; shoe goo for flapping soles or holes in soles; instant glue for spot repairs and, in a bad pinch, for closing up cuts that might not respond to a normal bandage.  i have occasionally used epoxy for sole repairs, though it gets kind of brittle.

worth considering that some boot manufacturers may claim that the self-repairs void any warranty, same for some gear modifications. 

9:40 p.m. on September 14, 2011 (EDT)
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leadbelly2550 said:

worth considering that some boot manufacturers may claim that the self-repairs void any warranty, same for some gear modifications. 

Absolutely with you 100% on that one. If I remember correctly on another thread Tipi had a problem with his Limmers in the field and he addressed it and they wouldn't do anything for him as far as warranty work went.

Here is the thread. leadbelly2550, I am sure ya remember this one.

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/gear-selection/topics/95016.html#96253

This situation did make me kinda scratch my head a bit. They made a thread mistake and he did an in-field fix to get through the trip but since he did the fix they said the warranty was voided. 

I was wondering what alternative he had? Walk out in his socks?

12:37 a.m. on September 15, 2011 (EDT)
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Just  read the thread in the above post.  I don't think Limmer will ever see any money from me.

 

@Robert :  I'm sure you've seen this but if not here is Lowas warranty:

http://www.lowaboots.com/faq/warranty.cfm

5:27 a.m. on September 15, 2011 (EDT)
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Ahh seen it.

Even took 'em back to where purchased in the original box, with the labels and price tags still pasted on it (bar-code, etc).

It was well beyond the 12-month warrantee period.

Still -- I was a little disappointed.   I do a lot of business at this particular store.

They did give me a super-deal on another item while I was there.   Threw in a little "freebie", also.

My repair seems to be holding-up rather well.

                                                ~r2~

9:28 p.m. on September 16, 2011 (EDT)
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@ Robert Rowe:  I'm glad to hear that you have saved your boots sole.  I have a freind who is a exorcist/spiritualist/priest.  I asked him about this problem and he said that the most important thing you can do for a boot when it's sole is lost or comprimised is to take care of the problem as fast as possible.  He said once a boots sole is lost or comprimised, if not taken care of immediately, it is negatively altered...............forever changed, and the boot will never be the same.

1:39 p.m. on September 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Shoe Goo or even 5200

July 12, 2014
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